Having Sex Twice A Week Reduces Chance of Heart Attack

Men who have sex at least twice a week can almost halve their risk of heart disease, according to new research.
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It shows men who indulge in regular lovemaking are up to 45 percent less likely to develop life-threatening heart conditions. The study, of over 1,000 men, did not examine whether women benefit too.

The researchers who carried out the investigation are calling for doctors to screen men for sexual activity when assessing their risk of heart disease.

Resources:
The Telegraph January 8, 2010
American Journal of Cardiology January 15, 2010, Volume 105, Issue 2, Pages 192-197

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Aconitum Palmatum

Botanical Name :Aconitum bisma
Family : Ranunculaceae
Common English Name : Crowfoot
Sanskrit Name: Prativisha
Hindi Name : Bakhma
Genus : Aconitum
Habitat: E. Asia – Himalayas in Nepal, Sikkim and south Tibet.   Alpine regions between 3,000 and 5,000 metres. Woodland Garden; Dappled Shade;

Desciption:
It is biennial & Perennial herb with tuberous and paired roots. The mother root is often dry and cylindrical and the daughter root varies from shortly conical to long cylindrical. It’s external surface  is somewhat smooth and light brown.The leaves of the orbicular –cordate to reniform with a very wide shallow sinus. Flowers are greenish blue in few flower panicles. The follicles are 2.5-3.0 cm long. Thew seeds are blakish, obovoid, obscurely winged along the raphe and transversly lamellate. It is hardy to zone 0. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES

Roots, biennial, paired, tuberous; conical or cylindrical 4-10 cm long, 0.75-3 cm thick.

Stem erect. Leaves scattered, upto 10, the lowest usually withered at the time of flowering, glabrous, or the upper most finely pubescent on the nerves below; petiole slender 4-10 cm long; blade orbicular-cordate to reniform , 3-lobed. Inflorescence a very loose, leafy panicle or raceme, 10-20 cm long. Sepals bluish or variegated white and blue, uppermost helmet-shaped. Carpels 5, sub contagious in the flower. Follicles sub contagious or some what diverging in the upper part, oblong, obliquely truncate, 2.5-3 cm long and 5-6 mm broad. Seeds blackish, ovoid, about 3 mm long, round in Cross section…

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.
Cultivation :
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Chemical
Constituents: The root contains five diterpene alkoloids, viz Palmatisine (C34 H33 NO2).
(i) A. heterophyllum—

Atidine , hetisine, heteratisine ,Diterpene alkaloids , heterophylline, heterophylline ,heterophyllidine heterophyllisine, hetidine, atidine & ,Atisenol, a new entatisene diterpenoid lactone from roots.

F-dishydrçatisine, hetidine, hetisinone, heteratisine, hetisine, benzylleteratisine, beta —sitosterol, carotene and 3— isoatisine from rhizomes

Toxicology: One report says that this species has a non-poisonous root, though this should be treated with caution. The following notes are based on the general toxicity of the genus. The whole plant is highly toxic – simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people

Medicinal Actions &  Uses :-
Antiperiodic; Tonic.
The root of this species is said to be non-toxic, though some caution should be applied to this statement. The root is antiperiodic and tonic. It is used in the treatment of rheumatism and diarrhoea.

Click to see different Ayurvedic &  medicinal uses

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Aconitum+palmatum
http://www.himalayahealthcare.com/herbfinder/h_aconitum.htm
http://www.indianmedicinalplants.info/d2/index.htm

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Memory Loss Can be Reversed — Just Do THIS

Moderate physical activity performed in midlife or later appears to be associated with a reduced risk of mild cognitive impairment — and a six-month high-intensity aerobic exercise program can improve cognitive function in individuals who already have the condition.
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Each year, 10 percent to 15 percent of individuals with mild cognitive impairment will develop dementia, as compared with 1 percent to 2 percent of the general population.

Physical exercise may protect against mild cognitive impairment by means of the production of nerve-protecting compounds, greater blood flow to the brain, improved development and survival of neurons and the decreased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases.

Rources:
Eurekalert January 11, 2010
Archives of Neurology January 2010;67(1):71-9
Archives of Neurology January 2010;67(1):80-6

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Krill Oil is ‘Safe, Well Tolerated and Effective’

Daily supplements of omega-3-rich krill oil is a safe and effective way of increasing levels of EPA and DHA, according to a new study.

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Four weeks of krill oil supplementation raised levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) in overweight and obese men and women with “no indication of adverse effects on safety parameters.”

Demand for krill oil, rich in omega-3, phospholipids and antioxidants, is increasing. Krill are small shrimp-like marine crustaceans eaten by fish, birds and whales. Krill are considered to have the largest biomass of any multi-cellular animal in the world.

Source: NutraIngredients October 26, 2009

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Alaska Wild Rhubarb

Botanical Name:Polygonum alaskanum
Family :       Polygonaceae
Genus :       Polygonum

Synonyms: Aconogonon alaskanum – (Small.)Soják.
Common Names in English: Alaska Wild Rhubarb

Habitat: Northwestern N. America – Alaska to Yukon and eastern Russia.     Sub-alpine to alpine meadows, talis slopes and ridges. Montane slopes above treeline, steep hillsides, steep cut banks or sandy loam of rivers; 100-1300 metres .

Description:

Perennial growing to 1.8m.
It is hardy to zone 0. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
click to see the picture
Herbs, shrubs , or small trees , sometimes monoecious or dioecious. Stems erect , prostrate , twining , or scandent , often with swollen nodes, striate , grooved , or prickly. Leaves simple , alternate, rarely opposite or whorled , petiolate or subsessile ; stipules often united to a sheath (ocrea) . Inflorescence terminal or axillary , spicate , racemose, paniculate , or capitate. Pedicel occasionally articulate . Flowers small, actinomorphic , bisexual , rarely unisexual . Perianth 3-6-merous, in 1 or 2 series, herbaceous, often enlarged in fruit or inner tepals enlarged, with wings, tubercles , or spines. Stamens usually (3-) 6-9, rarely more; filaments free or united at base ; anthers 2-loculed, opening lengthwise; disk annular (often lobed ) . Ovary superior, 1-loculed; styles 2 or 3, rarely 4, free or connate at lower part. Fruit a trigonous , biconvex , or biconcave achene; seed with straight or curved embryo and copious endosperm.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.


Cultivation:

We have very little information on this species and do not know if it is hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of the country. It is quite possibly no more than a synonym for P. alpinum[257]. Although very closely related to P. alpinum, it is distinct[270]. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in an ordinary garden soil[1] but prefers a moisture retentive not too fertile soil in sun or part shade[200]. Repays generous treatment[1]. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits[233].

Propagation
:-
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is usually free and easy. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer if they have reached sufficient size. If not, overwinter them in a cold frame and plant them out the following spring after the last expected frosts. Division in spring or autumn. Very easy, larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves; Seed; Stem.

Edible Uses
: Drink.
Leaves – raw or cooked. They have an acid flavour and can be used as a sorrel substitute. The chopped leaves and stems have been added to a thick pudding of flour and sugar then eaten. Leaf stems – raw or cooked. An acid flavour, they can be cut into sections and used like rhubarb (Rheum spp). The juice from the plant has been sweetened and used as a refreshing drink. Seed – raw or cooked. It is rather small and fiddly to utilize.

Medicinal Actions &  Uses:-
Astringent; Pectoral.
The whole plant is astringent. The raw roots and stem bases have been chewed as a treatment for coughs and colds.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Polygonum+alaskanum
http://public.fotki.com/bottomdollar/wildflowers_of_east/papaveraceae_–/polygonaceae_buckwh/p_alaskanum3.html
http://zipcodezoo.com/Plants/P/Polygonum_alpinum/

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Benefits of Sleeping ‘Early’

Adolescents who went to bed early were less likely to suffer from depression or contemplate suicide, a new study has found.
click to see
It shows that adolescents with parental-set bedtimes of midnight or later were 24 percent more likely to suffer from depression and 20 percent more likely to have suicidal thoughts than those with parental-set bedtimes set for 10 p.m. or earlier.

Those who reported sleeping five or fewer hours per night were 71 percent more likely to suffer from depression and 48 percent more likely to think about committing suicide than those who reported eight hours of sleep.

Also, participants who reported that they “usually get enough sleep” were significantly less likely to suffer from depression and suicidal ideation.

James E. Gangwisch, assistant professor at the Columbia University Medical Centre (CUMC), who led the study, said the results strengthen the argument that short sleep duration could play a role in a person’s history of depression.

“Our results are consistent with the theory that inadequate sleep is a risk factor for depression, working with other risk and protective factors through multiple possible causal pathways to the development of this mood disorder,” said Gangwisch.

“Adequate quality sleep could, therefore, be a preventive measure against depression and a treatment for the disease,” added Gangwisch, according to a CUMC release.

Data were collected from 15,659 adolescents and their parents who had participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), a school-based, nationally representative, probability-based sample of US students in grades seven to 12 in 1994 to 1996.

Source: The study was published in the Friday issue of Sleep. (Republished in the Times Of India)

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Aconitum koreanum

Botanical Name: Aconitum koreanum
Family : Ranunculaceae
Genus  : Aconitum
Synonyms : Aconitum komarovii – Steinb.
English Name : Korean monk’s hood
Korean Name: Bag-boo-ja
Parts used  : Rhizome.

Habitat : Asia – Korea. Sparse shrub thickets, dry short grass meadows and on argillaceous and stony mountain slopes. Grassy areas in the mountain valleys or on slopes.

Description:
Erect, glabrous, perinial herb with thickened roots, to 1 m tall. Leaves alternate, plamately 3-5 aleft, long-petioled, petioles of upper leaves shoter, almost sesslle, leaflets deeply divided again to lanceolate, sharply acuminate. Flowers racemose at terminal, zygomorphic, pale yellow, sometimes purplish tint ; pedicels short, densely
pubescent ; sepais 5, petal-like, the upper one clearly hooded, the other flat, the lower 2 narrower than the others; petal 2, small,hidden under the hood; stames many, over 3- celled, glaborous. Fruit of 3 follcies, sharp at tip. July-Aug.

You may click to see the pictures of the plant

It is hardy to zone 0. The flowers are pollinated by Bees.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.


Cultivation:

We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by the native range of the plant it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees[1]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Chemical Structures :->

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Young leaves – cooked. This report should be treated with great distrust due to the poisonous nature of the genus.

Medicinal Actions &  Uses.
Analgesic; Cardiotonic; Uterine tonic.
The root is used in Korea to treat chills in the legs and arms and articular pain. The root contains a number of highly toxic alkaloids that can be carditoxic, causing hypotension and arrhythmia, unless they are first allowed to degrade, usually by drying the plant. The root has been shown to be analgesic, cardiac tonic, uterine stimulant.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Aconitum+koreanum
http://www.wpro.who.int/internet/files/pub/97/5.pdf

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Aconitum Japonicum

Botanical Name :  Aconitum japonicum
Family  : Ranunculaceae
Genus   : Aconitum
Synonyms: Aconitum faurei – Léveille.& Vaniot.

Habitat : E. Asia – China: China – Liaoning, Japan – Hokkaido, Honshu, Kyushu, Shikoku; Korea.   Forests, forest margins, by streams at elevations of 500 – 1500 metres in Liaoning province.  Woodland Garden; Dappled Shade;

Description:
Perennial growing to 1m by 0.3m.
It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from August to October. The flowers are pollinated by Bees.
....

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation:
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. A very ornamental plant, it grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes. Closely related to A. chinensis.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Medicinal Actions &  Uses

Analgesic; Antirheumatic.

This is a widely used herbal remedy in China, where it is cultivated for its root. The root is analgesic, antirheumatic, cardiotonic and stimulant. Used in the treatment of neuralgia. Use with caution, and only under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. The plant is very poisonous and should not be used internally.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Aconitum+japonicum
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Aconitum_japonicum
http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic-art/389622/36320/Monkshood-with-details-of-tuberous-root-and-flower
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Aconitum_japonicum

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Aconitum Hemsleyanum

Botanical Name:Aconitum hemsleyanum
Family : Ranunculaceae
Common Name : Climbing Monkshood
Genus : Aconitum
Habitat: E. Asia – C. and W. China.  Forests, forest margins, scrub, mountains and grassy slopes at elevations of 1700 – 3500 metres.Woodland Garden; Dappled Shade;

Description:
Perennial growing to 1.5m by 0.3m.
From mountains in China, this rare Monk’s Hood is happiest climbing through shrubberies, and is well-suited for woodland type plantings. The spectacular clusters of inflated or hooded flowers are steel blue and violet, with darker veining; appearing from late summer into fall, on a very handsome, rambling, self-twining vine. Grow in part sun and moist, well-drained soil, with the roots in the shade. Grows to 10’ or taller. Truly stunning. Hardy zones 7-9.

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It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from July to August. The flowers are pollinated by Bees.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes. Closely related to A. fischeri and considered to be part of that species by some botanists[1].

Propagation

Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year

Medicinal Uses
A widely used herbal remedy in China, where it is cultivated for its root. This is harvested in the autumn as the plant dies down and is then dried before being used. The root is anaesthetic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antirheumatic, cardiotonic, stimulant and vasodilator. Use with caution, the plant is very poisonous and should not be used internally.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Aconitum+hemsleyanum
http://www.hortusb.com/ache.html
Aconitum hemsleyanum

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Saffron May Halt or Reverse Sight Loss

Indian yellow spice saffron may help people from incurable blindness, according to a new study.

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The new research indicates that saffron, traditionally used to colour and flavour curries and Mediterranean dishes, can prove to be an effective weapon in the fight against one of the commonest causes of sight loss, age-related macular degeneration (AMD),  many other medical problems relating to eye and several  other diseases.

The first trials of saffron on human vision shows it significantly enhanced eyesight, reports The Daily Express.

Lead researcher Professor Silvia Bisti said, “When patients were tested with traditional eye charts, a number could read one or two lines smaller than before. Others said they could read newspapers and books again.”

Bisti hailed the results as ‘remarkable’ and claimed saffron “may hold the key to preventing sight loss in the elderly”.

You may click to see :->

Saffron May Ease PMS Symptoms :

Safron,the Costly Spice:

Medicinal Properties of Saffron

Source: The Times Of India

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