Solidago canadensis

Botanical Name: Solidago canadensis
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Astereae
Genus: Solidago
Species: S. canadensis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms : Aster canadensis. Doria canadensis. Solidago anthropogena

Common Name: Canadian Goldenrod, Shorthair goldenrod, Harger’s goldenrod, Rough Canada goldenrod, Common Goldenro

Habitat:Solidago canadensis is native to northeastern and north-central North America but established as an invasive plant in in other parts of the continent and in other countries as well.
It grows in dry to damp thickets, roadsides, slopes and clearings, avoiding acid soils.

Description:
Solidago canadensis is a perennial plant growing to 1.8 m (6ft) by 1 m (3ft 3in) at a medium rate. The plant is erect, often forming colonies. Flowers are small yellow heads held above the foliage on a branching inflorescenc It is in flower from Aug to October, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

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Cultivation:
Landscape Uses:Border, Container, Foundation, Seashore, Specimen, Woodland garden. Succeeds in any moderately fertile moisture retentive soil in sun or semi-shade. Grows well in heavy clay soils. A rather greedy plant, it is apt to impoverish the soil. The flowers attract butterflies and moths. The plant also attracts various beneficial insects such as ladybirds, lacewings and hoverflies to the garden, these insects will help to control insect pests in the garden. Special Features: Attractive foliage, North American native, Naturalizing, Suitable for cut flowers, Suitable for dried flowers.

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Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Only just cover the seed and do not allow the compost to become dry. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, and grow them on for their first winter in pots. Plant them out into their permanent positions in spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Edible Uses :
Edible Parts: Leaves; Oil; Seed.
Edible Uses: Oil; Tea.

Young leaves and flowering stems – cooked. Seed. Used as a thickener in soups. The seed is very small and is only used as a survival food when all else fails. A tea can be made from the flowers and/or the leaves.
Medicinal Uses :

Antiseptic; Haemostatic; Kidney; Salve; Styptic.

Haemostatic, styptic. The root is applied as a poultice to burns. An infusion of the dried powdered herb can be used as an antiseptic. The blossoms are analgesic, astringent and febrifuge. They have been chewed and the juice slowly swallowed to treat sore throats. A tea made from the flowers is used in the treatment of diarrhoea, body pains, fevers and snakebites. The plant contains quercitin, a compound that is reportedly useful in the treatment of haemorrhagic nephritis. This plant is said to have similar medicinal properties to S. virgaurea. These are:- Goldenrod is a safe and gentle remedy for a number of disorders. In particular, it is a valuable astringent remedy treating wounds and bleeding, whilst it is particularly useful in the treatment of urinary tract disorders, being used both for serious ailments such as nephritis and for more common problems such as cystitis. The plant contains saponins that are antifungal and act specifically against the Candida fungus which is the cause of vaginal and oral thrush. It also contains rutin which is used to treat capillary fragility, and phenolic glycosides which are anti-inflammatory. The leaves and flowering tops are anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, mildly diuretic, febrifuge and stimulant. A good vulnerary herb, it has also proved of value when used internally in the treatment of urinary infections, chronic catarrh, skin diseases, influenza, whooping cough, bladder and kidney stones etc. Due to its mild action, goldenrod is used to treat gastro-enteritis in children. It makes an excellent mouthwash in the treatment of thrush. The plant is gathered in the summer and dried for later use. The seed is anticoagulant, astringent and carminative. A homeopathic remedy is made from the plant. It is used in the treatment of kidney and bladder disorders, rheumatism and arthritis. The German Commission E Monographs, a therapeutic guide to herbal medicine, approve Solidago canadensis for infections of the urinary tract, and kidney and bladder stones .

Other Uses : Mustard, orange and brown dyes can be obtained from the whole plant. The source of ‘Canadian goldenrod’ oil. We have no further details, but it is likely to be an essential oil.
It is often grown as an ornamental in flower gardens.
Known Hazards : Weak potential for sensitization. Irrigation therapy is contraindicated in cases of oedema due to renal or heart disease. Care needed with chronic kidney disease

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Solidago+canadensis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solidago_canadensis

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