Tripterygium wilfordii

 

Botanical Name:Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F
Pharmaceutical name: Radix Tripterygium wilfordii
Family:Celastraceae
Chinese Name:Lui Kong Teng
Common Name : Three Wing Nut,Thunder God Vine,
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Celastrales
Genus: Tripterygium
Species: T. wilfordii
Habitat:South part of China, Taiwan, Burma

Description:
Deciduous scandent shrub. Twigs brown, angular, downy. Leaves ovate to elliptic, 5-15 cm long, 2,5-7 cm wide, light green glabrous above, paller, very glaucous and pubescent on nerves beneath. Margin crenate, apex pointed. Small whitish flowers with 5 petals about 9 mm across, in terminal panicles in July.

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Fruit 3-winged, about 1,5 cm long, brown-red.
Click to see:more different Images for Tripterygium Wilfordii

 

Click to see:->Tripterygium wilfordii hook F extracts and components, and uses thereof


Properities
: Bitter & very toxic.

Medicinal uses: Anti inflammatory, killing worms, resolving toxins,treating proteinuric disease, using as  immuno-suppressive agent on auto immune diseases.
Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F or The Thunder God Vine, is a vine used in traditional Chinese medicine for treatment of fever, chills, edema and carbuncle. Tripterygium wilfordii recently has been investigated as a treatment for a variety of disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, chronic hepatitis, chronic nephritis, ankylosing spondylitis, as well as several skin disorders. It is also under investigation for its apparent antifertility effects, which it is speculated, may provide a basis for a Male oral contraceptive. Certain extracts from Tripterygium wilfordii, as well as from Trypterigium hypoglaucum and Tripterygium regeli, were discovered in the 1980s to have temporary antifertility effects, which has led to research on its potential as a contraceptive. Not enough is known about ..

Scientific research on medical effects:-
Certain extracts from Tripterygium wilfordii, as well as from Trypterigium hypoglaucum and Tripterygium regeli, were discovered in the 1980s to have temporary antifertility effects, which has led to research on its potential as a contraceptive.

Not enough is known about T. wilfordii to actually test it as a contraceptive. Research thus far has dealt with establishing the mechanism by which the plant affects fertility, and investigating toxicity and side effects. What has been learned is encouraging, however: in both animals and humans, low doses of various Tripterygium extracts can produce significantly lowered sperm density and motility indices without major side effects. When the treatment was ended in the various trials, all indices returned to normal within months.

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The plant contains many active compounds, at least six of which have male anti-fertility effect (triptolide, tripdiolide, triptolidenol, tripchlorolide, 16-hydroxytriplide and a compound known as T7/19, whose structure is unpublished). The mechanism by which they affect fertility is not yet understood. What is known is that daily doses of these compounds reduce sperm counts and also severely affect the formation and maturation of sperm, causing them to be immotile.

At medicinal doses, T. wilfordii extract does have significant side effects, including immuno-suppression. However, this may not apply to contraceptive use. Many of the side effects are caused by the other active compounds found in the plant, and do not appear when a pure extraction of the anti-fertility agents is used. In addition, the dose required to lower fertility is significantly lower than the standard medicinal dose.

T. wilfordii could be an effective pharmaceutical alternative to contraceptives based on hormonal manipulation. Further research may shed light on its functional mechanisms, and determine whether it could be used at low enough doses to avoid unpleasant side effects.

More recently, a small molecule Triptolide derived from T. wilfordii has been shown to disrupt mitochondrial function in cells and is under investigation as an anti-tumor agent or to suppress auto-immune disorders.

The August 18th 2009 Edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine published an article showing Tripterygium wilfordii was more effective than sulphasalazine in treating rheumatoid arthritis.

Click to see:->
>The Analyst report on health benefits  & side effects of  Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F
>RightHealth Results for Tripterygium Wilfordii
>Herb extract appears to trigger ‘suicide’ in cancer cells :
>The Chinese Herbal Remedy Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources;
http://www.biologie.uni-ulm.de/systax/dendrologie/Triptwilflv.htm
http://alternativehealing.org/tripterygium%20wilfordii%20hook.%20f._float.htm
http://www.righthealth.com/topic/Tripterygium_Wilfordii

http://alternativehealing.org/lei_gong_teng.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripterygium_wilfordii

 

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