Irritable Bowel Syndrom(IBS)

 

What is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)?

Irritable bowel syndrome is a disorder characterized most commonly by cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea. IBS causes a great deal of discomfort and distress, but it does not permanently harm the intestines and does not lead to a serious disease, such as cancer. Most people can control their symptoms with diet, stress management, and prescribed medications. For some people, however, IBS can be disabling. They may be unable to work, attend social events, or even travel short distances.

SYMPTOMS OF IBS

Abdominal pain, bloating, and discomfort are the main symptoms of IBS. However, symptoms can vary from person to person. Some people have constipation, which means hard, difficult-to-pass, or infrequent bowel movements. Often these people report straining and cramping when trying to have a bowel movement but cannot eliminate any stool, or they are able to eliminate only a small amount. If they are able to have a bowel movement, there may be mucus in it, which is a fluid that moistens and protect passages in the digestive system. Some people with IBS experience diarrhea, which is frequent, loose, watery, stools. People with diarrhea frequently feel an urgent and uncontrollable need to have a bowel movement. Other people with IBS alternate between constipation and diarrhea. Sometimes people find that their symptoms subside for a few months and then return, while others report a constant worsening of symptoms over time.

SOME OF THE CAUSES

Researchers have yet to discover any specific cause for IBS. One theory is that people who suffer from IBS have a colon (large bowel) that is particularly sensitive and reactive to certain foods and stress. The immune system, which fights infection, may also be involved.

  • Normal motility, or movement, may not be present in a colon of a person who has IBS. It can be spasmodic or can even stop working temporarily. Spasms are sudden strong muscle contractions that come and go.
  • The lining of the colon called the epithelium, which is affected by the immune and nervous systems, regulates the flow of fluids in and out of the colon. In IBS, the epithelium appears to work properly. However, when the contents inside the colon move too quickly, the colon looses its ability to absorb fluids. The result is too much fluid in the stool. In other people, the movement inside the colon is too slow, which causes extra fluid to be absorbed. As a result, a person develops constipation.
  • A person’s colon may respond strongly to stimuli such as certain foods or stress that would not bother most people.

Recent research has reported that serotonin is linked with normal gastrointestinal (GI) functioning. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter, or chemical, that delivers messages from one part of your body to another. Ninety-five percent of the serotonin in your body is located in the GI tract, and the other 5 percent is found in the brain. Cells that line the inside of the bowel work as transporters and carry the serotonin out of the GI tract. People with IBS, however, have diminished receptor activity, causing abnormal levels of serotonin to exist in the GI tract. As a result, people with IBS experience problems with bowel movement, motility, and sensation—having more sensitive pain receptors in their GI tract.

In addition, people with IBS frequently suffer from depression and anxiety, which can worsen symptoms. Similarly, the symptoms associated with IBS can cause a person to feel depressed and anxious.

Researchers have reported that IBS may be caused by a bacterial infection in the gastrointestinal tract. Studies show that people who have had gastroenteritis sometimes develop IBS, otherwise called post-infectious IBS

The following have been associated with a worsening of IBS symptoms

  • large meals
  • bloating from gas in the colon
  • medicines
  • wheat, rye, barley, chocolate, milk products, or alcohol
  • drinks with caffeine, such as coffee, tea, or colas
  • stress, conflict, or emotional upsets

Researchers have found that women with IBS may have more symptoms during their menstrual periods, suggesting that reproductive hormones can worsen IBS problems.

How is IBS diagnosed?

If you think you have IBS, seeing your doctor is the first step. IBS is generally diagnosed on the basis of a complete medical history that includes a careful description of symptoms and a physical examination.

There is no specific test for IBS, although diagnostic tests may be performed to rule out other diseases. These tests may include stool sample testing, blood tests, and x rays. Typically, a doctor will perform a sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy, which allows the doctor to look inside the colon. This is done by inserting a small, flexible tube with a camera on the end of it through the anus. The camera then transfers the images of your colon onto a large screen for the doctor to see better.

If your test results are negative, the doctor may diagnose IBS based on your symptoms, including how often you have had abdominal pain or discomfort during the past year, when the pain starts and stops in relation to bowel function, and how your bowel frequency and stool consistency have changed. Many doctors refer to a list of specific symptoms that must be present to make a diagnosis of IBS.

Symptoms include

  • Abdominal pain or discomfort for at least 12 weeks out of the previous 12 months. These 12 weeks do not have to be consecutive.
  • The abdominal pain or discomfort has two of the following three features:
    • It is relieved by having a bowel movement.
    • When it starts, there is a change in how often you have a bowel movement.
    • When it starts, there is a change in the form of the stool or the way it looks.
  • Certain symptoms must also be present, such as
    • a change in frequency of bowel movements
    • a change in appearance of bowel movements
    • feelings of uncontrollable urgency to have a bowel movement
    • difficulty or inability to pass stool
    • mucus in the stool
    • bloating

Once a person is diagnosed as IBS , I believe the best way to cure the disease PERMANENTLY is to practice daily CLEANSING PROCESS YOGA
alongwith doctor’s prescribed medicine.Ayurvedic herbal medicine is very good for this kind of disease.

YOU  MAY CLICK & READ THE ARTICLE

Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Herbal Help

Natural help for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Home Remedy for IBS

Homeopathy & IBS

Homeopathic Treatment for IBS

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6 thoughts on “Irritable Bowel Syndrom(IBS)

  1. Harish Anand

    I have been practicing Ayurvedic medicine as a hobby for the last twelve years. IBS is one of the simplest conditions to treat and the patient response is almost immediate. I treated a young man of 21 some five years ago. He could not hold food/drink and had to visit a toilet immediately after eating/or a drink. One teaspoon of herbal powder with honey washed down with warm water, twice daily was enough to stop abdominal pain,cramps, diarrhea etc. He rang me on the third day feeling relieved and fine. He successfully completd a computers course and recently got married. Now he calls me uncleji and rings occasionally for advice. The powder is made by a charitable trust in India from a fruit which grows wild in northern India. It settles the stomach bug like magic. Tastes sweet. No side effects.

    Reply
  2. docwrite

    Physicians often find treatment for IBS frustrating because of limited options. In addition to data on Ayurveda among alternative medicine therapies, data suggests that chinese herbal medicine and certain probiotics may be beneficial for the patients.

    Reply
  3. kevin.eb

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common disorders that doctors see. Yet it’s also one that many people aren’t comfortable talking about because the signs and symptoms may be embarrassing.Some signs and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome are:

    1}Abdominal cramping.
    2}Bloating and gas.
    3}Diarrhea,constipation or both.
    As many as one in five American adults has irritable bowel syndrome.Most people with IBS find signs and symptoms improve as they learn to control the condition.Only a small percentage of people with irritable bowel syndrome have severe signs and symptoms.

    Fortunately,unlike more serious intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease,irritable bowel syndrome doesn’t cause inflammation or changes in bowel tissue or increase your risk of colorectal cancer.In many cases,you can control irritable bowel syndrome by managing your diet,lifestyle and stress.

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common disorders that doctors see. Yet it’s also one that many people aren’t comfortable talking about because the signs and symptoms may be embarrassing.Some signs and symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome are:

    1}Abdominal cramping.
    2}Bloating and gas.
    3}Diarrhea,constipation or both.
    As many as one in five American adults has irritable bowel syndrome.Most people with IBS find signs and symptoms improve as they learn to control the condition.Only a small percentage of people with irritable bowel syndrome have severe signs and symptoms.

    Fortunately,unlike more serious intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease,irritable bowel syndrome doesn’t cause inflammation or changes in bowel tissue or increase your risk of colorectal cancer.In many cases,you can control irritable bowel syndrome by managing your diet,lifestyle and stress.

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    kevin

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