The diet myth in diabetes


The diet myth in diabetes and heart diseases has been exploded.

Studies by city doctors have revealed that rice and food cooked in mustard oil, in right proportion, do not harm diabetics and heart patients.

A diabetic can have carbohydrate and fat, but in the right quantity,   stated endocrinology head of SSKM Hospital Subhankar Chowdhury.   The belief that mustard and groundnut oil should be replaced with sunflower seed, sunflower and other oils with low saturated fat is also erroneous.

According to doctors, mustard and groundnut oil do not contain saturated fat, which is harmful for diabetics and those with heart diseases. Unsaturated fat is of two types   poly and mono. The two main ingredients of polyunsaturated fat are n3 and n6. A balanced quantity of each is required in a diet.The ideal n6-n3 ratio is 10:1. In sunflower seed, sunflower and other oils containing unsaturated fat, the ratio is 70:1.

This ratio causes abnormal blood lipid levels and blood clot,   explained Chowdhury.
Oil containing monounsaturated fat is also good for diabetics and heart patients, he added. “Mustard oil has a good proportion of monounsaturated fat and n3 type in polyunsaturated fat. Ideally there should be a mixture of both.

Diabetics should not avoid carbohydrates altogether, said doctors.   Carbohydrate is usually substituted with protein. But too much protein can damage the kidney in the long run. For a diabetic, the risk is higher as the organs are affected by the disease,    said a doctor.

A balanced and sensible diet with complex carbohydrates and high fibre content like whole grain, fruits and salads, vegetables and other items low in fat and cholesterol is the key to managing diabetes,  opined a city-based endocrinologist.

Nutritionists feel food with low glycemic index (those that are absorbed slowly and, therefore, maintain the blood sugar level) are good for diabetics.
Oatmeal, whole wheat flour, whole pulses, fenugreek seeds, flax seeds and leafy vegetables have low glycemic index,  said Vijaya Agarwal, consultant nutritionist at AMRI Hospitals.

Frequent meals are advisable for maintaining a proper blood sugar level, signed off Agarwal.

Source:The Telegraph (Calcutta,India)

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