Cuts and Scrapes

Though often just an annoyance, these everyday injuries can become serious, especially if they are neglected. Basic hygiene, prompt first aid, and some of nature’s own remedies can help prevent infections and speed healing.

Narrow slices through the skin that usually bleed.
Superficial skin abrasions that show redness or some bleeding.
Punctures or holes that may penetrate deep into the & see

When to Call Your Doctor
If a cut or scrape is dirty and can’t be cleaned at home.
If the cut will not close.
If blood spurts out or bleeding can’t be stopped.
If signs of infection appear (pus in a cut or scrape, red streaks spreading from the injury, or an unusual discharge or fever).
If you get a dirty cut or scrape or any puncture wound and haven’t had (or can’t recall) a tetanus shot for 10 years.
Reminder: If you have a medical condition, talk to your doctor before taking supplements.

What It Is
Cuts and scrapes are injuries that break the outer protective layer of skin. A cut occurs when the skin is pierced or sliced; a scrape, when the skin is visibly abraded or roughed up.

What Causes It
A cut results from an encounter with a sharp implement, such as a knife, a razor blade, the edge of a piece of paper, or a jagged piece of glass or metal. When the skin is penetrated by an instrument with a sharp point such as a pin, nail, or pencil point, however, it causes a puncture wound. And a scrape occurs when the skin is literally rubbed away by a rough surface such as pebbles or a concrete pavement.

How Supplements Can Help
Many topical supplements can ease or relieve pain, promote healing, prevent infection, and reduce the risk of scarring. They should be used only for minor cuts and scrapes. Gaping wounds that won’t close or injuries that become infected require medical attention.

What Else You Can Do
Stop any bleeding by applying steady pressure to the wound for a few minutes with a clean tissue or cloth. If the injury is a puncture wound, let it bleed for several minutes first to help flush out any embedded germs.
Thoroughly clean the skin around the cut or scrape. Bandage the wound, especially if it’s in an area likely to get dirty, such as a finger or knee. Antibiotics are not necessary unless signs of infection appear.
To help clean and disinfect a wound, add a few drops of tea tree oil to a bowl of water. Soak a clean cloth in the mixture and use it to swab the injury. Or, hold the wound under running water for several minutes. Don’t use hydrogen peroxide; it can damage the outer skin layer and slow healing.
An aloe vera plant is easily grown on a windowsill and makes an invaluable first-aid lotion for minor skin injuries. Break off one of the plumper leaves, slice it open lengthwise, and scrape or squeeze out the clear gel.

Supplement Recommendations

Lavender Oil
Aloe Vera Gel
Vitamin A
Vitamin C
Tea Tree Oil

Lavender Oil
Dosage: Apply 1 or 2 drops of oil to wound after cleansing.
Comments: Dab directly on any superficial wound.
Warnings: Do not take internally.

Aloe Vera Gel
Dosage: Apply gel liberally to wound 3 or 4 times a day.
Comments: Use fresh aloe leaf or store-bought gel.
Warnings: In rare cases, some people develop a mild allergic skin reaction to aloe; if this happens, simply discontinue use.

Vitamin A
Dosage: 50,000 IU twice a day for 5 days.
Comments: Women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy should not exceed 5,000 IU a day.
Warnings: When taken together with isotretinoin or other acne drugs, may cause high blood levels of vitamin A, increasing the chance of side effects.

Vitamin C
Dosage: 1,000 mg 3 times a day for 5 days.
Comments: Reduce dose if diarrhea develops.
Warnings: Don’t take more than 500 mg a day if you have kidney stones, kidney disease, or hemochromatosis, a genetic tendency to store excess iron (vitamin C enhances iron absorption). Also, vitamin C can distort the accuracy of medical tests for diabetes, colon cancer, and hemoglobin levels, so let your doctor know if you’re taking it.

Tea Tree Oil
Dosage: Apply 1 or 2 drops of oil to wound after cleansing.
Comments: Can be used in place of lavender oil.
Warnings: Consult your doctor before applying to deep, open wounds. For topical use only; do not ingest, as tea tree oil can be toxic.

Dosage: Add 3 drops tincture to 1 tsp. water; apply to wound.
Comments: A substitute for tea tree oil. In addition, drink 1 cup of echinacea-goldenseal tea 3 times a day until wound heals.
Warnings: If you’re taking antibiotics or other drugs for an infection, use echinacea as an addition to, not as a replacement for, those medications. Echinacea can overstimulate the immune system and may worsen symptoms of lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other autoimmune disorders. It may also be counterproductive in progressive infections such as tuberculosis. People who are allergic to flowers in the daisy family may also be sensitive to echinacea. If you develop a skin rash or have trouble breathing, call your doctor right away.


Dosage: Apply cream to wound 3 times a day in place of aloe.
Comments: Goldenseal cream or a combination of calendula and goldenseal is also effective; available at health-food stores.
Warnings: People who are allergic to flowers in the daisy family may also be sensitive to calendula.

Dosage: 500 mg 3 times a day on an empty stomach, for 5 days.
Comments: Should provide 6,000 GDU or 9,000 MCU daily.
Warnings: Do not take bromelain if you have an ulcer.

CLICK & SEE  :Cuts and scrapes: First aid

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Source:Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs

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