Earache (Ear Infection)

Whether it’s a middle ear infection, located deep in the ear, or swimmer’s ear, affecting the outer ear canal, an earache hurts. It’s most often a problem in children, but adults get earaches too. Though some conditions clear up on their own, supplements can speed up the healing process….click & see


Throbbing or steady pain in ear; pain when pulling on lobe.
Pressure or itching in the ear.
A bloody, green, yellow, or clear discharge from the ear.
Muffled hearing; popping in ear.

When to Call Your Doctor
If earache is accompanied by fever over 101 F, stiff neck, severe headache, or seepage of pus or other fluids; or if the ear or area behind it appears red or swollen — it is likely an infection requiring antibiotics.

What It Is
An earache results from inflammation, infection, or swelling in the outer canal of the ear or in the space adjoining the eardrum, which is the thin membrane that separates the outer and the middle ear. Normally, the eustachian tube, which extends from the middle ear to the throat, drains fluids from the ear, keeping it clear. But inflammation or infection can irritate the ear canal or block the Eustachian tube, leading to the buildup of pus or other fluids and causing pain and other unpleasant symptoms.

What Causes It

Earaches are typically caused by harmful bacteria, viruses, or fungi, usually preceded by an upper respiratory infection or seasonal allergies, or moisture trapped in the ear. Other causes include excessive ear wax, sudden changes in air pressure, a punctured eardrum, or exposure to irritating chemicals, such as hair dyes and chlorinated water.

How Supplements Can Help
The supplements listed below can play a supportive role in healing earaches. They can be used in conjunction with antibiotics, pain relievers, and other conventional remedies for short-term treatment of mild to moderate ear discomfort. All severe, lingering, or recurrent ear pain, however, requires medical evaluation.

What Else You Can Do
Place a warm compress on the outside of your ear; use a heating pad or warm washcloth. Heat can bring quick pain relief and facilitate healing.
Never insert a cotton swab, which can puncture the eardrum, into your ear. Don’t use hydrogen peroxide as a cleaner; it can irritate the ear canal.
Herbal eardrops often bring rapid pain relief — within 10 minutes of administration. To make the application of drops more comfortable, warm the bottle under hot running tap water before placing the liquid in the ear.
Don’t smoke and avoid smoke-filled rooms, especially if you’re prone to earaches. The latest study to look at the link between secondhand smoke and ear infections reported that exposure to smoke can affect the ears. Children who lived in households with at least two smokers were 85% more likely to suffer from middle ear infections than those who lived in nonsmoking homes.

Supplement Recommendations

Garlic Oil
Mullein Flower Oil
Lavender Oil
Eucalyptus Oil
Vitamin A
Vitamin C/Flavonoids

Garlic Oil
Dosage: A few drops in the ear twice a day.
Comments: May be used alone or with mullein flower oil.

Mullein Flower Oil
Dosage: A few drops in the ear twice a day.
Comments: May be used alone or with garlic oil.

Lavender Oil
Dosage: Apply a few drops to the outer ear and rub in gently.
Comments: Can be used as needed throughout the day.

Eucalyptus Oil

Dosage: Add several drops essential eucalyptus oil to pan of water.
Comments: Bring oil and water to boil and remove from heat; place towel over head and pan and inhale steam through the nose.

Vitamin A
Dosage: 50,000 IU twice a day until symptoms improve; if needed after 7 days, reduce to 25,000 IU a day until symptoms are gone.
Comments: Women who are pregnant or considering pregnancy should not exceed 5,000 IU a day.

Vitamin C/Flavonoids
Dosage: 1,000 mg vitamin C and 500 mg flavonoids 3 times a day until infection clears.
Comments: Reduce vitamin C dose if diarrhea develops.

Dosage: 200 mg 3 times a day until infection clears.
Comments: Standardized to contain at least 3.5% echinacosides.

Source:Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs (Reader’s Digest)

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

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