X-ray showing a the proximal portion of a frac...
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What It Is

Osteoporosis, derived from the Latin for porous bones, is a progressive condition that diminishes the mass (mineral content) of bones and weakens their structure, making them highly susceptible to fracture. Half of postmenopausal women, and up to one in eight older men, will suffer a fracture as a result of osteoporosis. No single measure is sufficient to prevent the disorder, but a combination of supplements and lifestyle changes can be effective in limiting damage.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become weaker and more likely to break. And what’s worse, you may not even feel it happening.

How do your bones get weaker? Your bones are living tissue. They constantly renew themselves with cells that build bone and cells that take away bone. With osteoporosis, your bones lose density, making them weaker and more likely to fracture.


To get an inside look at the effects of osteoporosis, the pictures  below is to explain the difference between healthy bones and osteoporotic (or weak) bones.

Because your bones are living tissue,they are constantly renewing themselves.However when the cells are taken away bone work faster than the cells that built bone, that can cause bone loss. And over the time,it can lead to osteoporosis.

…………………>normal_cells_image.Between healthy bones and osteoporotic bone, there is osteopenic bone (low bone mass). This occurs which bone mass is just below normal, but not quiet osteoporotic. And that means your bones are weakening and loosing mass- a condition that may eventually lead to                           osteoporosis.>.cell_image2- Osteopenia.When the normal bone is viewed under microscope, parts of it  look like a honeycomb. But if you have osteroporosis, the space inside the honeycomb become longer. That means you are loosing bone density.and you get osteoporosis->cell_image3-Osteoporosis

What Causes It

The decline in estrogen after menopause is directly related to the dramatic rise of osteoporosis in older women. This hormone assists the body in absorbing calcium and keeps the bones strong. (Older men experience osteoporosis as well; but because they have denser bones, bone loss is generally less severe.) Lack of regular weight-bearing exercise is another risk factor, as is a diet low in calcium and other nutrients necessary for optimal bone production. Your risk of osteoporosis is also higher if you’re small boned (white and Asian women tend to be small boned), underweight, or postmenopausal; if you have a family history of osteoporosis; or if you’ve taken steroids or anticonvulsants for long periods.


The first sign can be dramatic: a severe backache or a fracture (often of the spine, hip, or wrist.
Other classic symptoms include a gradual loss of height accompanied by the initially subtle development of a stooped posture (dowager’s hump).
Dental X rays may detect early osteoporosis by revealing bone loss in the jaw.

To get better knowledge about Osteoporosis and to learn how we can try to escape from it, we may visit these sites:

Aerobics for Your Bones
Arming Yourself Against Osteoporosis

Better Late than Never
Breaking the Bad News
Can Birth Control Pills Weaken Your Bones?

Exercise Today Keeps Osteoporosis Away
Extra A Not Acceptable

Maintain Strong Bones with Exercise

Treatment options- Latest Advances Trustworthy, Current Report
Natural Calcium Suppliment

Supplement Recommendations

Vitamin D
Vitamin C

Click to learn more about Osteoporosis

BBC NEWS on Osteoporosis

You may click to see->
New treatment for osteoporosis :

Risedronate Reduces Hip Fracture Risk in Elderly Osteoporotic Women

Once a year osteoporosis jab reduces fractures and saves lives

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

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