Infant jaundice

Definition:
Infant jaundice is a yellow discoloration in a newborn baby’s skin and eyes. Infant jaundice occurs because the baby’s blood contains an excess of bilirubin (bil-ih-ROO-bin), a yellow-colored pigment of red blood cells. Jaundice isn’t a disease itself but the name given to the yellow appearance of skin and the conjunctiva (whites) of the eyes.

click to see

Infant jaundice is a common condition, particularly in babies born before 38 weeks gestation (preterm babies) and breast-fed babies. Infant jaundice usually occurs because a baby’s liver isn’t mature enough to get rid of bilirubin in the bloodstream. In some cases, an underlying disease may cause jaundice.

Infant jaundice can be concerning as although the majority of causes are easily treated, some rarer causes are very serious. Also, high levels of unconjugated bilirubin can cause brain damage. This is virtually never seen now due to treatment with UVB light, but it means that it is very important that the baby receives proper treatment.

Types of Infant jaundice:
The most common types of jaundice are:

Physiological (normal) jaundice: occurring in most newborns, this mild jaundice is due to the immaturity of the baby’s liver, which leads to a slow processing of bilirubin. It generally appears at 2 to 4 days of age and disappears by 1 to 2 weeks of age.

Jaundice of prematurity: occurs frequently in premature babies since they are even less ready to excrete bilirubin effectively. Jaundice in premature babies needs to be treated at a lower bilirubin level than in full term babies in order to avoid complications.

Breastfeeding jaundice: jaundice can occur when a breastfeeding baby is not getting enough breast milk because of difficulty with breastfeeding or because the mother’s milk isn’t in yet. This is not caused by a problem with the breast milk itself, but by the baby not getting enough to drink.

Breast milk jaundice: in 1% to 2% of breastfed babies, jaundice may be caused by substances produced in their mother’s breast milk that can cause the bilirubin level to rise. These can prevent the excretion of bilirubin through the intestines. It starts after the first 3 to 5 days and slowly improves over 3 to 12 weeks.

Symptoms:
The main symptom of jaundice is yellow colouring of the skin and conjunctiva of the eyes. Jaundice can also make babies sleepy which can lead to poor feeding. Poor feeding can make jaundice worse as the baby can become dehydrated.

If a baby has conjugated jaundice, it may have white chalky stool (poo) and urine that is darker than normal. (The bilirubin that normally colours the stool is excreted in the urine.)

Medical advise should be sought urgently if:
•Jaundice is present in the first 24 hours of life
•Jaundice is present when the baby is 10 days old
•The baby has problems feeding or is very sleepy
•The stools are pale or the urine is very dark

Causes:
The main cause of jaundice is:
Excess bilirubin (hyperbilirubinemia). Bilirubin is the substance that causes the yellow color of jaundice. It’s a normal part of the waste produced when “used” red blood cells are broken down. Normally, the liver filters bilirubin from the bloodstream and releases it into the intestinal tract. Before birth, a mother’s liver removes bilirubin from the baby’s blood. The liver of a newborn is immature and often can’t remove bilirubin quickly enough, causing an excess of bilirubin. Jaundice due to these normal newborn conditions is called physiologic jaundice, and it typically appears on the second or third day of life.Other causes

A baby may have an underlying disorder that is causing jaundice. In these cases, jaundice often appears much earlier or much later than physiologic jaundice.

Diseases or conditions that can cause jaundice include:
*Internal bleeding (hemorrhage)
*An infection in your baby’s blood (sepsis)
*Other viral or bacterial infections
*An incompatibility between the mother’s blood and the baby’s blood
*A liver malfunction
*An enzyme deficiency
*An abnormality of your baby’s red blood cells

Risk Factors:
Problems with the blood may lead to a rapid breakdown of cells (haemolysis) – if the mother’s blood type isn’t compatible with her baby’s. For example, she may make antibodies that attack and destroy her baby’s red blood cells.

Hormone deficiencies such as low levels of thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) or pituitary gland hormones (hypopituitarism) can trigger jaundice.

There may be inherited genetic problems with the enzymes that convert or break down bilirubin – these include rare conditions such as Crigler-Najjar syndrome, Gilbert’s syndrome, galactosaemia and tyrosinaemia.

There may be problems with the liver, such as biliary atresia, in which the tubes that drain bile from the liver are blocked. If spotted early, an operation can prevent long-term damage (which is why it is important to investigate jaundice that is still there at 10 days).

Your ads will be inserted here by

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

Diagnosis:
Doctors, nurses, and family members will watch for signs of jaundice at the hospital, and after the newborn goes home.

Any infant who appears jaundiced should have bilirubin levels measured right away. This can be done with a blood test.

Many hospitals check total bilirubin levels on all babies at about 24 hours of age. Hospitals use probes that can estimate the bilirubin level just by touching the skin. High readings need to be confirmed with blood tests.

Tests that will likely be done include:
•Complete blood count
•Coomb’s test
•Reticulocyte count
Further testing may be needed for babies who need treatment or whose total bilirubin levels are rising more quickly than expected.

Treatment:
Treatment is usually not needed.

When determining treatment, the doctor must consider:

•The baby’s bilirubin level
•How fast the level has been rising
•Whether the baby was born early (babies born early are more likely to be treated at lower bilirubin levels)
•How old the baby is now
Your child will need treatment if the bilirubin level is too high or is rising too quickly.

Keep the baby well hydrated with breast milk or formula. Frequent feedings (up to 12 times a day) encourage frequent bowel movements, which help remove bilirubin through the stools. Ask your doctor before giving your newborn extra formula.

Some newborns need to be treated before they leave the hospital. Others may need to go back to the hospital when they are a few days old. Treatment in the hospital usually lasts 1 to 2 days.

Sometimes special blue lights are used on infants whose levels are very high. This is called phototherapy. These lights work by helping to break down bilirubin in the skin.

The infant is placed under artificial light in a warm, enclosed bed to maintain constant temperature. The baby will wear only a diaper and special eye shades to protect the eyes. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that breastfeeding be continued through phototherapy, if possible. Rarely, the baby may have an intravenous (IV) line to deliver fluids.

If the bilirubin level is not too high or is not rising quickly, you can do phototherapy at home with a fiberoptic blanket, which has tiny bright lights in it. You may also use a bed that shines light up from the mattress.

•You must keep the light therapy on your child’s skin and feed your child every 2 to 3 hours (10 to 12 times a day).
•A nurse will come to your home to teach you how to use the blanket or bed, and to check on your child.
•The nurse will return daily to check your child’s weight, feedings, skin, and bilirubin levels.
•You will be asked to count the number of wet and dirty diapers.
In the most severe cases of jaundice, an exchange transfusion is required. In this procedure, the baby’s blood is replaced with fresh blood. Treating severely jaundiced babies with intravenous immunoglobulin may also be very effective at reducing bilirubin levels.

Prognosis:
Usually newborn jaundice is not harmful. For most babies, jaundice usually gets better without treatment within 1 to 2 weeks.

Very high levels of bilirubin can damage the brain. This is called kernicterus. However, the condition is almost always diagnosed before levels become high enough to cause this damage.

For babies who need treatment, the treatment is usually effective

Possible Complications:
Rare, but serious, complications from high bilirubin levels include:

•Cerebral palsy
•Deafness
•Kernicterus — brain damage from very high bilirubin levels

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001559.htm
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/infant-jaundice/DS00107
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/jaundice2.shtml

Enhanced by Zemanta

2 thoughts on “Infant jaundice”

  1. Pingback: kingmaxeukl
  2. Pingback: mashengg

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *