Monthly Archives: September 2010

Phellodendron Amurense

Botanical Name :Phellodendron amurense
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Phellodendron
Kingdom
: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Sapindales
Common Name :Amur cork tree
Chinese Name : Huang bo
Other Names: Phellodendron, Huang Bai, Philodendron bark

Habitat: Native to eastern Asia; northern China, Manchuria, Korea, Ussuri, Amur, and Japan, the Amur cork tree is considered invasive in many parts of North America. The State of Massachusetts lists it as a noxious weed.Forests in valleys and on mountains

Description:
Phellodendron amurense Rupr. is a species of tree in the family Rutaceae, commonly called the Amur cork tree. It is a major source of huáng bò, one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine.

.CLICK & SEE

It is a medium-sized deciduous tree grows to between 30′ and 45′ tall. Generally trees are significantly wider than they are talland the branching is broad spreading
short main trunk and several large main branches. Most trees frequently become almost flat-topped with maturity  and picturesque branching.

Summer Foliage:->…..
Leaves are opposite and p innately compound. 5 to 11 leaflets per leaf and leaves are 10″ to 15″ long, leaflets are 2.5″ to 4.5″ long  . The leaf color is a very nice, lustrous dark green. Crushed foliage gives off a turpentine odor.

Autumn Foliage:->CLICK & SEE
yellow and short-lived ,not especially showy

Flowers:->CLICK & SEE
Dioecious, with male and female plants. Flowers are small and greenish-yellow, not ornamentally significant  and blooms in late May and early June.

Fruit:> CLICK & SEE
Pea-sized fruits that change from green to black , aromatic when crushed. Only on female plants held in clusters

Bark:CLICK & SEE
Conspicuously ridged and furrowed, light gray color.Bark is soft and cork-like to the touch, attractive in a subtle way.

Cultivation:
Prefers a moisture retentive well-drained deep rich loam in full sun. Prefers a neutral to alkaline soil. Succeeds in shallow chalky soils. Grows best in areas with long hot summers. Plants are gross feeders and require a rich soil if they are to perform well. Dormant plants are fully hardy in Britain, but the young growth is liable to damage from late spring frosts. The leaves are aromatic. This species is occasionally cultivated for timber in S.E. Europe. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in the autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 2 months cold stratification, sow in late winter in a cold frame[78, 113]. Germination is usually good. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 – 10cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Pot up in autumn and over winter in a cold frame. Fair to good percentage. Root cuttings – obtain in December and store in leafmold in a warm place for 3 weeks. Cut into 4cm lengths and plant horizontally in pots. Grow on in a warm greenhouse. Good percentage[

Medicinal Uses:
Anti-inflammatory, antipyretic,Antibacterial;  Bitter;  Cholagogue;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Hypoglycaemic;  Ophthalmic;  Skin;  Stomachic;  Vasodilator.lowers blood sugar.

Amur cork tree, called Huang Bai in China, is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs, but one that should be used with care. A strongly bitter remedy, the bark acts strongly on the kidneys and is regarded as a detoxicant for hot damp conditions. Recent research has shown that the plant is useful in the treatment of meningitis and conjunctivitis. Huang Bai should only be used under professional supervision and should not be take during pregnancy. The bark is alterative, antibacterial, antirheumatic, aphrodisiac, bitter stomachic, cholagogue, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, hypoglycaemic, ophthalmic, skin, vasodilator and tonic. It is taken internally in the treatment of acute diarrhoea, dysentery, jaundice, vaginal infections including Trichomonas, acute urinary tract infections, enteritis, boils, abscesses, night sweats and skin diseases. It is commonly used in conjunction with Scutellaria baicalensis and Coptis chinensis in a preparation called ‘injection of three yellow herbs’. It is given intramuscularly for upper respiratory tract infections. The bark of 10 year old trees is harvested in the winter or spring and dried for later use. The fruit is expectorant

Purges heat, detoxifies, clears damp heat. Used for infections and inflammation with possible symptoms of discharge from the anus, vagina, or penis. It also is customarily used for night sweats, afternoon fever, and nocturnal emissions. Phellodendron is an effective herb used topically for sores and damp heat conditions of the skin.

You may click to see :->What Are the Medical Uses of Phellodendron Amurense?

Safety: Phellodendron should not be used by those with spleen or stomach deficiency with or without diarrhea.

Other Uses:
Cork;  Dye;  Insecticide;  Oil;  Wood.

A yellow dye is obtained from the inner bark. An oil obtained from the seed has insecticidal properties similar to pyrethrum. Wood – heavy, hard, strong, close grained. Used for furniture. The bark is a cork substitute

The mature gray-brown bark is decorative, with ridges and furrows in a cork-like pattern. A suitable tree for large lots and park landscaping, which is generally free of pests. Very tolerant of soil conditio.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.righthealth.com/Health/Phellodendron%20Amurense-s?lid=goog-ads-sb-8536643334
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/Plants/p/pheamu/pheamu1.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phellodendron_amurense
http://holisticonline.com/herbal-med/_Herbs/h354.htm

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Phellodendron+amurense

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Lobelia chinensis

Botanical Name: Lobelia chinensis
Family: Campanulaceae
Genus: Lobelia
Species: L. chinensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Common Name :Creeping Lobelia,Chinese Lobelia,Lobelia chinensis
Chinese  Name :Pinyin : ban bian lian

Habitat:Original native of China

Description:
Lobelia chinensis is a species of flowering plant in the family Campanulaceae. Growing Height: 2″-3″.  Small pink flowers all summer.
It is in hardy to zone 7.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation:
Planting depth: Bog plant, not to be fully submerged. Thrives in full sun to partial shade. Works well in floating islands.

Chemical constituents:
Lobelia chinensis contains constituents including lobeline, lobelanine, isolobelanine, lobelanidine, and some chemical reactions of flavonoid, amino acid etc.

Medicinal uses;
It is one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine.
It has a number of purported uses and folk remedies that include treatment for inflammation, scurvy and fever. A tea made from the stem and leaves can be made to act as a diuretic. Moreover, it also has certain astringent properties and uses.

Click to see : Cadmium and Other Metal Uptake by Lobelia chinensis and Solanum nigrum from Contaminated Soils  :


Other Uses:
This can be grown as cute little ground cover .It makes a darling groundcover of tiny leaves, topped all summer with miniature pink, lobelia-like flowers.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.callutheran.edu/gf/plants/category/gar-4463.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobelia_chinensis
http://www.watergarden.org/Pond-Supplies/Floating-Island-Bog-Plants/Chinese-Lobelia
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Lobelia_chinensis
http://www.plantdelights.com/Catalog/Plants/Lobelia-chinensis.html

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The Truth About 12 Health Myths Even Most Doctors Believe

You Shouldn’t Cut Off the Bread’s Crust. It’s Full of Vitamins.: The truth is: In a 2002 German study, researchers found that the baking process produces a novel type of cancer-fighting antioxidant in bread that is eight times more abundant in the crust than in the crumb. That said, it’s more important to serve whole-wheat bread, with or without the crust, because it’s all around higher in nutrients, such as fiber, says New York City nutritionist Keri Glassman, author of The O2 Diet ($25, amazon.com). Make sure the ingredients list “100% whole-wheat flour.” Breads simply labeled “wheat” are usually made with a mixture of enriched white flour and whole-wheat flour and have less fiber.


If You Go Out With Wet Hair, You’ll Catch a Cold.
:The truth is: You will feel cold but will be just fine healthwise, says Jim Sears, a board-certified pediatrician in San Clemente, California, and a cohost of the daytime-TV show The Doctors. He cites a study done at the Common Cold Research Unit, in Salisbury, England, in which a group of volunteers was inoculated with a cold virus up their noses. Half the group stayed in a warm room while the rest took a bath and stood dripping wet in a hallway for half an hour, then got dressed but wore wet socks for a few more hours. The wet group didn’t catch any more colds than the dry. Sears’s conclusion: “Feeling cold doesn’t affect your immune system.”


If You Cross Your Eyes, They’ll Stay That Way.
: The truth is: “There’s no harm in voluntary eye crossing,” says W. Walker Motley, an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine. But if you notice your child doing this a lot (when he’s not mimicking a cartoon character), he might have other vision problems.
You may click to see:7 Ways to Protect Your Vision

You Should Feed a Cold and Starve a Fever.: The truth is:
In both cases, eat and drink, then drink some more. “Staying hydrated is the most important thing to do, because you lose a lot of fluids when you’re ill,” says Sears, who adds that there’s no need for special beverages containing electrolytes (like Gatorade) unless you’re severely dehydrated from vomiting or diarrhea.

Gum Stays in Your Stomach for Seven Years. The truth is: Your Little Leaguer’s wad of Big League Chew won’t (literally) stick around until high school graduation. “As with most nonfood objects that kids swallow, fluids carry gum through the intestinal tract, and within days it passes,” says David Pollack, a senior physician in the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Care Network. And even though gum isn’t easily broken down in the digestive system, it probably won’t cause a stomachache, either.

An Apple a Day Keeps the Doctor Away.: The truth is: A handful of blueberries a day will keep the doctor away more effectively. Blueberries are a nutritional jackpot, rich in antioxidants and fiber, and they’re also easy to toss into cereal and yogurt. That said, eating a variety of fruits and vegetables is important to prevent many chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes, down the road. (To find out how much earth-grown goodness your child should be getting, enter his or her age, sex, and level of physical activity at fruitsandveggiesmatter.gov.)
You may click  to see: Doctor’s Tips for Keeping Your Kids Healthy

You Lose 75 Percent of Your Body Heat Through Your Head.: The truth is: “This adage was probably based on an infant’s head size, which is a much greater percentage of the total body than an adult head,” says Pollack. That’s why it’s important to make sure an infant’s head remains covered in cold weather. (This also explains those ubiquitous newborn caps at the hospital.) But for an adult, the figure is more like 10 percent. And keep in mind that heat escapes from any exposed area (feet, arms, hands), so putting on a hat is no more important than slipping on gloves.

To Get Rid of Hiccups, Have Someone Startle You.: The truth is: Most home remedies, like holding your breath or drinking from a glass of water backward, haven’t been medically proven to be effective, says Pollack. However, you can try this trick dating back to 1971, when it was published in The New England Journal of Medicine: Swallow one teaspoon of white granulated sugar. According to the study, this tactic resulted in the cessation of hiccups in 19 out of 20 afflicted patients. Sweet.

Eating Fish Makes You Smart.: The truth is: For kids up to age three or four, this is indeed the case. Fish, especially oily ones, such as salmon, are packed with omega-3 fatty acids, including DHA (docosahexaenoic acid). “DHA is particularly beneficial in the first two years of life for brain development, cognition, and visual acuity,” says Beverly Hills pediatrician Scott W. Cohen, the author of Eat, Sleep, Poop: A Common Sense Guide to Your Baby’s First Year ($16, amazon.com). And a 2008 study in Clinical Pediatrics showed an increase in vocabulary and comprehension for four-year-olds who were given daily DHA supplements. Omega-3 options for the fish-phobic? Try avocados, walnuts, and canola oil.

You may click to see: What You Need to Know About Multivitamins

You Shouldn’t Swim for an Hour After Eating.: The truth is: Splash away. “After you eat, more blood flows to the digestive system and away from the muscles,” says Cohen. “The thinking was that if you exercised strenuously right after eating, that lack of blood would cause you to cramp up and drown.” But that won’t happen. Sears concurs: “You might have less energy to swim vigorously, but it shouldn’t inhibit your ability to tread water or play.”

Every Child Needs a Daily Multivitamin.: The truth is: Children who are solely breast-fed during their first year should be given a vitamin D supplement. After that, a multivitamin won’t hurt anyone, but many experts say that even if your child is in a picky phase, there’s no need to sneak Fred, Wilma, and company into his applesauce. “Even extremely fussy eaters grow normally,” Cohen says. “Your kids will eventually get what they need, even if it seems as if they’re subsisting on air and sunlight.”

Warm Milk Will Help You Fall Asleep.: The truth is: Milk contains small amounts of tryptophan (the same amino acid in turkey), “but you would have to drink gallons to get any soporific effect,” says Michael Breus, a clinical psychologist in Scottsdale, Arizona, who specializes in sleep disorders. “What is effective is a routine to help kids wind down,” he says. And if a glass of warm milk is part of the process, it can have a placebo effect, regardless of science.

Source : CNN Health

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Hypertension or High Blood Pressure (BP)

Nothing to worry much, but get going:-


Hypertension or high blood pressure (BP) is like a thief who creeps in without warning in the dead of the night. That’s because the disease produces practically no symptoms.

People rarely develop giddiness, headaches or nose bleeds until the hypertension is very high. The first sign that there is something wrong may be a complication like a heart attack, stroke or ruptured aneurysm.

Blood pressure is optimal when it is 120/80 mmHg (millimetres of mercury) or less. It is considered normal even if it is 130/90 and high when it is 140/90 or more. Values of 130-140/85-99 are considered in the prehypertension category. Blood pressure needs to be monitored every two years after the age of 20 and yearly after 40.

Some kidney and adrenal gland diseases and diabetes can cause a rise in BP. It can also occur with certain medications like the oral contraceptive pill, some pain relieving medications and even decongestant cough syrups. Pregnancy may cause a peculiar type of hypertension called pre-eclampsia. In these patients, hypertension can revert to normal if the aggravating condition is tackled.

Doctors, too, can precipitate hypertension in normal people. The mere thought of a medical check-up and sight of the blood pressure apparatus can set the heart racing and blood pressure soaring. This is called “white coat hypertension”. If these people are monitored for 24 hours as they go about their daily activities, their BP is found to be normal. They do not require treatment.

Hypertension usually sets in during middle age. The exact reason is not known. Genes, the environment and upbringing count. Though it is not due to a single inherited gene, it’s more likely to occur if one or both parents are hypertensive.

Ideally, those with hypertension should monitor their BP at home to make sure it is under control. This way, they can immediately consult a doctor if it seems to be fluctuating or elevated. Wrist and cuff apparatuses are available that show automatic readings. The arm should be straight and on level with the heart while doing this.

Though a reading of 120/80 is ideal, doctors may set a target that is slightly higher in older people.

High BP should not be ignored. It must be treated and kept under control. Untreated, it makes the blood vessels thicken and less pliable. The blood supply to the brain is then affected. This can lead to loss of memory, balance, reasoning and other changes of dementia. It can cause a stroke with paralysis of parts of the body. The heart, unable to pump against high resistance, may fail or there may be a heart attack.

There are several groups of medicines to control hypertension. They should be taken exactly as advised. Timing is important – they pills should be swallowed as per schedule, even on fasts. They should not be taken in the morning one day and in the evening the next.

To prevent hypertension, and help lower the pressure once it has set in, the diet should have no high calorie snacks or junk food, be low in fat and dairy products, and rich in fruits and vegetables.

Fruits and nuts contain potassium and magnesium. The minerals balance the effect of sodium or salt in the diet. Salt causes the body to retain water and this elevates the BP. Salt consumption should be 2.5gm (1/2 tsp) per person a day. The “hidden salt” in aerated drinks, health supplements and preserved food should be taken into account. The taste for salt is developed at a very young age and depends on one’s cooking and eating habits.

A sedentary lifestyle results in a tendency to gain weight. The BMI (or body mass index — weight divided by height in metre squared) should be 23. Obesity (BMI greater than 30) increases the work of the heart and blood vessels. At least 40 to 60 minutes of active exercise should be incorporated into the every day schedule.

Tobacco in any form (gutkha, chewing tobacco, snuff, beedis and cigarettes) aggravates hypertension. When it comes to tobacco, there can be no halfway measures. Use has to be completely stopped. Alcohol, too, raises the BP. If you must drink, consumption should be limited to 60ml a day for men (two drinks) and 30ml a day for women.

Sustained stress, at home or in the workplace, also elevates the BP. Worry has never provided a solution to a problem. It just produces further problems. Exercise, deep breathing, yoga and meditation are good stress busters. Try them.

And for those who are not affected and want to remain that way, get up and get moving. Now.

Source : The Telegraph ( Kolkata, India)

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Ligusticum wallichii


Botanical Name
:Ligusticum wallichii
Family: Apiaceae/Umbelliferae
Genus: Ligusticum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales
Species: L. wallichii
Common Names:  Szechuan lovage &  Chuan Xiong


Habitat
:E. Asia – Himalayas, from India to China.  Shady slopes in forests at elevations of 1500–3700 metres in western China.

Description:Ligusticum wallichiiis a perennial flowering plant in the carrot family, growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to September, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.

 

clic k to see..>…...(01)...(1).....(2)..….

Cultivation:
The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus.The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It cannot grow in the shade.It requires moist soil.

Propagation:
The seed is best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame in the autumn. Stored seed should be sown as early in the year as possible in a greenhouse or cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer if they have grown large enough. Otherwise, keep them in a cold frame for the first winter and plant them out in early summer. Division in spring.

Chemicial constituents
Biologically active compounds in the plant include tetramethylpyrazine….CL
ICK & SEE

Medicinal Uses

Haemostatic;  Nervine;  Oxytoxic;  Vasodilator.

This plant is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs. It is used as a main ingredient of a ‘coronary pill’ which is said to have a definite therapeutic effect on heart problems. Carthamnus is the other major ingredient whilst Acronychia and Salvia are also included. Haemostatic. The root is analgesic, emmenagogue, nervine, oxytocic, sedative and vasodilator. It is used in the treatment of abnormal menstruation, dysmenorrhoea, amenorrhoea, cerebral embolism, coronary heart disease, headaches and body aches. The root is an ingredient of ‘Four Things Soup’, the most widely used woman’s tonic in China. The other species used are Rehmannia glutinosa, Angelica sinensis and Paeonia lactiflora. The root has also shown antibacterial activity against E. coli, Bacillus dysenteriae, Pseudomonas, B. typhi, B. paratyphi, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio Proteus.

You may click to see :Effects of electret and Ligusticum wallichii (chuangxiong) on the functional recovery of muscle grafts

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ligusticum_wallichii
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ligusticum+wallichii
http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00MedTCsitZUzv/Ligusticum-Wallichii-Concentrated-Granules.jpg
http://ethnobotanicals.ca/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=0&products_id=22

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