Tag Archives: Americans

Some Health Problems & solutions

Contraception:-

Q: We have one child and do not want any more. I don’t like to use condoms, take hormones or have an IUD (intra uterine device) inserted. Can I use the I-pill regularly?

A: Emergency contraceptives actually contain higher doses of hormones than regular oral contraceptive pills. It is alright to take them occasionally, for contraceptive failure or rape. Regular usage as a method of contraception results in side effects such as bleeding, change of cycle dates, nausea, headache and breast tenderness. Eventually, despite emergency contraception, ovulation may occur resulting in pregnancy. If you don’t like any of the usual methods of contraception, you could try withdrawal, though that has a 60-70 per cent failure rate. Alternatively one of you could opt for a permanent method like sterilisation.

KNUCKLE RAP:-

Q: I love to crack my knuckles but someone told me that it causes arthritis. It has become a habit so I keep doing it!

A:Tiny air bubbles get trapped in the joint space and these burst producing the sounds. It does not cause arthritis. That is an old wives’ tale, probably propagooated by people who cannot bear the popping sound.

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Migraine meds:-

Q: I get headaches once or twice a month. After checking my eyes, sinuses and doing a CT scan, the doctor said it is migraine.

A: Migraines are fairly typical and can be suspected clinically. Sometimes they start with a strange sensation or an aura like bright lights, which can last for up to an hour. The headache itself usually lasts for 4-72 hours and can end in vomiting. If you get the headaches only once or twice a month then you can take the medication that the doctor prescribed at the time of the headache. Some people need continuous maintenance treatment to prevent the headaches. In addition, lying down in a dark quiet room, applying hot and cold compresses to the forehead and temples and having a cup of coffee can help to reduce the intensity and duration of the headache.

Garlic breath?:-

Q: I have bad breath and I am very conscious of it. I feel people move out of the way as I approach. I use mouthwash and floss regularly but it does not help.

A: You need to consult a dentist to see if you have cavities or gum disease. If this is not the case, bad breath can be a symptom of tonsillitis, sinusitis, diabetes, liver or kidney disease. Sometimes it is what you eat — such as garlic and other spices in your food — which contributes to the smell.

Wash it off:-

Q: My scalp itches a great deal.

A:An itchy scalp may be due to dandruff, lice, seborrhic dermatitis, eczema or simply not washing your hair at least every other day. You need to show it to a dermatologist. Dandruff usually responds well to OTC shampoos. It is better to buy two different brands and alternate them.

Vein trouble:-

Q: I have ugly varicose veins in both my legs. What can I do?

A:Wear compression stockings during the day. When sleeping, elevate feet above the level of the heart. If the veins are cosmetically unappealing, or there are ulcers or clots, surgery, laser treatment or sclerotherapy can be considered. Walking and stretching regularly can prevent varicose veins from developing.

Sources: The telegraph (Kolkata ,India)

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Ciliosemina pedunculata

Botanical Name: Ciliosemina pedunculata
Family: Rubiaceae
Subfamily: Cinchonoideae
Tribe: Cinchoneae
Genus: Ciliosemina
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms: Cinchona pedunculata H.Karst. Ladenbergia pedunculata (H.Karst.) K.Schum. Remijia pedunculata (H.Kar

Common Name: Ciliosemina

Habitat : Ciliosemina pedunculata is native to S. America – northern Brazil, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela. It grows in light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Description: Ciliosemina pedunculata is an evergreen Shrub growing to 3 m (9ft) by 3 m (9ft). These are woody plants taking the form of shrubs or trees. The white flowers are borne in axillary inflorescences. The fruits are stiff capsules containing winged seeds.

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Cultivation: The plant can be grown in light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Propagation: Seeds.

Medicinal Uses:
The bark is a source of quinine. Quinine contains the alkaloids quinine and quinidine. It is a very effective treatment for fevers, and especially as a treatment and preventative of malaria. The bark is a bitter, astringent herb that lowers fevers, relaxes spasms, is antimalarial (the alkaloid quinine) and slows the heart (the alkaloid quinidine). The bark is made into various preparations, such as tablets, liquid extracts, tinctures and powders. It is used internally in the treatment of malaria, neuralgia, muscle cramps and cardiac fibrillation. It is an ingredient in various proprietary cold and influenza remedies. It is also used as a gargle to treat sore throat
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciliosemina
http://www.wikiwand.com/de/R%C3%B6tegew%C3%A4chse
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ciliosemina+pedunculata

Carapichea ipecacuanha

Botanical Name : Carapichea ipecacuanha
Family: Rubiaceae
Subfamily: Rubioideae
Tribe: Psychotrieae
Genus: Carapichea
Species: C. ipecacuanha
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Synonyms:
*Callicocca ipecacuanha
*Cephaelis ipecacuanha
*Evea ipecacuanha
*Psychotria ipecacuanha
*Uragoga ipecacuanha

Common Name: Ipecac, Its common name, ipecacuanha

Habitat: Carapichea ipecacuanha is native to Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, and Brazil. is derived from the Tupi ipega’kwãi, or “road-side sick-making plant”.
Description:
Carapichea ipecacuanha is an evergreen Shrub growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in) at a medium rate. It has a slender stem which grows partly underground and is often procumbent at the base, the lower portion being knotted.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soils.

It can grow in full shade (deep woodland) or semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Prefers a minimum temperature in the range of 15 – 18 degree centigrade . Prefers a well-drained humus-rich soil and a shady position. Plants need ample moisture and humidity if they are to thrive.

Propagation:
Seed – Greenwood cuttings in a sandy compost. Root cuttings.

Medicinal Uses:
The roots of ipecac contain a number of medically active constituents including isoquinoline alkaloids, tannins and glycosides. They have a violently irritant action, stimulating the gastric and bronchial systems, lowering fevers and preventing cyst formation in amoebic dysentery. The roots are used internally in the treatment of coughs, bronchitis, whooping cough and amoebic dysentery. One of the surest of emetics, even moderate doses will induce vomiting until the contents of the stomach have been voided making it especially useful in the treatment of drug overdoses. It is used in a syrup to induce vomiting in children who have ingested toxins. Smaller doses are strongly expectorant and it is a common ingredient in patent cough medicines. The plant needs to be used with caution since excess causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea. The roots are harvested, usually when about 3 years old and the plants are in flower, and are dried for later use. The plants are replanted after partial removal of the roots. The plant is used in homeopathy in the treatment of nausea.
Known Hazards: The plant can be toxic in doses larger than recommended for medicinal use.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carapichea_ipecacuanha
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Carapichea+ipecacuanha

Prunus cocomilia

Botanical Name : Prunus cocomilia
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Species: P. cocomilia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms: P. pseudoarmeniaca Heldr. & Sartori

Common Name: Italian plum

Habitat : Prunus cocomilia is native to Albania, Croatia, Greece, southern Italy (including Sicily), Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and western Turkey. It grows on hedgerows in the mountains of N. Italy and the Balkans.

Description:
Prunus cocomilia is a deciduous Shrub growing to 5 m (16ft 5in).It is in flower in April. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

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Cultivation:
Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Succeeds in sun or partial shade though it fruits better in a sunny position. This species is closely related to P. cerasifera. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Seed.

Fruit – raw or cooked. A bitter or sour flavour. The fruit is rarely produced in Britain. The fruit is about 2cm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes below on toxicity.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses: Dye……..A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit.

Known Hazards: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cocomilia
http://www.pfaf.org/USER/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+cocomilia

Prunus cerasus austera

Botanical Name : Prunus cerasus austera
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Prunus
Subgenus: Cerasus
Species: P. cerasus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Name : Morello Cherry

Habitat : Prunus cerasus austera is native to S.E. Europe to W. Asia. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure.

Description:
Prunus cerasus austera is a deciduous Tree growing to 9 m (29ft 6in).It is in flower in May, and the seeds ripen in July. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.The plant is self-fertile.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soils.
Cultivation:
Thrives in a well-drained moisture-retentive loamy soil. Prefers some lime in the soil but is likely to become chlorotic if too much lime is present. Prefers an acid soil according to another report. Succeeds in sun or partial shade though it fruits better in a sunny position. Plants succeed when grown against a north-facing wall, the fruit ripens later in this position thus extending the season. Hardy to about -20°c. This subspecies covers the cultivated bitter cherries known as Morello cherries. They have been long cultivated for their edible fruit and there are several named varieties. Most members of this genus are shallow-rooted and will produce suckers if the roots are damaged. Plants produce suckers freely. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires 2 – 3 months cold stratification and is best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Protect the seed from mice etc. The seed can be rather slow, sometimes taking 18 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in a greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter and plant them out in late spring or early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in a frame. Softwood cuttings from strongly growing plants in spring to early summer in a frame. Layering in spring. Division of suckers during the dormant season. They can be planted out direct into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Fruit; Oil; Oil; Seed.
Fruit – raw or cooked. The fruit is neither bitter nor sweet, but is pleasantly acid and it can be eaten out of hand, used in pies, preserves etc or dried for later use. The fruit has a dark juice. The fruit is about 18mm in diameter and contains one large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. Do not eat the seed if it is too bitter – see the notes  below on toxicity. An edible oil is obtained from the seed. When refined it is used as a salad oil[183]. The leaves are used as a tea substitute. A gum obtained from the trunk is used for chewing.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, all members of the genus contain amygdalin and prunasin, substances which break down in water to form hydrocyanic acid (cyanide or prussic acid). In small amounts this exceedingly poisonous compound stimulates respiration, improves digestion and gives a sense of well-being.
Other Uses:
Adhesive; Dye; Gum; Gum; Hedge; Hedge; Oil; Oil; Wood.

An edible drying oil obtained from the seed is also used in cosmetics. The gum obtained from the stem is also used as an adhesive. Plants can be grown as a hedge, succeeding in fairly exposed positions. A green dye can be obtained from the leaves. A dark grey to green dye can be obtained from the fruit.
Known Hazards: Although no specific mention has been seen for this species, it belongs to a genus where most, if not all members of the genus produce hydrogen cyanide, a poison that gives almonds their characteristic flavour. This toxin is found mainly in the leaves and seed and is readily detected by its bitter taste. It is usually present in too small a quantity to do any harm but any very bitter seed or fruit should not be eaten. In small quantities, hydrogen cyanide has been shown to stimulate respiration and improve digestion, it is also claimed to be of benefit in the treatment of cancer. In excess, however, it can cause respiratory failure and even death.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Respouces:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_cerasus
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Prunus+cerasus+austera