Some Health Quaries & Answers

Getting Rid of Body O dour
Q: I have been suffering from body odour, particularly from the armpits, for the last two years. The problem is so severe that if someone around me coughs, sneezes or looks away, I feel it’s because of my body odour.

A:
You may be becoming self-conscious and attributing all actions of others to your odour. That may not be the case. However, to tackle the problem,

• Remove all the hair from your armpits and groin area

• Bathe twice a day using a loofah

• Use an antibacterial germicidal soap like Neko

• Wear only pure cotton clothes

• Apply body spray to the armpits after bathing

At work, if you feel particularly conscious, take a fresh shirt with you (buy two identical shirts, so no one will know you have changed). Change around 2pm after washing and spraying just your armpits.

Ear discharge
Q: My son has brown-coloured blood oozing intermittently from one ear. He does not have any pain or fever when this happens. We consulted a doctor but there was no discharge at that time.

A:
First, you have to be sure the secretion is actually blood. At times, the ear gets filled with brown wax, which can ooze out at times. But if it is blood, it’s a dangerous sign. It may be due to an infection, injury or a foreign body that the child may have inserted into his ear. If neglected, it can affect his hearing. Consult an ENT (ear, nose, throat) surgeon immediately.

Recurrent tonsillitis
Q: My daughter is prone to tonsillitis. The doctor has to give her antibiotics at least five times a year, and these are usually sulfa drugs. Recovery, however, is hardly ever complete and she keeps coughing and complaining of pain for a long time afterwards. She has now been advised tonsillectomy.

A:
Tonsillitis is not always due to a bacterial infection. If it is because of a virus, antibiotics will not work. Bacterial infection in the tonsils is characterised by high fever and pain and difficulty in swallowing. Also, the sulfa group of drugs does not act against tonsillitis; you need to take penicillin or azithromycin. There are some age-old preventive measures for tonsillitis like regular gargling twice a day with warm, salted water.

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Tonsillectomy is not advised unless one suffers from six or more attacks a year. Moreover, the child should preferably be over 10 years. The operation has its own dangers, drawbacks and after effects.

To shave or not
Q: My facial skin becomes black, rough and thick when I shave. My wife says it is because I do it with soap. Should I stop shaving?

A: Your wife is probably right. You need to use a shaving gel or foam containing a moisturiser. The latter will soften the hair and you do not have to scrape it off with a blade. An aftershave acts like an astringent and antiseptic. It will take care of any minor cut that shaving may produce. On the other hand, if you go out into the sun, any perfume in the aftershave may produce photosensitivity and darkening of the skin.

You can apply baby oil to your face at night. This will further soften the skin. Not shaving is often not a solution, because it may impart an unkempt and unprofessional look.

Sleepy child
Q: My granddaughter is an intelligent and active three-year-old. Every time she wakes up from sleep, she asks for her mother and is very slow and lethargic. It takes her about half an hour to become fully aware of her surroundings. Does she need an energising tonic?

A: Many children behave that way. When a child is sleeping, the brain is resting, and it needs time to adjust from zero activity to high activity. Just let your granddaughter make the transition slowly, hugging her for some time. Asking for the mother is normal. She does not need a tonic.

Tongue tie
Q: My son has tongue tie. He is now nine months old. He does not have any difficulty breast-feeding or eating. Relatives say he needs surgery. Which doctor should we consult and where should we have the surgery?

A: Tongue tie is serious if the infant cannot feed. If your son is able to chew and swallow, wait till speech develops. Sometimes tongue tie may be an impediment to speech. If that is the case, you can opt for surgery then. You can wait until he is six years old, as the condition might correct itself as the face, tongue and mouth grow.

Source The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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