Oxalis violacea

Botanical Name :Oxalis violacea
Family: Oxalidaceae
Genus: Oxalis
Species: O. violacea
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Oxalidales

Common Names: violet wood sorrel

Habitat:Oxalis violacea  is native to  Eastern N. America – New York to Wisconsin, south to Florida. It  grows in Woods, shaded slopes, gravelly banks and prairies. Dry sandy or clay soils.

Description:
Oxalis violacea, the violet woodsorrel, is a perennial plant. It  is a low-lying (4″), shy native with small, bell-shaped violet flowers that become white with greenish lines near the blossom’s throat. Leaves and blossoms both open up to the sun, the latter exposing bright yellow anthers, and then fold with shade. Three oval-heart leaflets comprise each leaf. Bees love this plant, which prefers well-drained soils.from BULB.( in appearance to small clovers such as the shamrock, the plant bears violet colored flowers among three-parted leaves having heart-shaped leaflets. Wood sorrel emerges in early spring from an underground bulb.)

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. It is in flower from May to August, and the seeds ripen from Jul to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

Spread: 0.5 to 0.75 feet,Bloom Time: May, Bloom Color: Pink, Lavender , Bloom Description: Pink, lavender, Sun: Full sun to part shade.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
Easily grown in a moisture-retentive humus-rich soil in shade or dappled sunlight.  Succeeds in dry soils. Grows well in a wild or woodland garden.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

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Edible Uses
All parts of the plant are edible; flowers, leaves, stems and bulb.

Leaves – raw or cooked. The acid salty leaves are eaten raw in salads and sandwiches or cooked as a potherb.Use in moderation, see notes at top of sheet. Flowers – raw. An attractive and tasty garnish for salads[183]. Root – raw or cooked. A lemon-flavoured drink is made from the leaves.

Medicinal Uses:
Anthelmintic;  Antiemetic;  Blood purifier;  Cancer;  Salve.

The plant is anthelmintic, antiemetic, blood purifier, cancer and salve. A cold infusion is used to stop a person vomiting. An infusion can be used as a blood purifier, it is said to be a treatment in the early stages of cancer. An infusion of the plant is drunk and also used as a wash in treating children with hookworm. An infusion of the leaves, mixed with oil, can be used as a salve on sores.

In New Mexico, a teaspoonful of fresh or dried powdered leaves is boiled in a cup of water and taken in the morning to help expel intestinal worms.  The raw greens have been eaten in the early spring as a blood tonic, after a winter without greens.  The plant has been used to create a feeling of coolness in a person with fever, and to increase urine flow.  A cold infusion is used to stop a person vomiting. An infusion can be used as a blood purifier, it is said to be a treatment in the early stages of cancer. An infusion of the plant is drunk and also used as a wash in treating children with hookworm. An infusion of the leaves, mixed with oil, can be used as a salve on sores.

Known Hazards:
The leaves contain oxalic acid, which gives them their sharp flavour. Perfectly all right in small quantities, the leaves should not be eaten in large amounts since oxalic acid can bind up the body’s supply of calcium leading to nutritional deficiency. The quantity of oxalic acid will be reduced if the leaves are cooked. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones or hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet since it can aggravate their condition

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Oxalis+violacea
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalis_violacea
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

https://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/wildflowers-forbs/oxalis-violacea-violet-wood-sorrel.html

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