Tag Archives: Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine

Tongue Tells the Truth of Your Health

Most dentists take note of the state of your tongue (and gums) when they’re looking inside your mouth, and are well aware that a carpet of yellow fur on your tongue indicates you overdid things last night.

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However, here at the John Roberts Holistic Dentistry Practice, in West Yorkshire, they draw not just on common sense, but on the specific teaching of traditional Chinese medicine.
Just as Western opticians have now started inspecting the eyes for signs of diabetes, Chinese physicians have for centuries been using a tongue ‘map’ to chart what’s happening in the rest of the body.
‘Each area of the tongue corresponds to a different internal organ; which means, basically, the tongue is the window through which one can look into the body,’ Dr Roberts explains.
Dr Roberts is looking for, then, is any swelling, discolouration or cracking that will give him a clue about the wider me. He’s gazing at the rifts and chasms of my tongue as closely as if this were Crime Scene Investigation.
‘This line down the centre of your tongue, not bad at all,’ he murmurs appreciatively. ‘Not too deep, not too shallow. Not so good, though, is the scalloping on the right-hand side.’
‘The what?’ I ask, somewhat alarmed. Holding the mirror he offers me up to my mouth, I view my lunar-esque lingual landscape. And those bumps don’t look like scallops, more like cocktail sausages.
‘Yes, well, the point is, they indicate issues with the gall bladder,’ says Dr Roberts.
Issues? I don’t like the sound of that. ‘We’re not talking about serious disease,’ he stresses.

‘More an imbalance that can be remedied, usually by diet. You’ve been eating too much hot and spicy food and it could be upsetting your system.’

So what else does my tongue say about me, other than that there’s a bit of industrial unrest in the gall bladder department?
Conventional: Most dentists will just treat your teeth
‘Well, it’s a good colour, that’s for sure,’ comes the reply. ‘Just the right shade of vibrant pink.’
Ooh, he’s making me blush the same colour. Then comes the bad news. It turns out my tongue is wobbling.
‘When a tongue won’t stay still, it’s generally a sign the person is lacking in energy,’ says Dr Roberts.

‘Another thing that strikes me, looking into your mouth, is how cramped your tongue is.’
It’s true; for years dentists have lamented the lack of space in there, every so often coming up with radical redesign proposals, usually involving extractions. But the intention was always to make the remaining teeth look straighter, not to give my tongue more playspace.
Dr Roberts maintains that a caged-in tongue makes eventually for a caged-in person. ‘I wonder, do you have any frustration or anger issues?’ he asks. He’s looking for a punch in the face, isn’t he? Anger issues, my uvula.
Deaf to all protests, though, he then proceeds to relate how students of oriental meditation can only achieve full transcendence if their tongue is anchored behind their front teeth.
This is because of the 12 ‘meridians’, or energy channels, which – according to Chinese medicine – run through the body like invisible railway lines, converging at the tongue tip.
View the body as one big phone charger, he says. Unless you plug in the receiver (i.e. the tongue) at the correct point, the whole system gradually runs down.
Just as the tongue talks, so too, it seems the teeth chatter, and in my case the lack of an upper right canine incisor (removed in teenagehood) speaks volumes. ‘Have you had any liver problems, and have you suffered from pain on that side of your head?’
Yes to both. For example, I was recently advised that my liver finds cow’s milk hard to process. And all this before he’s seen if I need any fillings. So how way-out exactly are Dr Roberts’ theories?
‘Actually, all dental students learn not only about the the anatomy of the tongue, but about how the tongue can provide an general indication of what is happening in the rest of the body,’ says Damien Walmsley, scientific adviser to the British Dental Association.
‘For example, an enlarged tongue might be a sign of vitamin deficiency. So dentistry does not disregard the tongue.’
It just doesn’t put it at the centre of things. That said, it’s not so much Dr Roberts’s tongue theories that his fellow professionals find hard to swallow, as his opposition to metal fillings (he won’t do them, and suggests patients have them all removed).
‘I am not remotely short of patients,’ he says. ‘My appointments book is full, and people come from all over the world to see me.’
‘I should stress, though, that I don’t just take one look at someone’s tongue and give them a conclusive diagnosis. All I do is tell them if their tongue is pointing towards an area that might need addressing.
‘And don’t forget – I haven’t come up with the idea of tongue analysis off my own bat. It’s an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine, dating back many centuries.’
Speaking of which, does the dÈcor, perhaps, owe something to the East, too? ‘That’s right, we’ve had the whole place feng shui-ed,’ he beams.
‘Hence the yellow chair, the pink shirts, even the positioning of the basins for the patients to spit into. Oh yes, for me, dentistry goes much deeper than just teeth.’

Source:http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1201020/Could-tongue-tell-real-truth-health.html#ixzz0M0CYclTq

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Gelatinum Asini

Latin Plant Name:  Gelatinum Asini
Pinyin Mandarin Name: E Jiao
Pin Yin: ejiao-
Common English Name: Gelatin from the skin of an Ass
Common name:
ass hide glue
Other names: A Jiao, Yuan E Jiao, Chen E Jiao, Lu Pi Jiao, Lu E Jiao, Dong E Jiao, Ah Jao
Botanical family: (animal) Equidae
Botanical name: Equs asinus L.
Part of Plant Used: Prepared gelatin
Primary action: Supplement Blood
Secondary actions: Stop Bleeding; Supplement Yin
Temperature: neutral
Nature: Neutral
Taste: Sweet
Entering Channel: Lu, Lv, Kd

Meridians Entered: Lungs, Liver, Kidneys
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Common Usages : This herb is used to stop chronic bleeding and enhance recovery from excessive bleeding. It is most often used in formulas that treat anemia, tuberculosis, dry cough with bloody sputum, bleeding fibroids, and endometriosis; also used to raise blood platelet count, and to stop bleeding and spotting during pregnancy (TCM: builds Lung Yin and nourishes Blood).

Nourishes Blood; used especially for dizziness, palpitations, and dry skin.
Stops bleeding of all types, especially in conditions of chronic wasting illnesses and Vacuity of Yin or Blood.
Supplements Yin and moistens Lungs, especially useful for the aftermath of feverish illness.

Traditional Usages and Functions
: Nourishes Blood; nourishes Blood and stops bleeding; nourishes Yin and moistens Lungs.

Common Formulas Used In : Leonuris and Achyranthes.

Processing Required : Can be used after processing

Remarks
Dissolve the gelatin in warm water before adding it to tea, or use alone after straining.

Cautions in Use
Do not use this herb where there is an exterior excess condition. Use with caution if there is deficent Spleen and/or Stomach.

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The Official MartinZ Blog :

Resources:
http://www.acupuncture-and-chinese-medicine.com/gelatinum-asini.html
http://www.chineseherbacademy.org/databases/hb-db/asini.html
http://www.tcmassistant.com/herbs/e-jiao.html

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Oyster Shell

Latin Plant Name: Concha Ostreae

Pinyin Mandarin Name: Mu Li

Common English Name:  Oyster Shell

Parts Used : Whole shell (crushed)

Nature: Cool

Taste :Salty, astringent

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Meridians Entered: Liver, Kidneys

Common Usages:   Oyster shell is used in formulas to treat irritability with associated symptoms of palpitations, insomnia, and anxiety, and sometimes ringing in the ears, blurred vision, and flushed face (TCM: Yin deficiency); also used to treat night sweats, nocturnal emissions, heartburn, and goiter.

Traditional Usages and Functions:  Settles and calms Spirit; benefits Yin and restrains floating Yang; prevents leakage of fluids; softens hardness and dissipates nodules; absorbs acidity and alleviates pain.

Common Formulas Used InBupleurum and Dragon Bone; Tang Gui and Indigo.

Processing Required : Must be used after proper processing

Cautions in Use :  Do not use where there is high fever with no sweatin
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Oyster Shell Calcium 500 +D – Bone Health

Calcium Oyster Shell
Calcium Oyster Shell Oral

Oyster Shell Calcium

Resources:
http://www.acupuncture-and-chinese-medicine.com/oyster-shell.html

 

Acupuncture is Just as Effective Without Needles

Needles

Acupuncture works, but it appears to work equally well with or without needle penetration. This conclusion was drawn from a treatment study involving cancer patients suffering from nausea during radiotherapy.

In a series of acupuncture studies that involved more than 200 patients who were undergoing radiation treatment, roughly half received traditional acupuncture with needles penetrating the skin in particular points, while the others received simulated acupuncture instead, with a telescopic, blunt placebo needle that merely touched their skin.

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Afterwards, 95 percent of the patients in both groups felt that the treatment had helped relieve nausea, and 67 percent had experienced other positive effects such as improved sleep, brighter mood, and less pain. Both groups felt considerably better than a separate control group that received no acupuncture of any kind.

The acupuncture was performed by physiotherapists two or three times a week during the five week long period of their radiation treatment.

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