Tag Archives: Advanced Micro Devices

Truths about protecting our eyes

 

Fact: Eye exercises will not improve or preserve vision or reduce the need for glasses. Your vision depends on many factors, including the shape of your eyeball and the health of the eye tissues, neither of which can be significantly altered with eye exercises.
As the eyes age, problems with vision become more common. Learn how to recognize the risk factors and symptoms of specific eye diseases cataract, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy — and what steps one can take to prevent or treat them before your vision deteriorates.

Myth: Reading in dim light will worsen our vision.

Fact: Dim lighting will not damage our eyesight. However, it will tire our eyes out more quickly. The best way to position a reading light is to have it shine directly onto the page, not over the shoulder. A desk lamp with an opaque shade pointing directly at the reading material is ideal.

Myth: Carrots are the best food for the eyes.

Fact: Carrots, which contain vitamin A, are indeed good for the eyes. But fresh fruits and dark green leafy vegetables, which contain more antioxidant vitamins such as C and E, are even better. Antioxidants may even help protect the eyes against cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Just don’t expect them to prevent or correct basic vision problems such as nearsightedness or farsightedness.

Myth: It’s best not to wear glasses or contact lenses all the time. Taking a break from them allows our eyes to rest.

Fact: If we need glasses or contacts for distance vision or reading, we should use them. Not wearing glasses will strain our eyes and tire them out instead of resting them. However, it will not worsen our vision or lead to eye disease.

Myth: Staring at a computer screen all day is bad for the eyes.

Fact: Using a computer does not damage our eyes. However, staring at a computer screen all day can contribute to eyestrain or tired eyes. People who stare at a computer screen for long periods tend not to blink as often as usual, which can cause the eyes to feel dry and uncomfortable. To help prevent eyestrain, we should adjust the lighting so it doesn’t create a glare or harsh reflection on the screen, it is advised to rest the eyes briefly every 20 minutes, and make a conscious effort to blink regularly so that our eyes stay well lubricated.

It can be a frightening moment. When the doctor diagnoses an eye disease such as glaucoma, cataract, or AMD, we immediately worry about losing our sight or becoming seriously vision-impaired.

It’s important to know what to do not only when disease strikes, but what to do before and after. We should know the warning signs and how a diagnosis is made. And the best treatment options for that.

The good news is, with the proper treatment decisions, those eye diseases can be addressed and controlled and their potential to compromise our sight can be halted.

Our eyes do change as we get older. That’s a truth we can do little about. It’s the consequences we can change.
We we should learn all the facts about treating adult eye diseases.

Resources:
Harvard Health Publication
Harvard Medical School

Advertisements

Lysimachia foenum-graecum

Botanical Name: Lysimachia foenum-graecum
Family: Primulaceae
Subfamily: Myrsinoideae
Genus: Lysimachia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Common Name: Ling Xiang Cao

Habitat ; Lysimachia foenum-graecum is native to E. Asia – China . It grows on wet mixed forests, streams in mountain valleys, humus-rich soils; 800–1700 m. N Guangdong, Guangxi, SW Hunan, SE Yunnan.
Description:
Lysimachia foenum-graecum is a perennial herb , 20–60 cm tall, curry-scented when dry. Stems ascending to erect from creeping base, herbaceous, angular or narrowly winged. Leaves alternate; upper leaves often 1–2 X as large as lower leaves; petiole 5–12 mm; leaf blade broadly ovate to elliptic, 4–11 X 2–6 cm, sparsely minutely brown glandular, base attenuate to broadly cuneate, margin obscurely undulate, apex acute to subobtuse and apiculate; veins 3 or 4 pairs; veinlets inconspicuous. Pedicel 2.5–4 cm. Flowers solitary, axillary. Calyx lobes ovate-lanceolate to lanceolate, 7–12 X 2.5–5 mm, ± minutely brown glandular, apex acuminate to subulate. Corolla yellow, 1.2–1.7 cm, 2–3.5 cm in diam., deeply parted; lobes oblong, 11–16 X 6–9 mm, apex obtuse. Filaments connate basally into a ca. 0.5 mm high ring, free parts very short; anthers 4–5 mm, basifixed, opening by apical pores. Capsule subglobose, 6–7 mm in diam. Fl. May.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain. The dried plant has a curry-like aroma[266]. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. An easily grown plant, succeeding in a moist loamy soil. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Most species in this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow autumn in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring or autumn. Larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Medicinal Uses: Antihalitosis. The root is used.

You may Click & see .—->...(1)  ...(2) 

Other Uses :….Incense…..The root is used to scent the hair. Used as a perfume

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysimachia_foenum-graecum
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200017018
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Lysimachia+foenum-graecum

Ocular Histoplasmosis

Definition:
Ocular histoplasmosis is  an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss, due to the spread of spores of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum (histo) from the lungs to the eye where they lodge in the choroid (a layer of blood vessels that provides blood and nutrients to the retina).

click to see the pictures

There the spores cause fragile, abnormal blood vessels to grow underneath the retina. These abnormal blood vessels form a lesion known as choroidal neovascularization (CNV). If left untreated, the CNV can turn into scar tissue and replace the normal retinal tissue in the macula (the central part of the retina that provides sharp central vision. If these abnormal blood vessels grow toward the center of the macula, they may affect a tiny depression called the fovea (the region of the retina with the highest concentration of special retinal nerve cells, called cones, that produce sharp, daytime vision). Damage to the fovea and the cones can severely impair, and even destroy, straight-ahead vision. Since the syndrome rarely affects side, or peripheral vision, the disease does not cause total blindness.

It’s a common problem in the USA, particularly in a region now known as the ‘Histo belt’, which includes Arkansas, Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee and West Virginia, where as many as 90 per cent of the population have had the infection.

Symptoms:
Many patients with histo spots in their eyes have no symptoms. Others may experience the following:

 

*Distorted vision…....CLICK & SEE
*Blind spots
*Scars in the retina, ranging in severity

Causes:
Histoplasmosis is caused by a fungus commonly found in the dust and soil of the Mississippi-Ohio River Valley region.  Approximately 62% of the adult population living in this region are carriers. It affects men and women equally.

Histoplasmosis is contracted by inhaling dust that carries the fungal spores. Its effect on the body can vary widely in severity from one person to another.  Many carriers have no symptoms at all, but those with mild exposure may experience flu-like symptoms and mild respiratory infections. Histoplasmosis is more likely to become a serious problem in people who already have a weakened immune system.

The fungus may affect the eye by causing small areas of inflammation and scarring of the retina. These are called “histo spots” and may be found in both eyes. Their affect on vision depends on the location of the scars.  Scarring in the peripheral area of the retina may have little or no impact on vision, while a central scar affecting the macula may cause a prominent blind spot.

Most people with histo spots in the retina are totally unaware of their presence unless the central vision is affected. Studies indicate that only about 5% of those with histo spots are at risk of losing vision. Scientists have been unable find a link between the patients with minor histo spots and those who develop a severe loss of their central vision.

The syndrome is thought to be linked to hypersensitivity to Histoplasma capsulatum, rather than a direct exposure of the eyes to the micro-organism, but some experts have found DNA or genetic material from the fungus in a layer of the eyeball known as the choroid, and suspect fungal spores may lodge here and cause problems.

Risk Factors:
Some people go on to develop symptoms – usually of lung disease, although the fungus may spread to other organs – known as disseminated histoplasmosis and this can be fatal.

Very rarely the organism can spread to the eye to cause acute ocular histoplasmosis, which needs urgent treatment with antifungal medicine.

Ocular histoplasmosis can cause blindness, although it mostly affects central vision and rarely involves peripheral vision so total blindness is rare. Anyone who has lived in an area where they may have been exposed to histoplasmosis and develops eye problems must be checked for the condition.The loss of vision in POHS is caused by choroidal neovascularization.

Diagnosis:
Ocular histoplasmosis is detected with a dilated examination of the retina using ophthalmoscopy. It is usually diagnosed based on its distinctive appearance and characteristics. Fluorescein angiography is required for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with POHS.

Treatment:
Treatment requires careful consideration of FA findings and few cases may respond to corticosteroids and laser photocoagulation. A vitreo-retinal specialist should be consulted for proper management of the case.

Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have been successfully treated by the drug Bevacizumab (trade name Avastin, Genentech/Roche). Ophthalmologists are using Avastin “off-label” to treat AMD and similar conditions since research indicates that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the causes for the growth of the abnormal vessels that cause these conditions. Some patients treated with Avastin had less fluid and more normal-appearing maculas, and their vision improved. Avastin injections into the affected eye have been used by retina specialists since early 2005. Thus there is no long term 10 to 15 year follow up data for possible late complications. Early treatment is critical to maintaining vision.

Other treatments include Ranibizumab (trade name Lucentis) which is approved by the FDA for intraocular use. Lucentis uses a smaller molecule compared to Avastin and according to GenenTech, the smaller molecule helps lower the systemic toxicity of the drug, thereby lowering the overall risks compared to Avastin. However, Lucentis costs approximately $1,600 per injection compared to less than $100 per injection for Avastin. Research has shown  that Avastin and Lucentis to be equally effective in the treatment of POHS and AMD.

To get the best effect, the whole area affected by ocular histoplasmosis has to be treated.

Once a person has ocular histoplasmosis, they have it for life.

Regular eye exams and routine use of an Amsler Grid to monitor central vision is recommended for anyone with histo spots.

Click to learn more

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Presumed_ocular_histoplasmosis_syndrome
http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=24114
http://www.stlukeseye.com/Conditions/histoplasmosis.html
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/ocularhistoplasmosis.shtml

Enhanced by Zemanta

The Amazing Nutrient that Lowers Your Blood Pressure

Research has recently found that vitamin D has a protective effect against arterial stiffness and impaired blood vessel relaxation.

CLICK & SEE

Study participants with reduced levels of vitamin D had increased arterial stiffness and vascular function impairment. However, among those whose vitamin D levels were normalized over a six month period, vascular health improved and blood pressure measurements declined.

Science Newsline Reports:

“The results add to evidence that lack of vitamin D can lead to impaired vascular health, contributing to high blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

In related news, researchers have also found that high level of vitamin D could be protective against the development of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of vision loss in adults.

In women younger than 75, those who had 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations lower than 38 nanomoles per liter were more likely to have age-related macular degeneration than women with concentrations greater than 38 nanomoles per liter.

Resources:
*Science Newsline April 4, 2011
*Archives of Ophthalmology April 2011; 129(4): 481-489
*MSNBC April 27, 2011
*Science Daily March 21, 2011
*Journal of General Internal Medicine April 21, 2011 [Epub ahead of print]
*Diabetes Care May 2011;34(5):1133-8
*Journal of General Internal Medicine March 15, 2011 [Epub ahead of print]

Posted By Dr. Mercola | April 30 2011

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Surgery For AMD Patients

An innovative form of eye surgery is offering hope to the estimated three million sufferers of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in people over 55 in the UK.
…………………...CLICK & SEE
The technique, known as IOL VIP – Intra-Ocular Lenses for Visually Impaired People, is similar to cataract surgery. Developed in Milan by low-vision specialists and ophthalmologists, it was first made available in the UK about 18 months ago and is now performed in private hospitals, although it isn’t currently available on the NHS.

AMD damages the macula – the central part of the light-sensitive retina at the back of the eye – causing scarring, and preventing images being sent to the brain. This damage causes the gradual deterioration, or even loss, of central vision used for activities such as reading, writing, driving and recognising faces.
Eye

Hope: Treatment is now available for ‘dry’ AMD

There are two types of AMD: ‘dry’, the most common form, in which the cells of the macula disintegrate gradually; and the more aggressive ‘wet’ form. The latter is caused by the growth of new blood vessels behind the retina, which can leak, causing scarring and leading to loss of sight.

About ten per cent of people with AMD develop the ‘wet’ form, which can be treated with eye injections. But, until recently, there has been no effective treatment for the majority, who suffer from ‘dry’ AMD.

In the pioneering IOL VIP procedure, two artificial lenses are inserted into the eye. The natural lens behind the iris is removed and replaced with an artificial one, which diverts images from the scarred macula to healthy retinal tissue.

A second lens is then placed in front of the iris. Together, the two lenses act as a telescope, allowing the images to be focused and processed to the optic nerve and sent to the brain. The procedure can last as little as 30 minutes. It then takes approximately 12 weeks for sight to stabilise.

After the operation, computer vision training is vital to train the eye and get the best possible outcome.

Richard Newsom, a consultant ophthalmic surgeon, says: ‘The IOL VIP procedure is an exciting new innovation. It’s not appropriate for every patient with AMD and further studies are required but when it works, it works well and for some patients it can make a significant improvement to their vision.’

Brendan Moriarty, consultant eye surgeon at Leighton Hospital in Crewe, Cheshire, who was the first to perform the operation in the UK, says: ‘If you select patients correctly, the vast majority will at least double their near and distance vision.’

The Royal College of Ophthalmologists agrees further studies are required, stating that it is difficult to determine who will benefit and by how much.

The Macular Disease Society says it is not ‘a miracle cure’ and ‘has worked successfully for some but can’t be regarded as a regular new treatment for widespread use in MD patients’.

One patient who has benefited from the pioneering procedure, however, is 68-year-old Evelyn Dean.

Having suffered from ‘dry’ AMD for two-and-a-half years, Evelyn’s sight had deteriorated so much that she couldn’t read a book or newspaper-without a strong magnifying glass. To her dismay, it also got so bad she was told that she could no longer drive.

But, following an IOL VIP operation in November 2008 at Spire Hull and East Riding Hospital, Evelyn has been given the all-clear to get back behind the wheel.

She says: ‘ I can even read the labels on supermarket shelves properly, which I couldn’t before. I still wear glasses for long distances and reading but the best thing is being able to drive again after almost 15 months.

‘I feel like I have my freedom back.’

Sources: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1200549/New-surgery-save-thousands-blindness.html#ixzz0LiXZkEUz

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]