Colutea orientalis

Botanical Name ;Colutea orientalis
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Genus: Colutea
Species: C. orientalis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Fabales

Common Name ; Red Flowered Bladder,bladder senna

Habitat ;Colutea orientalis is  native to Europe and Asia.

Description:
It is a deciduous, grey-leafed, bushy shrub that grows to a height of up to 2 m (6 ft). It bears clusters of small yellow and coppery-red flowers in summer, followed by green seed pods. Colutea x media is a hybrid between C. orientalis and C. arborescens.

……

Medicinal Uses:
Leaves have a purging quality, but afterwards have a binding effect.  It is corrected with caraway seed, aniseed, or ginger and a dram taken in wine, ale or broth, on an empty stomach comforts and cleanses the stomach and purges phlegm from the head and brain, lungs, heart, liver and spleen.  From Culpeper: “It strengthens the senses, procures mirth, and is good in chronic agues.” Modern practice uses Cassia angustifolia as the variety instead.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colutea_orientalis

http://www.robsplants.com/plants/ColutOrien

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta

Smilax lanceolata

Botanical Name : Smilax lanceolata
Family: Smilacaceae (greenbriers)
Synonyms: S. lanceolata, S. domingensis
Common Name: greenbrier,Red China Root

Habitat :Grows in southeastern U. S., mostly on the Coastal Plain.  Usually found in floodplain forests.

Description:
High-climbing woody vine. Stems green, round in cross-section, with few or no prickles, usually with many short side branches. Leaves thin, leathery, evergreen, ovate to lance-ovate, acute to acuminate, base rounded or cuneate, 2.5-5 cm (1-2 in) long. Inflorescence umbels in numerous leaf axils. Flowers numerous, small, greenish. Fruits black, 1-3 seeded, 5-7 mm (0.2-0.3 in) in diamete

 

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURE
LEAVES: evergreen, lance-shaped, 2 to 5 inches long, 3/4 to 2 inches wide; deep green shiny upper surface, often variegated, green lower surface; 5 veins, rarely 7; young leaves may have minute blunt teeth along margins

FLOWER: April to July; jasmine-like odor

FRUIT: matures in second year, 1/4 inch, blackish-red berry, 2 seeds

FORM: dark-greenish or reddish brown, splotched with gray; few internode spines, never on fruiting canes, spines at nodes

Medicinal Uses:
Chop and boil a small handful of roots in 3 cups of water to use as a pleasant tasting blood tonic and for fatigue, anemia, acidity, toxicity, rheumatism, and skin conditions.  Drink with milk, cinnamon, and nutmeg to strengthen and proliferate red blood cells.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://www.biosurvey.ou.edu/shrub/smsm.htm

http://www.rnr.lsu.edu/plantid/webtour/species/lancegbr/lancegbr.htm

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta

Let’s Talk About Schizophrenia

People sometimes change inexplicably in their late teens – they behave bizarrely, argue unnecessarily with everyone, imagine events, become suspicious or withdraw into a shell. This is actually a disease called schizophrenia and these forms are classic, delusional, paranoid and catanonic. The word itself means “split mind ” in Greek as it was confused with a multiple personality disorder by earlier physicians. Today, these two illnesses are classified separately.

Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that is likely to affect one in 100 men and women (0.5-0.7 per cent respectively). It strikes people usually in their late teens and twenties. It is rare for schizophrenia to set in after the age of 40 and children are rarely diagnosed with it. They can, however, go on to develop it as adults if they have some other mental illness such as autism.

The onset of schizophrenia is so gradual that it mostly goes unrecognised and untreated, especially in developing countries with inadequate healthcare. In addition, people baulk at the idea of admitting they or a loved one is suffering from schizophrenia though no one has a problem saying they have an incurable chronic illness like diabetes or hypertension.

Schizophrenic patients may be delusional or hallucinate — that is see and hear things that are not real. Their speech may be disconnected, dressing and behaviour may be socially inappropriate and they may cry and laugh for no reason at all. Sometimes the person may be “catatonic” or unresponsive to any external stimulus.

Unreasonable behaviour and a quarrelsome nature may affect relations with friends, family and colleagues. The person may be unable to keep a job. Insomnia and morning drowsiness affect efficiency. The appetite may be poor.

The diagnosis of schizophrenia is difficult as the symptoms evolve gradually over a period of months or years. It is often difficult to pinpoint the exact date at which the changes were noticeable. The symptoms should be present for a month for schizophrenia to be suspected and remain for six months for the diagnosis to be established. The patient or a caretaker can report the symptoms. They should be substantiated by evaluation by a qualified medical professional.

PET scans also do not strictly conform to normal parameters. The brains in schizophrenics have smaller temporal and frontal lobes. The levels and ratios of certain brain chemicals like serotonin, dopamine and glutamine are altered.

The exact reason for these behaviour altering brain changes is not known. However, seven per cent of persons with schizophrenia have a family member who suffers from a similar disease. Many have been born to mothers who suffered several viral illnesses during pregnancy. Environmental factors also play a role — the incidence of the disease increases in persons who are financially insecure or from dysfunctional families with a history of childhood abuse.

Schizophrenics tend to gain weight because their lifestyle is sedentary. Patients also have a predilection for addiction — to tobacco products, alcohol and drugs like cannabis. They are often unwilling to check the addictions to control lifestyle diseases like diabetes or hypertension. Also, they do not adhere to diet modifications or medications needed to keep their disease in check; so this shortens lifespan. They eventually die 10-15 years earlier than their peers. They are also 15 per cent more likely to commit suicide.

Gone are the days when schizophrenics were locked up, immersed in cold baths or given electrical shock therapy. Today there are a plethora of drugs that can be used singly or in combination to control the symptoms of schizophrenia and help the person function fairly normally. These drugs act by correcting the enzyme and chemical imbalances in the brain. Response to medication may be slow and this may be frustrating for the patient as well as caregivers but medication can be increased only gradually to optimal levels. Drugs, combinations and dosages have to be individualised and vary from person to person.

The side effects of medication are weight gain, menstrual irregularities and drowsiness. Some people become very stiff and have abnormal smacking movements or grimaces but doctors are able to tackle this with other medications.

Rehabilitation is important. Once the symptoms are controlled, patients can function in society and even hold down jobs. They need to be trained to handle money and in personal care and hygiene. Medication needs to be continued even when the symptoms have disappeared. The involvement of the whole family helps as the person is then more likely to follow medical treatment and less likely to relapse.

People often ask for a “miracle drug” — a single tablet to treat all diseases. The only universal ingredient to improve health in all diseases (even mental problems) is physical exercise. So go take a walk.

Source : The Telegraph ( Kolkata, India)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Hieracium venosum

Botanical Name : Hieracium venosum
Family: Asteraceae – Aster family
Genus : Hieracium L. – hawkweed
Species: Hieracium venosum L. – rattlesnakeweed
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom : Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision : Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division : Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Asteridae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms:: Hieracium venosum L.

Common Names:Rattlesnake Weed, Hawkweed, Bloodwort, Snake plantain.

Habitat: The species venosum is common in the Northern and Eastern States, and through Canada; selecting dry hill sides with a light soil, and also pine woods.

Description:
Natural Order, Compositae. The genus hieracium embraces several species, all of which have heads of many yellow flowers; flowers all perfect, and all ligulate, (as in dandelion;) leaves alternate, and the entire herb yielding a little milky juice.  Stem one to two feet high, rising almost naked above, or with but one or two glaucous leaves, smooth, dark-brown, and forking above into a loose and spreading corymb. Root-leaves obovate or oblong, scarcely petioled, nearly entire, thin and pale, smooth and purplish underneath, veins distinctly purple, and the midrib sometimes hairy. Heads small, each with about twenty flowers, with the involucre cylindrical and scarcely imbricated; peduncles very slender. May to July.

This genus is closely allied to the genus Nabalus. Some of its species are quite hairy; and one of them (H. longipilum. has its leaves thickly covered with straight bristles half an inch in length. The H. gronovi is more common southward, and is quite hairy in all its parts. The roots and leaves of venosum have been used in medicine. When fresh, the leaves are acrid and excoriating, and will often remove warts; but they lose this property on being dried, and are then (with the roots) simply bitter and astringent.

Medicinal  Uses:
The roots and leaves are stimulating and astringent, moderately permanent, and quite positive in action. They arouse a full outward circulation; and may be used to advantage when the surface is cold and sluggish, and there is hemorrhage from any internal organ. Hence they are useful in uterine hemorrhage, excessive menstruation, bleeding piles, and spitting of blood. They are not so drying as often to prove constipating, but act much like (though milder than) the bark of myrica. Like myrica, they may be used in chronic diarrhea, aphthous sores, nasal catarrh, nasal polypus, and as an injection in foul leucorrhea and rather insensitive forms of prolapsus. It exerts that peculiar influence in stimulating and consolidating the assimilative apparatus, that can be used to good effect in the treatment of those forms of scrofula which are associated with persistent watery looseness of the bowels. Drank freely in warm decoction, and the leaves at the same time applied as a fomentation, the plant is reputed to be of much service in arousing the circulation and nervous system, and casting out the virus of serpents. One ounce of the roots, or an ounce and a half of the leaves, will form a quart of infusion; or they may be added to relaxant alterants in the preparation of sirups. The milky juice of these plants, and their resemblance in other respects to the narcotic genus lactuca, have caused them to be suspected of poisonous properties; but I have not seen any just grounds for such a suspicion, and think them deserving of full investigation.

) When fresh, the leaves are acrid and excoriating, and will often remove warts; but they lose this property on being dried, and are then (with the roots) simply bitter and astringent.  The roots and leaves are stimulating and astringent, moderately permanent, and quite positive in action. They arouse a full outward circulation; and may be used to advantage when the surface is cold and sluggish, and there is hemorrhage from any internal organ. They are useful in uterine hemorrhage, excessive menstruation, bleeding piles, and spitting of blood. They are not so drying as often to prove constipating, but act much like (though milder than) the bark of myrica. Like myrica, they may be used in chronic diarrhea, aphthous sores, nasal catarrh, nasal polypus, and as an injection in foul leucorrhea and rather insensitive forms of prolapsus. It exerts that peculiar influence in stimulating and consolidating the assimilative apparatus, that can be used to good effect in the treatment of those forms of scrofula which are associated with persistent watery looseness of the bowels. Drank freely in warm decoction, and the leaves at the same time applied as a fomentation, the plant is reputed to be of much service in arousing the circulation and nervous system, and casting out the virus of serpents. One ounce of the roots, or an ounce and a half of the leaves, will form a quart of infusion; or they may be added to relaxant alterants in the preparation of syrups. The purple veined-leaves of rattlesnake weed are unmistakable.
Cherokee used the root tea with Mitchella for bowel disorders

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://www.henriettesherbal.com/eclectic/cook/HIERACIUM_VENOSUM.htm

http://www.cumauriceriver.org/botany/hive.html

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=HIVE

Enhanced by Zemanta

Eryngium yuccifolium

Botanical Name : Eryngium yuccifolium
Family : Apiaceae – Carrot family
Genus : Eryngium L. – eryngo
Species: Eryngium yuccifolium Michx. – button eryngo
Kingdom: Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom :Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision:Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division:Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class:Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Rosidae
Order : Apiales

Common Names : Rattlesnake master, Button eryngo

Habitat :Rattlesnake master is found generally in wet or dry prairies and open woods in the southeast US, north to Virginia, and throughout the Midwest to Minnesota, Kansas and Texas.

It is a Missouri native plant which occurs in rocky woods, prairies and glades throughout the State and was a common plant of the tallgrass prairie.

Description:
Rattlesnake master is a warm-season perennial native forb which grows well on wet or dry mesic prairie soil.  Plants grow 2 to 6 feet tall from a short, thick rootstock.  The bluish green basal leaves are up to 3 feet long and up to 1½ inches wide.  The leaves along the stem are much shorter, but they may be as wide as the basal leaves.  All the leaves are thick and parallel veined and have soft or weak prickles spaced far apart along the edges.  The leaf bases clasp the single, erect stem.  Flower heads are on stout peduncles at the tip of the stem.  Each nearly spherical flower head is from 1/2 to 1 inch in diameter and is made up of many small flowers.  Whitish bracts stick out sharply from the flowers, which gives the flower head a rough, prickly feel and appearance.  The heads have a honey-like odor and are in bloom June to September.  Individual fruits, which mature in the flower head, are less than 1/10 inch long.  The root of rattlesnake master has been used medicinally by American Indians and pioneers.  Eryngium is Greek for “prickly plant” and yuccifolium is Greek for “yucca leaves.”

Medicinal Uses:
The plant was used as an antidote to snakebites. The roots were chewed and applied to the bite. The roots have been used medicinally for liver ailments, to increase urine flow, to induce vomiting, and to treat rattlesnake bite.  Very useful in dropsy, nephritic and calculus affections, also in scrofula and syphilis.  It is valuable as a diaphoretic and expectorant in pulmonary affections and used when Senega is not available.  There is some effect in treating inflammations and malaria.  The pulverized root is very effective in hemorrhoids and prolapsus.  Chewing the root results in increased saliva flow.   A liquid made from roots mashed in cold water was drunk to relieve muscular pains.  The roots have also been used for rheumatism, respiratory ailments, and kidney trouble.  A decoction of the roots has been found useful in cases of exhaustion from sexual depletion, with loss of erectile power, seminal emissions and orchitis. A tincture of the roots is used in the treatment of female reproductive disorders.       Rattlesnake master is reported to have bitter aromatic constituents.  No research seems to have been done on the effectiveness of rattlesnake master in the treatment on rattlesnake bites, but an extract of Eryngium creticum was found to be effective as an antivenum to the sting of the scorpion Leiurus quinuqestristus.  This Eryngium grows in Jordan, where it is used by people in rural areas for scorpion stings.

Other Uses:
Native plant gardens, naturalized areas or prairies. Also can be effective in borders.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/plant.asp?code=G500

http://www.millagardens.co.uk/index.php/2011/07/eryngium-yuccifolium/

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ERYU

http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/image.asp?image=G500-0901020.jpg

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

http://www.easywildflowers.com/quality/ery.yucci.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta

Rubus coreanus

Botanical Name : Rubus coreanus
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Species: R. coreanus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales
Synonyms : R. tokkura. ; Rubus tokkura

Common Names: Korean black raspberry

Habitat : Rubus coreanus is  native to Korea, Japan, and China.  300 – 900 metres in W. Hupeh. Thickets on slopes, montane valleys, riverbanks and roadsides at elevations of 100 – 3100 metres

Description:
Rubus coreanus is a deciduous Shrub growing to 3 m (9ft) by 3 m (9ft).
It is hardy to zone 6. It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade. Plants are rarely cultivated for their edible fruit in Japan. This species is a raspberry with biennial stems, it produces a number of new stems each year from the perennial rootstock, these stems fruit in their second year and then die. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Division of the suckers in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit.

Fruit – raw or cooked. Small with a poor flavour. The dark red or purplish black fruit is 5–8 mm in diameter.

Medicinal Uses:
Aphrodisiac;  Astringent;  Ophthalmic;  Restorative;  Tonic.

The fruit is aphrodisiac, astringent, restorative and tonic. It is taken internally in the treatment of complaints associated with disturbed liver and kidney functions, such as back pain, urinary dysfunction, premature greying, blurred vision, infertility, impotence and premature ejaculation. The fruit is harvested when fully ripe and can be used fresh or dried. The juice of the bruised leaves or a decoction of the root are used in the treatment of ophthalmia. The seed is astringent and tonic

An astringent herb that acts as a kidney and liver tonic.  Internally for complaints associated with disturbed liver and kidney functions, such as urinary dysfunction, premature graying, blurred vision, infertility, impotence, and premature ejaculation.  Fresh raspberry leaves can be pureed with some pure water and the juice extracted for use as an astringent wash to treat excessive watering of the eyes.  The juice of the bruised leaves or a decoction of the root are used in the treatment of ophthalmia.  The drug improves vision in liver and kidney deficient symptoms.

Other Uses
Dye.

A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_coreanus

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+coreanus

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

http://www.asianflora.com/Rosaceae/Rubus-coreanus.htm

http://xyerectus.blogspot.com/2010/08/de-corea-rubus-coreanus-otra-planta-del.html

Enhanced by Zemanta

Brachyglottis repanda

Botanical Name : Brachyglottis repanda
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Senecioneae

Common Name : Rangiora or Bushman’s friend . Although it has a single English vernacular name, in Maori it is variably known as Kouaha, Pukapuka, Pukariao, Puke-rangiora, Rangiora, Raur?kau, Raurakau, Wharangi, or Wharangi-tawhito.

Habitat ; It is found in coastal and lowland forest often in high-light situations on the margins or skirts of the forest from North Cape to about Westport.

Description:
It is a shrub or small tree up to 6 metres, with stout brittle spreading branches densely clad in a soft white to buff tomentum. The leaves are between 5-25 X 5-20 cm broad with slightly undulating and lobed margins. The lamina of the leaf does not follow the unduations of the margins and is flat. The petioles of the leaves have a characteristic groove up to 10 cm long. Flowers are found on much branched panicles with each floret being about 5mm in diameter X 12mm long.

The large and leathery leaves are highly useful for a number of purposes, hence its common name of bushmansfriend. It makes a practical paper on which letters have been written but is best referred to as bush toilet paper.

Cultivation & Propagation:
It can be a difficult species to propagate from seed. Pick the seeds as soon as they suggest they are ripe, which is when the tiny ‘parachutes’ are blown from the plant in early summer. Collect seeds from a range of plants. Sow directly into the top 5mm of a fine free draining germination mix. Keep warm but do not over water. Germination may begin within 3 weeks. The seed does not store well. The usual method of propagation is by medium wood cutting in early spring.

Medicinal Uses:
In Europe the leaves are recognised as a homeopathic cure for urinary and kidney complaints.
M?ori used the plant for a number of medicinal uses. The leaves were used for wounds and old ulcerated sores, and the gum was chewed for foul breath but was poisonous if swallowed. It can also be used as note paper.

A gum obtained from the plant is chewed to sweeten the breath. Main use is in homeopathic medicine

Other Uses:
It is an attractive complement to an ornamental garden with its large and hardy leaves and attractive display of flowers in spring.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachyglottis_repanda

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

http://www.bushmansfriend.co.nz/xurl/PageID/9165/ArticleID/-36629/function/moreinfo/content.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Brachyglottis_repanda.jpg

Enhanced by Zemanta

Allium tricoccum

Botanical Name : Allium tricoccum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species: A. tricoccum
Kingdom: Plantae
clade: Angiosperms
clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Common Name : Ramp, Spring onion, Ramson, Wild leek, Wild garlic

Habitat :Allium tricoccum  is native of Europe. The name spring onion can also refer to scallions (Allium wakegi).Ramps are found across North America, from the U.S. state of South Carolina to Canada. They are popular in the cuisines of the rural upland South and in the Canadian province of Quebec when they emerge in the springtime. Ramps also have a growing popularity in upscale restaurants throughout North America.

Description:
Allium tricoccum is a perennial plant produces basal leaves up to 8″ long and 3½” across on short petioles (usually 2 per bulb). The basal leaves are ovate-oval to ovate-elliptic, dull green, hairless, and smooth along the margins. Their petioles are reddish, hairless, and wrapped in a basal sheath. These leaves develop during the spring and wither away by early summer. During early to mid-summer, there develops a naked flowering stalk up to 1½’ tall. This stalk is terete, glabrous, and reddish to pale green; at its base, there is a papery sheath. The stalk terminates in a single rounded umbel of flowers spanning up to 2″ across. At the base of this umbel, there is a pair of deciduous bracts. Each flower is about ¼” across, consisting of 6 white to translucent white tepals, a light green to pale yellow ovary, 6 stamens with pale yellow anthers, and a single white style. At the base of each flower, there is a slender white pedicel. The blooming period occurs during the summer and lasts about 2 weeks. Both the flowers and foliage exude an onion-like odor. After the blooming period, the ovary of each flower matures into a 3-celled seed capsule; each cell contains a single seed. The root system consists of an ovoid bulb with fibrous roots at its base. Offsets often develop, producing vegetative colonies of plants.

Cultivation:
The preference is dappled sunlight during the spring when the basal leaves develop, while during the summer considerable shade is tolerated. The soil should consist of a rich loose loam with abundant organic matter, while moisture levels should be more or less mesic. It is easiest to introduce new plants into an area by dividing and transplanting the bulbs during the fall.

Edible Uses;
The flavor, a combination of onions and strong garlic, or as food writer Jane Snow once described it, “like fried green onions with a dash of funky feet,” is adaptable to almost any food style.

In central Appalachia, ramps are most commonly fried with potatoes in bacon fat or scrambled with eggs and served with bacon, pinto beans and cornbread. Ramps can also be pickled or used in soups and other foods in place of onions and garlic.

Medicinal Uses:
As a spring tonic in native N. American medicine, and to treat colds, sore throat, and worms in children.  Traditionally the leaves were used in the treatment of colds and croup.  The warm juice of the leaves and bulb was used externally in the treatment of earaches.  A strong decoction of the root is emetic.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/wild_leek.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_tricoccum

http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/wild_leek.htm

http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/alliumtric.html

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta

Turnera ulmifolia

Botanical Name : Turnera ulmifolia
Family: Passifloraceae
Genus: Turnera
Species: T. ulmifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Malpighiales

Common Names:Yellow Alder,Ram Goat Dash Along,Buttercup Bush

Habitat :Turnera ulmifolia is native to Mexico and the West Indies.

Description:
Turnera ulmifolia is a nonwoody plant.It hassimple, alternate leaves with toothed edges, The leaf blades were about 5 cm by 2.5 cm long.Theleaf veins are  in a feather pattern (pinnate venation). The flower solitary (not a part of a flower cluster or inflorescence). It has 5 slightly fringed petals and 5 pollen-bearing stamens.Hairs on both top and bottom gave the leaves a velvety feel.

Medicinal Uses:
This herb is said to have aphrodisiac properties.  The tea from the leaves has been used for colds and general debility.

A recent study found that yellow alder potentiated the antibiotic activity against methicillin—resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://ntsavanna.com/elm-leaved-turnera-turnera-ulmifolia/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turnera_ulmifolia

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta

Senecio jacobaea

Botanical Name : Senecio jacobaea
Family :Asteraceae – Aster family
Genus :Senecio L. – ragwort
Species:Senecio jacobaea L. – stinking willie
Kingdom:Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division :Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class : Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Asteridae
Order : Asterales

Common Names: Ragwort,Jacobaea vulgaris

Habitat :Senecio jacobaea is native to northern Eurasia, usually in dry, open places, and has also been widely distributed as a weed elsewhere.

Description:
The plant is biennial or perennial. The stems are erect, straight, have no or few hairs, and reach a height of 0.3-2.0 metres. The leaves are pinnately lobed and the end lobe is blunt. The many names that include the word “stinking” (and Mare’s Fart) arise because of the unpleasant smell of the leaves. The hermaphrodite flower heads are 1.5-2.5 cm diameter, and are borne in dense, flat-topped clusters; the florets are bright yellow. It has a long flowering period lasting from June to November (In the northern Hemisphere).

You may click to see the picture

Pollination is by a wide range of bees, flies and moths and butterflies. Over a season, one plant may produce 2,000 to 2,500 yellow flowers in 20- to 60-headed, flat-topped corymbs. This number of seeds produced may be as large as 75,000 to 120,000, although in its native range in Eurasia very few of these would grow into new plants and research has shown that most seeds do not travel a great distance from the parent plant

Medicinal Uses:
From medieval times to the mid 20th century, Ragwort was used against inflammations of the eye, for sore and cancerous ulcers, rheumatism, sciatica and gout, for painful joints.

According to some, it would relieve the pain of bee stings.

Any applications are external only, never taken internally, and only under professional supervision.

With the large range of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which are known to inhibit or reduce cell division, some researchers hope to use them to slow down or arrest the growth of cells in cancer.[who?]

Other usage
In ancient Greece and Rome a supposed aphrodisiac was made from the plant; it was called satyrion.

Also, the leaves can be used to obtain good green dye, as yellow dye is obtained from the flowers, as can be done for brown and orange.

Ragwort is excellent when taken as an infusion for gouty conditions and rheumatic pains.  It usually gives great relief quickly.  Also very good for lung and bronchial infections.  Ragwort provides a stimulating and warming liniment preparation used externally on rheumatic muscles.  An emollient poultice is made from the leaves.  The juice of the plant is cooling and astringent, it is used as a wash in burns, sores, cancerous ulcers and eye inflammations. It makes a good gargle for ulcerated mouths and throats and is also said to take away the pain of a bee sting. Caution is advised here since the plant is poisonous and some people develop a rash from merely touching this plant.  A decoction of the root is said to be good for treating internal bruises and wounds.

Poisonous effects:
Ragwort contains many different alkaloids, making it poisonous to animals. (EHC 80,section 9.1.4). Alkaloids which have been found in the plant confirmed by the WHO report EHC 80 are — jacobine, jaconine, jacozine, otosenine, retrorsine, seneciphylline, senecionine, and senkirkine (pp322 Appendix II). Other alkaloids claimed to be present but from an undeclared source are acetylerucifoline, (Z)-erucifoline, (E)-erucifoline, 21-hydroxyintegerrimine, integerrimine, jacoline, riddelline, senecivernine, spartioidine, and usaramine.

Ragwort is of concern to people who keep horses and cattle. In areas of the world where ragwort is a native plant, such as Britain and continental Europe, documented cases of proven poisoning are rare. Horses do not normally eat fresh ragwort due to its bitter taste. It loses this taste when dried and can become a danger in hay. The result, if sufficient quantity is consumed, can be irreversible cirrhosis of the liver. Signs that a horse has been poisoned include yellow mucus membranes, depression, and lack of coordination. Animals may also resort to the consumption of ragwort when there is shortage of food. In rare cases they can even become addicted to it. Sheep, in marked contrast, eat small quantities of the plant with relish. Sheep and goats suffer the same process of liver destruction but at a reduced rate to horses and pigs. They seem to profit slightly from eating it; according to some reports[who?], the alkaloids kill worms in the sheep’s stomach.

The danger of Ragwort is that the toxin can have a cumulative effect. The alkaloid does not actually accumulate in the liver but a breakdown product can damage DNA and progressively kills cells. About 3-7% of the body weight is sometimes claimed as deadly for horses, but an example in the scientific literature exists of a horse surviving being fed over 20% of its body weight. The effect of low doses is lessened by the destruction of the original alkaloids by the action of bacteria in the digestive tract before they reach the bloodstream. There is no known antidote or cure to poisoning, but examples are known from the scientific literature of horses making a full recovery once consumption has been stopped.

Ragwort poses little risk to the livers of humans since, although it is theoretically poisonous to humans, it is distasteful and is not used as a food. The alkaloids can be absorbed in small quantities through the skin but studies have shown that the absorption is very much less than by ingestion. Also they are in the N-oxide form which only becomes toxic after conversion inside the digestive tract and they will be excreted harmlessly.

Some sensitive individuals can suffer from an allergic reaction because ragwort like many members of the compositae family contains sesquiterpine lactones which can cause compositae dermatitis. These are different from the pyrrolizidine alkaloids which are responsible for the toxic effects.

Honey collected over Ragwort has been found to contain small quantities of jacoline, jacobine, jacozine, senecionine, and seneciphylline, but the quantities have been judged as too minute to be of concern

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobaea_vulgaris

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SEJA

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta