Aspilia Africana

Aspilia foliacea
Aspilia foliacea (Photo credit: Mauricio Mercadante)

Botanical Name: Aspilia africana
Family:
Asteraceae
Tribe:
Heliantheae
Genus:
Aspilia
Kingdom
:Plantae
Order:
Asterales

Habitat: Aspilia Africana is native to Africa, Madagascar, and Latin America.

Description:
Aspilia africana is a very rapid growing, semi-woody herb producing usually annual stems about 2 metres tall from a perennial woody root-stock. It has a somewhat aromatic carroty smell. It is widely gathered from the wild and used locally in traditional medicine.

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Historically, Aspilia africana was used in Mbaise and most Igbo speaking parts of Nigeria to prevent conception, suggesting potential contraceptive and anti-fertility properties. Leaf extract and fractions of A. africana effectively arrested bleeding from fresh wounds, inhibited microbial growth of known wound contaminants and accelerated wound healing process. Aspilia is thought to be used as herbal medicine by some chimpanzees.

 

Medicinal Uses:
The potentials of the leaves of the haemorrhage plant, Aspilia africana C. D Adams (Compositae) in wound care was evaluated using experimental models. A. africana, which is widespread in Africa, is used in traditional medicine to stop bleeding from wounds, clean the surfaces of sores, in the treatment of rheumatic pains, bee and scorpion stings and for removal of opacities and foreign bodies from the eyes. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the potentials for use of leaves of this plant in wound care.

The leaves of A. africana possess constituents capable of arresting wound bleeding, inhibiting the growth of microbial wound contaminants and accelerating wound healing which suggest good potentials for use in wound care.

Aspilia africana is widely used in ethnomedical practice in Africa for its ability to stop bleeding, even from a severed artery, as well as promote rapid healing of wounds and sores, and for the management of problems related to cardiovascular diseases. In the present paper, the methylene chloride/methanol extract of A. africana leaves was tested for its contractile activity in vitro. Rings of rat aorta, with or without an intact endothelium, were mounted in tissue baths, contracted with norepinephrine, and then exposed to the plant extract. The effect of the extract was also assessed on the baseline tension of aortic rings in normal and calcium-free PSS. At the lower doses, A. africana slowly re-inforced contractions induced by norepinephrine and relaxed precontracted tension at the highest concentration. The relaxant activity of the extract was endothelium-independent and was not modified by pre-treatment with Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or indomethacin, suggesting that its effect was not mediated by either nitric oxide or prostacyclin. A. africana extract induced slow and progressive increase in the basal vascular tone which was partially endothelium-dependent. In calcium-free PSS, a high proportion of the contractile activity was inhibited (77%), suggesting that A. africana contractile activity in vascular tissue depends, in part, on extracellular calcium.
Aspilia africana (Asteraceae) is a plant currently used in Cameroon ethnomedicine for the treatment of stomach ailments. The methanol extract of the leaves of A. africana was investigated against gastric ulcerations induced by HCl/ethanol and pylorus-ligation. With both methods, the extract inhibited gastric ulcerations in a dose-related manner. Oral administration of the plant extract at the doses of 0.5 and 1 g/kg reduced gastric lesions induced by HCl/ethanol by 79 % and 97 % respectively. The extract at the dose of 1 g/kg reduced gastric lesion in the pylorus ligated rats by 52 % although the gastric acidity remained higher as compared to the control. These findings show that methanol extract of the leaves of A. africana possess potent antiulcer properties.

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Africans Treat Malaria with Aspilia Africana:

Use and method of preparation:
Pound dry leaves into powder. Add two tablespoonsful of powder to half a tumpeco cup (250ml) of boiled water and take two times daily for 7 days.

You may click to see the Toxic Effect of the leaf of Aspilia Africana

Click to see the Potentials of leaves of Aspilia africana

Note: We tried to include as much information of Aspilia Africana as we could collect from the internet.As & when we get more information we will definitely mention in this blog.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/7/24/abstract
http://lib.bioinfo.pl/pmid:12116882
http://www.bioline.org.br/request?tc05024

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspilia

http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Aspilia+africana

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