Monthly Archives: September 2007

Intestinal Adhesions


It is a Digestive Disease

Intestinal adhesions are bands of fibrous tissue that can connect the loops of the intestines to each other, or the intestines to other abdominal organs, or the intestines to the abdominal wall. These bands can pull sections of the intestines out of place and may block passage of food. Adhesions are a major cause of intestinal obstruction.

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Adhesions may be present at birth (congenital) or may form after abdominal surgery or inflammation. Most form after surgery. They are more common after procedures on the colon, appendix, or uterus than after surgery on the stomach, gall bladder, or pancreas. The risk of developing adhesions increases with the passage of time after the surgery.

Symptoms
Some adhesions will cause no symptoms. If the adhesions cause partial or complete obstruction of the intestines, the symptoms one would feel would depend on the degree and the location of the obstruction. They include crampy abdominal pain, vomiting, bloating, an inability to pass gas, and constipation.

..CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURE

Diagnosis
X rays (computed tomography) or barium contrast studies may be used to locate the obstruction. Exploratory surgery can also locate the adhesions and the source of pain.

Treatment
Some adhesions will cause no symptoms and go away by themselves. For people whose intestines are only partially blocked, a diet low in fiber, called a low-residue diet, allows food to move more easily through the affected area. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the adhesions, reposition the intestine, and relieve symptoms. But the risk of developing more adhesions increases with each additional surgery.

Some adhesions will cause no symptoms and no need to treat. For people whose intestines are only partially blocked, a diet low in fiber, called a low-residue diet, allows food to move more easily through the affected area. GI is often used to reduce pressure of intestine.In some cases, surgery may be necessary to remove the adhesions, reposition the intestine, and relieve symptoms. But the risk of developing more adhesions increases with each additional surgery.

Intestinal Adhesions(Abdominal Adhesions) can be treated, but they can be a recurring problem. Because surgery is both the cause and the treatment, the problem can keep returning. For example, when surgery is done to remove an intestinal obstruction caused by adhesions, adhesions form again and create a new obstruction in 11% to 21% of cases.

In China,doctors usually use Traditional Chinese Medicine(TCM) to treat patients and achieve good effect.

Abdominal Adhesions: Prevention and Treatment

Ayurvedic medicines.………………...(A)..………….(B)
YOGA POINT - Cleansing Process or Shudhikriyas.…Yoga Exercise may give very good result

Prevention
Methods to prevent adhesions include using biodegradable membranes or gels to separate organs at the end of surgery or performing laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery, which reduces the size of the incision and the handling of the organs.

Recommendation
Magnetic TCM plaster(special for intestinal adhesions and abdominal adhesions) is strongly recommended by us–a professional special TCM supplier.It can promote intestinal peristalsis and eliminate local edema.

Magnetic TCM plaster(special for intestinal adhesions and abdominal adhesions) is a green and nature treatment that it can remove symptoms of intestinal adhesions(abdominal adhesions)rapidly without any side effect.It is a outstanding representation of TCM.
Additional Information on Intestinal Adhesions
The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse collects resource information on digestive diseases for National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Reference Collection. This database provides titles, abstracts, and availability information for health information and health education resources. The NIDDK Reference Collection is a service of the National Institutes of Health.

To provide you with the most up-to-date resources, information specialists at the clearinghouse created an automatic search of the NIDDK Reference Collection. To obtain this information, you may view the results of the automatic search on Intestinal Adhesions.

If you wish to perform your own search of the database, you may access and search the NIDDK Reference Collection database online.

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse
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2 Information Way
Bethesda, MD 20892–3570
Phone: 1–800–891–5389
Fax: 703–738–4929
Email: nddic@info.niddk.nih.gov
Internet: www.digestive.niddk.nih.gov

The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) is a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The NIDDK is part of the National Institutes of Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Established in 1980, the Clearinghouse provides information about digestive diseases to people with digestive disorders and to their families, health care professionals, and the public. The NDDIC answers inquiries, develops and distributes publications, and works closely with professional and patient organizations and Government agencies to coordinate resources about digestive diseases.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies

Resources:

http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/intestinaladhesions/index.htm

http://www.abdominal-adhesions.com/

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Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum)

Family: Compositae (Sunflower family)
Other Names: Feverwort, Agueweed, Thoroughwort, Sweating plant,
Indian sage.

Related Terms:
Agueweed, Asteraceae (family), astragalin, common boneset, Compositae (family), crosswort, dendroidinic acid, eucannabinolide, eufoliatin, eufoliatorin, eupafolin, eupatorin, Eupatorium connatum Michx., Eupatorium perfoliatum, Eupatorium perfoliatum D2, euperfolide, euperfolitin, feverwort, flavonoids, gravelroot, hebenolide, helenalin, hyperoside, Indian sage, kaempferol, quercitin, rutin, sesquiterpene lactones, snakeroot, sterols, sweat plant, sweating plant, tearal, teasel, thoroughwax, thoroughwort, thorough-stem, vegetable antimony, wild Isaac, wild sage, wood boneset.

Notes: Avoid confusion with gravel root (Eupatorium purpureum), which is also known as boneset. Snakeroot is a common name used for poisonous Eupatorium species, but boneset should not be confused with Ageratina spp., which are more commonly known as snakeroot.

Flowers: July – October
Parts Used: Aerial parts
Range & Habitat: Moist ground; thickets. Nova Scotia to Florida; Louisiana; Texas to North Dakota. Common Boneset has been reported from most counties of Illinois, and is fairly common (see Distribution Map). However, it appears to be somewhat less common than either Eupatorium serotinum (Late Boneset) and Eupatorium altissimum (Tall Boneset). Habitats include openings in floodplain forests, poorly drained areas of black soil prairies, and various kinds of wetlands, including marshes, bogs, fens, seeps, edges of rivers, and sand flats along Lake Michigan. This plant also occurs in or near roadside ditches. Generally, it doesn’t stray far from wetland areas of one kind or another.

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Description:
Boneset is a perennial plant found in swampy areas and along stream-banks in eastern North America. The rough, hairy stem grows to a height of 1 to 5 feet from a horizontal, crooked rootstock. The leaves are rough, serrate, and taper to a long point. Terminal corymbs of numerous, white flowers appear July through October. The fruit is a tufted achene. The plant has only a weak odor but a very bitter taste.

click to see the pictures….(01)..….....(1)..…...(2).…....(3)....……….
It is tall and unbranched. Except for some flowering side stems near the apex. The central stem and side stems are covered with long white hairs. The opposite leaves are up to 8″ long and 2″ across, and light or yellowish green. Their bases surround the central stem and merge together (perfoliate). In shape, they are lanceolate with long narrow tips and serrate margins. There is a conspicuous network of veins, particularly on the lower leaf surface. This lower surface is also pubescent. Some of the upper leaves near the inflorescence(s) are much smaller in size and sessile. The upper stems terminate in clusters of white flowerheads, spanning about 2-8″ across. Each flowerhead is about 1/6″ across and consists of about 15 disk florets. Each disk floret has 5 spreading lobes and a long divided style, in the manner of other Eupatorium spp. The blooming period is late summer to early fall, which typically lasts about 1-2 months for a colony of plants. There is a pleasant floral scent. The florets are replaced by achenes with small tufts of hair – they are dispersed by the wind. The root system is fibrous and produces rhizomes in abundance. Common Boneset typically forms vegetative colonies.
Common Boneset has interesting foliage and fragrant flowers. It tolerates flooded conditions better than many other Boneset species. It can be distinghished from these other species by the perfoliate leaves that surround the central stem. The other species have opposite leaves that are sessile or have distinct petioles. All of these species have spreading clusters of white flowers with a similar appearance. These flowers are quite popular with diverse kinds of insects.

History: The American Indians introduced boneset to early colonists as a sweat-inducer, an old treatment for fevers. The Indians used boneset for all fever-producing illnesses:
such as influenza, cholera, dengue (pronounced DENG-ee), malaria, and typhoid. The Indians also used boneset to relieve arthritis and treat colds, indigestion, constipation, and loss of appetite.
Boneset was listed as a treatment for fever in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia from 1820 through 1916, and in the National Formulary, the pharmacists’ manual, from 1926 through 1950. But over time it fell from favor, replaced by another herbal fever-fighter, aspirin.
Contemporary herbalists continue to recommend boneset enthusiastically for fever.


Cultivation:
The preference is full or partial sun, and wet to moist conditions. The soil should contain considerable organic material so that it can retain moisture. This plant can withstand flooded conditions for short periods of time, but it is not really aquatic. The foliage appears to be little bothered by pests and disease.

Constituents: Quercetin, Kaempferol, Rutin, Eupatorin, Sesquiterpene, Volatile oil, Resin.

Medicinal Properties:
Properties: Stimulant, Tonic, Diaphoretic, Emetic, Aperient, Antispasmodic, Cathartic, and Febrifuge.
Main Uses:
Colds and Flu: European studies show this herb helps treat minor viral and bacterial infections by stimulating white blood cells to destroy disease-causing microorganisms more effectively. In Germany, where herbal medicine is more main-stream than it is in the United States, physicians currently use boneset to treat viral infections, such as colds and flu.
Arthritis: One study shows boneset is mildly anti-inflammatory, lending some support to its traditional use in treating arthritis.

Preparation And Dosages:
To treat colds, flu, and arthritis, and for minor inflammation, use an infusion or tincture.
Infusion: Use 1 to 2 teaspoons of dried leaves per cup of boiling water. Steep 10 to 20 minutes. Drink up to 3 cups a day. The taste will be very bitter. Add sugar or honey and lemon, or mix it with an herbal beverage tea.
Tincture: Dry plant – (1:5). 20 to 40 drops in hot water.
Clinical Effectiveness:
1. Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) is native to eastern North America and was used by Native Americans to treat fevers, including dengue fever and malaria. Today, boneset is used primarily in homeopathic medicine for fevers, influenza, digestive problems, and liver disorders.

2. In the past, boneset was used extensively for a number of conditions, including constipation, fever, and influenza. Currently, however, the use of boneset is limited because other drugs generally are more effective.

3. Boneset may be effective when used orally as an immunostimulant and anti-inflammatory agent. There is insufficient reliable information available about the effectiveness of boneset for its other uses.

4. Products containing boneset have been placed in the “Herbs of Undefined Safety” category by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
CAUTION: Do not eat fresh boneset. It contains a toxic chemical (tremerol), which causes nausea, vomiting, weakness, muscle tremors, increased respiration, and at high doses, possibly even coma and death. Drying the herb eliminates the tremerol and the possibility of poisoning.

Allergic hypersensitivity can result in contact dermatitis due to the sesquiterpene lactone constituents.

Other Uses:  Eupatorium perfoliatum is a specific Butterfly food and habitat plant.

 

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:

http://www.indianspringherbs.com/boneset.htm

http://www.naturalstandards.com/

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/cm_boneset.htm

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Think Before Taking Multivitamins

Excessive multivitamin use could increase prostate cancer risk.

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Go slow on those multivitamins guys!

Men need to be cautious about taking multivitamins more than once a day, for a new study has found doing so may increase the risk of prostrate cancer.

The researchers conducting the study also found that though there was no link between multivitamin use and the risk of developing localised prostate cancer, men who took multivitamins more than once a day were 32 per cent more likely to develop advanced prostate cancer.

They also found that such men were 98 per cent more likely to die from the disease. However, the researchers warn that the study had its limitations.

They pointed out that it was not designed to determine whether multivitamins actually caused cancer; it did not ascertain which multivitamins were taken; and the results failed to establish a relationship between dose and response.

Moreover, other studies have shown no connection between prostate cancer and multivitamins. Harvard Men’s Health Watch, which published the study, suggests that a good diet and other lifestyle changes may help lower prostate cancer risk.

The publication also suggests that though the new study cautions against excessive multivitamin use, it does not show harm from a daily supplement that sticks to the recommended daily amounts of the standard vitamins.

Source:The Times Of India

Acupuncture Helps Back Pain

CHICAGO: Acupuncture provided twice as many patients relief from lower back pain as did conventional drug and exercise therapy, which German researchers said on Monday might point to a “superplacebo” effect.

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In a study of 1,162 adults with chronic lower back pain, 48% of those in a group who underwent between 10 and 15 treatments with traditional Chinese “verum” acupuncture reported at least one-third less pain and an improvement in functional ability, with lasting benefits.

That compared to 27% of those reporting relief in the group undergoing drug and exercise therapy.

In verum acupuncture, 14 to 20 needles are inserted up to 1-1/2 inches deep at “medians” and other prescribed locations until the patient is said to experience a numbing sensation, called Qi.

A third group of patients underwent ‘sham’ acupuncture, where needles are inserted randomly and less deeply around the painful area while avoiding medians. Of these, 44% reported relief from their back pain — more patients than conventional therapy and only slightly fewer than traditional acupuncture. Between 70% and 85% of people complain of back pain at some point in their lives, according to the study

Source:The Times Of India

Treating Flu With Aloe Vera

A new Aloe Vera nose spray may help treat influenza.
alo.jpg
…………..Aloe Vera

Researchers at Texas A&M University are developing an Aloe Vera nose spray that can effectively treat influenza.

Dr Ian Tizard, professor of pathobiology in the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences says that the method in which the vaccine gets delivered right into the body is the key to the new treatment.
Tizard explained the procedure for the production of the medicine and also the way it is combined with flu vaccine.

“We take Aloe Vera leaves and put them through a series of complex extraction steps to produce a chemically pure powder, and then we combine the flu vaccine with it,” Tizard said.

“When this powder vaccine is puffed into the nose, it forms a jelly-like substance that clings to the inside of the nose and is absorbed into the body much more effectively. It stays longer and it has more time to do its work,” he said.

Tizard talked about the medicines’ advantages and added that one or two puffs into the nose were more than enough to get good results in most of the cases.

“This powder form is more effective than a liquid spray because the nose tends to clear liquid sprays out, while the powder turns into a sticky gel and can be a much more potent vaccine. Also, in this powder form, it can be stored for a long period of time, which is great news if thousands or even millions of doses should be needed in the case of an emergency,” he said.

As for the reason for using Aloe Vera in the medicine, it is the special carbohydrate in the plant’s leaves, which is perfect for forming the gel-like substance needed to act as a carrier for the vaccine.

Source:The Times Of India

Brain Death

Brain death is a legal definition of death that emerged in the 1960′s as a response to the ability to resuscitate individuals and mechanically keep the heart and lungs working. In simple terms, brain death is the irreversible end of all brain activity. It should not be confused with a persistent vegetative state.

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When a person does not respond to external stimuli because of brain damage, the condition is known as a coma. In some cases, damage may affect the whole brain, including the brainstem. This part of the brain controls many of the bod’s vital automatic functions, such as heart rate and breathing. If the brainstem is severely damaged, such as after a head injury, these vital automatic functions, such as heart rate and breathing. If the brainstem is severely damaged, such as after a head injury, these vital functions may be affected. if brain damage is irreversible and the brain ceases to function, the person may be certified as brain dead. A person who is brain dead will be completely unable to respond to any stimuli and unable to breathe independently. Without a life-support machine, death occurs within a few minutes.

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Legal history of brain death
Traditionally, both the legal and medical community determined death through the end of certain bodily functions, especially respiration and heartbeat. With the increasing ability of the medical community to resuscitate people with no heart beat, respiration or other visible signs of life, the need for a better definition of death became obvious. This need gained greater urgency with the widespread use of life support equipment, which can maintain body functions indefinitely, as well as rising capabilities and demand for organ transplantation

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In the U.S., an ad hoc committee at Harvard Medical School published a pivotal 1968 report to define irreversible coma. The Harvard criteria gradually gained consensus toward what is now known as brain death. In the wake of the 1976 Karen Ann Quinlan controversy, state legislatures moved to accept brain death as an acceptable indication of death. Finally, a presidential commission issued a landmark 1981 report — Defin­ing Death: Medical. Legal, and Ethical Issues in the Determination of Death. — that rejected the “higher brain” approach to death in favor of a “whole brain” definition.

Today, both the legal and medical communities use “brain death” as a legal definition of death. Using brain-death criteria, the medical community can declare a person legally dead even if life support equipment keeps the body’s metabolic processes working. The first nation to adopt brain death as a legal definition death was Finland in 1971. In the United States, Kansas enacted a similar law earlier.

Religion and brain death
There has been but limited opposition to the shift from traditional indicia of death, based on breathing and heartbeat, to the brain death criteria. However, traditionalist Orthodox Jews have staunchly defended the traditional conception of death in the U.S. and Israel (See Time of Death by J. David Bleich.) Conversely, some modern Orthodox rabbis and Israel’s Chief Rabbinate have adopted determinations of death based on brain function. (See Moshe Tendler’s elucidation of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein‘s responsa.) As a result, Orthodox Jewish ethics has been sharply divided over key death-related policies. Tactically, Orthodox Jewish opponents to brain death have requested waivers from state law, as a matter of religious freedom, so as to continue relying on traditional indicia.[2] Meanwhile, proponents have been active in advocating organ donations and transplants.

Similarly, Islamic views on brain death are mixed. (“Views of Muslim scholars on organ donation and brain death” Transplantation Proceedings, Volume 29, Issue 8, December 1997, Page 3217. Faroque A. Khan, The Definition of Death in Islam: Can Brain Death Be Used as A Criteria of Death in Islam? Farhat Moazam, Bioethics and Organ Transplantation in a Muslim Society: A Study in Culture, Ethnography, and Religion, Indiana University Press, 2006, p.32ff.)

The 1981 federal report, Defin­ing Death, found that Catholic and Protestant theologies did not object to brain death criteria. Indeed, Dennis Horan, president of the pro-life group American Citizens United for Life, stated:

Legislation limiting the concept of brain death to the irreversible cessation of total function of the brain, including the brain stem, is beneficial and does not undermine any of the values we seek to support.

In Catholic medical ethics, brain death was accepted as early as 1957 in the statement of Pope Pius XII that death is determined by medical experts and it “does not fall within the competence of the Church.” (See, “The Prolongation of Life” in The Pope Speaks 4:4 1958) More recently, the Pontifical Academy of Science has upheld Catholic doctrine. (“The determination of brain death and its relationship to human death.” Working Group, 10-14 December 1989, pp. xxvii-210 ) Nevertheless, there was some Catholic dissent on neurological criteria for death. Some pro-life activists oppose or question the current medical criteria for brain death.

Medical criteria for determining brain death
A brain-dead individual has no electrical activity in the brain and no clinical evidence of brain function upon physical examination. This includes no response to pain and no cranial nerve reflexes. Reflexes include pupillary response (fixed pupils), oculocephalic reflex, corneal reflex, no response to the caloric reflex test and no spontaneous respirations.

It is important to distinguish between brain death and states that mimic brain death (e.g., barbiturate intoxication, alcohol intoxication, sedative overdose, hypothermia, hypoglycemia, coma or chronic vegetative states). Some comatose patients can recover, and some patients with severe irreversible neurologic dysfunction will nonetheless retain some lower brain functions such as spontaneous respiration, despite the losses of both cortex and brainstem functionality. Thus, anencephaly, in which there is no higher brain present, is generally not considered brain death, though it is certainly an irreversible condition in which it may be appropriate to withdraw life support.

Note that brain electrical activity can stop completely, or drop to such a low level as to be undetectable with most equipment. This includes a flat EEG during deep anaesthesia or cardiac arrest. To preclude these states being defined as brain death, the term refers only to the permanent cessation of electrical activity.

The diagnosis of brain death needs to be rigorous to determine whether the condition is irreversible. Legal criteria vary, but it generally requires neurological exams by two independent physicians. The exams must show complete absence of brain function, and may include two isoelectric (flat-line) EEGs 24 hours apart. The proposed Uniform Determination Of Death Act in the United States attempts to standardize criteria. The patient should have a normal temperature and be free of drugs that can suppress brain activity if the diagnosis is to be made on EEG criteria.

Alternatively, a radionuclide cerebral blood flow scan that shows complete absence of intracranial blood flow can be used to confirm the diagnosis without performing EEGs.

Brain death and consciousness
It is presumed that a permanent cessation of electrical activity indicates the end of consciousness. Those who view the neo-cortex of the brain as solely responsible for consciousness, however, argue that electrical activity there should be the only consideration when defining death. In many cases, especially when elevated intracranial pressure prevents blood flow into the brain, the entire brain is nonfunctional; however, some injuries may affect only the neo-cortex.

Brain death and organ donation
Most organ donation for organ transplantation is done in the setting of brain death. In some nations (for instance, Belgium, Brazil, Poland, Portugal and France) everyone is automatically an organ donor, although some jurisdictions (such as Singapore) allow opting out of the system. Elsewhere, consent from family members or next-of-kin is required for organ donation. The non-living donor is kept on ventilator support until the organs have been surgically removed. If a brain-dead individual is not an organ donor, ventilator and drug support is discontinued and cardiac death is allowed to occur.
Depending on the age and previous health of the person and the cause of death, relatives may be asked about their wishes regarding organ donation.

What might be done?
If doctors believe that brain death has occurred, a series of tests is carried out by two experienced medical consultants to confirm the diagnosis. these tests check the person’s response to stimuli and the functions that are controlled by the brainstem. They include testing the ability to breathe independently without a life-support machine.

A diagnosis of brain death is made only if doctors confirm that brain and brainstems functions have been lost and that the cause has been identified but cannot be reversed, despite everything possible having been done.

Someone with brain death will not survive for more than a few days, even with care in the critical care unit. full medical support, including mechanical ventilation, will go on while relatives are given counseling. Doctors will discuss the situation fully with the family, and family members will be involved in the decision on when to switch off the life-support machine.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brain_death

http://www.charak.com/DiseasePage.asp?thx=1&id=8

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Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)

Family: Papaveraceae (Poppy family)
Other Names: Red root, Indian paint, Red puccoon, Tetterwort

Height: 6-12 inches

Flower size: 1-1/2 inches wide
Flower color: white
Flowering time: March to May
Origin: native
Parts Used: Root and rhizome
Habitat: Rich woods. Across Canada to Nova Scotia; south from New England to Florida; west to Eastern Texas; north to Manitoba.

Description: Perennial. 6 to 12 inches. Leaves distinctly round-lobed. Flowers white, to 2 inches with 8 to 10 petals, appearing before or with leaves. The roots are vivid red with a characteristic red juice (hence the name Blood Root).

You may click to see the pictures.

History:
American Indians used root tea for rheumatism, asthma, bronchitis, lung ailments, laryngitis, fevers; also as an emetic. Root juice applied to warts; also used as a dye and a decorative skin stain.
A bachelor of the Ponca tribe would rub a piece of the root as a love charm on the palm of his hand, then scheme to shake hands with the woman he desired to marry. After shaking hands, the girl would be found willing to marry him in 5 to 6 days.
One of the earliest reported uses of bloodroot, or puccoon, as it was then commonly known, was a dye. John Smith reported in 1612 that “Pocones is a small roote that groweth in the mountaines, which being dryed and beate in powder turneth red; and this they use for swellings, aches, annointing their joints, painting their heads and garments . . . and at night where his lodging is appointed, they set a woman fresh painted red with Pocones and oile, to be his bedfellow.”

Constituents: Sanguinarine, Sanguidimerine, Cholerythrine, Protopine, Berberine, Copticine, Red resin.The root contains several alkaloids, most notably sanguinarine, which has shown antiseptic, anesthetic and anticancer activity. American Indians used the root for rhuematism, asthma, bronchitis, lung ailments, laryngyitis and fevers. The red-orange juice from the root was applied to warts, used as a dye and a decorative skin stain.

Uses: Bachelors of the Ponca tribe used it as a love charm, by applying it to their palms and shaking hands with the woman they wanted to marry. Within 5 or 6 days, the girl would be willing.

Bloodroot works great for the shade or woodland gardener. The early white flowers are a welcome sign that spring is on the way and the bold, green leaves will persist through the growing season.

Medicinal Properties:
Properties: Antiseptic, antispasmodic, cathartic, diuretic, emetic, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, sedative, stimulant, and tonic.

Main Uses:
It is used when bronchitis, sub-acute or chronic asthma, croup, laryngitis, pharyngitis and deficient capillary (blood) circulation is indicated. It is used as a specific for asthma and bronchitis with feeble peripheral blood circulation.
Bloodroot has been used for many years by American Indians and herbal practitioners as a remedy for skin cancer. The fresh juice from the root, a concentrated tincture, or a salve containing capsicum and fresh juice concentrate has been used.

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Contraindications:
In some cases, excessive doses of Bloodroot can cause low blood pressure, vertigo, tremors, vomiting, reduced pulse, shock, and coma. Large doses can be poisonous.

Some experts recommend the following doses:
Steep a level teaspoonful of the fresh root into a pint of boiling water for half an hour. Strain. When cold, take a teaspoonful 3 times a day.
As a tincture (1:5 in 60% alcohol), 2 drops three times a day.
As an extract (1:1 in 60% alcohol), 1 drop three times a day.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Warning!
Bloodroot is dangerous. It should only be used with
guidance of a trained herbalist or physician.

Resources:

http://ncnatural.com/wildflwr/blodroot.html

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/sanguinariacana.html

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Sharing Grief

Opening To Receive Comfort grief.jpg
When we experience something that causes us to feel shock and sadness, we may feel the urge to withdraw from life. It may seem like remaining withdrawn will keep us protected from the world, but during these times it is important to reach out to those trusted and precious people who care about us the most. Even with our best information and reasoning, we never know when someone else’s experience or perspective can give us additional information that we need. The universe speaks to us through many channels, and when we open ourselves up to receive its messages, we also receive nurturing care from a loving partner in life’s journey.

Grief is part of the human experience, and sharing our vulnerability is what creates truly close bonds in our relationships. Opening ourselves up in this way gets to the core of our being, past all of our defenses and prejudices. When life seems to crack the outer shell of our world, we are both raw and fresh at the same time. It is then that we discover who is truly willing to walk with us through life. We also see that some of those sent to us may not be the ones we expected to see. Regardless, we learn to trust in the universe, in others, in our own strength and resilience, and in the wisdom of life itself.

Sharing grief allows us to ease our burden by letting someone else help carry it. This helps us process our own inner thoughts and feelings through the filter of a trusted and beloved someone. We may feel guilty or selfish, as if we are unloading on someone who has their own challenges. Although, if we think about it, we know we would do the same for them, and their protests would seem pointless. Remember that not sharing feelings with others denies them the opportunity to feel. We may be the messenger sent by the universe for their benefit, and it is on this mission that we have been sent. By sharing our hopes and fears, joys and pains with another person, we accept the universe’s gifts of wisdom and loving care.

Source:Daily Om

Are You Anorexic?

Anorexia nervosa is a serious and potentially lethal illness, which may result in death in ten percent of cases.

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Many models tend to flaunt a lean look and end up being anorexic.

A new study has found that women suffering from anorexia, an eating disorder, have distinct differences in the insulta – the specific part of the brain that is important for recognising taste.

Anorexia nervosa is a serious and potentially lethal illness, which may result in death in ten percent of cases. It is characterised by the relentless pursuit of thinness, emaciation and the obsessive fear of gaining weight.

The study conducted by researchers at University of Pittsburgh and University of California, San Diego also reveals that there may be differences in the processing of information related to self-awareness in recovering anorexics compared to those without the illness.

The findings may lead to a better understanding of the cause of this serious and sometimes fatal mental disorder.

For the study, the brain activity of 32 women was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.) The research team looked at images of the brains of 16 women who had recovered from anorexia nervosa – some of whom had been treated at the Center for Overcoming Problem Eating at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center – and 16 control subjects.

They measured their brains’ reactions to pleasant taste (sucrose) and neutral taste (distilled water.) The results of the fMRI study are the first evidence that individuals with anorexia process taste in a different way than those without the eating disorder.

In response to both the sucrose and water, imaging results showed that women who had recovered from anorexia had significantly reduced response in the insula and related brain regions when compared to the control group. These areas of the brain recognise taste and judge how rewarding that taste is to the person.

In addition, while the controls showed a strong relationship between how they judged the pleasantness of the taste and the activity of the insula, this relationship was not seen in those who had recovered from anorexia.

According to Angela Wagner, M.D., University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, who lead the study, it is possible that individuals with anorexia have difficulty recognising taste, or responding to the pleasure associated with food.

Since this region of the brain also contributes to emotional regulation, it may be that food is aversive, rather than rewarding.

This could shed light on why individuals with anorexia avoid normally pleasurable foods, fail to appropriately respond to hunger and are able to lose so much weight.

“We know that the insula and the connected regions are thought to play an important role in interceptive information, which determines how the individual senses the physiological condition of the entire body,” said Kaye.

“Interoception has long been thought to be critical for self-awareness because it provides the link between thinking and mood, and the current body state,” she added.

This lack of interceptive awareness may contribute to other symptoms of anorexia nervosa such as distorted body image, lack of recognition of the symptoms of malnutrition and diminished motivation to change, according to Kaye.

Source:The Times Of India

Bleeding From Digestive Tract

Bleeding can occur in any part of the digestive tract and should always be investigated because there may be a serious underlying cause. In some cases, only small amounts of blood are lost over a long period of time and go unnoticed. In other cases, severe, sudden bleeding from the digestive tract may result in blood being vomited or passed out of the anus in the feces. You should seek medical help if you notice any bleeding.

Bleeding in the digestive tract is a symptom of a disease rather than a disease itself. Bleeding can occur as the result of a number of different conditions, some of which are life threatening. Most causes of bleeding are related to conditions that can be cured or controlled, such as ulcers or hemorrhoids. The cause of bleeding may not be serious, but locating the source of bleeding is important.

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The digestive or gastrointestinal (GI) tract includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine or colon, rectum, and anus. Bleeding can come from one or more of these areas, that is, from a small area such as an ulcer on the lining of the stomach or from a large surface such as an inflammation of the colon. Bleeding can sometimes occur without the person noticing it. This type of bleeding is called occult or hidden. Fortunately, simple tests can detect occult blood in the stool.

Possible causes:

The causes of bleeding in the digestive tract include inflammation of or damage to the tract’s lining and tumors.

Bleeding from the upper tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, may occur when stomach acid damages the lining of these organs. This is a common complication of the gastroesophageal reflux and peptic ulcers. Severe bleeding is sometimes due to enlargement of veins in the esophagus, which may be a complication of chronic liver diseases.

Most cases of bleeding from the lower digestive tract, which includes the colon, rectum, and anus, are due to minor disorders, such as hemorrhoids or a fissure caused by straining to defecate. However, bleeding may be a sign of colorectal cancer. Diverticulosis and other disorders of the colon can also lead to the presence of blood in the feces.

Symptoms:
The symptoms vary according to the site and the severity of the bleeding. if the bleeding is mild, blood loss may go unnoticed, but it may eventually cause symptoms of anemia, such as pale skin and shortness of breath. Severe bleeding from the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum may cause:

· vomit containing bright red blood or resembling coffee grounds.
· light-headedness.
· black, tarry stools.

If there is a heavy loss of blood from the lower part of the tract, there will probably be visible blood in the stools. When there is severe blood loss from any part of the tract, shock may develop. Shock causes symptoms that include fainting, sweating, and confusion and requires immediate hospital treatment.

What might be done?
Minor bleeding may be detected only during an investigation for anemia or screening to detect colorectal cancer. If the bleeding is severe, you may need intravenous fluids and a blood transfusion to replace loss blood. You will be examined to detect the location of the bleeding, usually by endoscopy through the mouth.

Treatment for bleeding depends on the underlying cause. For example, peptic ulcers are treated with antibiotics and ulcer-healing drugs, but colorectal cancer needs surgery. It may be possible to stop bleeding by a treatment done during endoscopy, such as laser surgery, making open surgery unnecessary. Treatment is usually successful if the cause is identified and treated early.

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Informations about A to Z Digestive Diseases

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies

Source:http://www.charak.com/DiseasePage.asp?thx=1&id=81