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Ribes cynosbati

Botanical Name : Ribes cynosbati
Family: Grossulariaceae
Genus: Ribes
Species: R. cynosbati
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Saxifragales

Synonyms: Grossularia cynosbati (L.) Mill., Ribes cynosbati var. atrox Fernald, Ribes cynosbati f. atrox (Fernald) B. Boivin

Common Names: Prickly gooseberry, Eastern prickly gooseberry, Dogberry, Dog bramble, and Groseillier des chiens (in Quebec)

Habitat :Ribes cynosbati is native to Eastern N. America – New Brunswick to North Carolina, west to Manitoba, Alabama and Missouri. It grows on Open, loamy or rocky woods.

Description:
Ribes cynosbati is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1.5 m (5ft) with erect to spreading stems. Leaves have 3 or 5 lobes, with glandular hairs. Flowers are greenish-white, and the bristly fruits white to greenish and pleasant-tasting.
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It and is not frost tender. It is in flower in April. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
Easily grown in a moisture retentive but well-drained loamy soil of at least moderate quality. Plants are quite tolerant of shade though do not fruit so well in such a position. Hardy to about -20°c. A parent of the cultivated American gooseberry, it is occasionally cultivated in America for its edible fruit. It does not tend to fruit very heavily in Britain. The ssp. R. cynosbati inerme. Rehd. has a fruit that is without bristles. Plants can harbour a stage of white pine blister rust, so should not be grown in the vicinity of pine trees. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires 4 – 5 months cold stratification at between -2 to +2°c and should be sown as early in the year as possible. Under normal storage conditions the seed can remain viable for 17 years or more. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter, planting them out in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 10 – 15cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year’s growth, preferably with a heel of the previous year’s growth, November to February in a cold frame or sheltered bed outdoors

Edible Uses:
Fruit – raw or cooked. A pleasant sub-acid flavour, good for quenching thirst, they also make excellent pies, jellies and preserves. A gooseberry. The fruit can also be dried for later use. The fruit is about 10mm in diameter and is covered with short weak bristles.
Medicinal Uses:

Ophthalmic; Women’s complaints.

The root or the root bark has been used in the treatment of uterine problems caused by having too many children. An infusion of the root has been used as a wash for sore eyes.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ribes_cynosbati
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ribes+cynosbati

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Zanthoxylum nitidum

Botanical Name : Zanthoxylum nitidum
Family: Rutaceae
Genus: Zanthoxylum
Species:Z. nitidum
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Sapindales

Synonyms:
*Fagara hamiltoniana (Wall.) Engl.
*Fagara nitida Roxb.
*Fagara warburgii Perkins
*Zanthoxylum hamiltonianum Wall.
*Zanthoxylum hirtellum Ridl.
*Zanthoxylum torvum F. Muell.

Common Name: Shiny-leaf prickly-ash. In Assamese it is known as Tez-mui and Tejamool. It is also called Liang mian zhen

Habitat : Zanthoxylum nitidum is native to South China, southeast Asia, and northern Australia. It is one of thirteen Zanthoxylum species found in India.It grows in shrubby thickets.

Description:
Z. nitidum is a “morphologically variable” prickly shrub. Sometimes it is an evergreen Climber.The leaves are made up of several leathery oval leaflets which are up to 12 by 8 centimeters (5 by 3 inches) in size. It is aromatic. Flowers, which occur in the leaf axils, have yellow-green petals a few millimeters long. The fruit is a red-brown follicle.

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It is in leaf 12-Jan. The flowers are dioecious (individual flowers are either male or female, but only one sex is to be found on any one plant so both male and female plants must be grown if seed is required)The plant is not self-fertile.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
The plant prefers a good deep well-drained moisture retentive soil in full sun or semi-shade. Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required. Flowers are formed on the old wood.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in the autumn. Stored seed may requires up to 3 months cold stratification, though scarification may also help. Sow stored seed in a cold frame as early in the year as possible. Germination should take place in late spring, though it might take another 12 months. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Root cuttings, 3cm long, planted horizontally in pots in a greenhouse. Good percentage. Suckers, removed in late winter and planted into their permanent positions.
Chemical constituents:
The plant contains the chemical compounds nitidine, toddalolactone, and chelerythrine.The essential oil, at least from some varieties, contains limonene and geraniol.

Medicinal Uses:
Z. nitidum is one several species of Zanthoxylum that are used in traditional medicine in various parts of the world.The root of zanthoxylum nitidum is anodyne, antiphlogistic, carminative, depurative. The plant is analgesic and antirheumatic. The resin contained in the bark, and especially in that of the roots, is powerfully stimulant and tonic.
Other Uses:
Z. nitidum is used as an insecticide and a piscicide. In India and Nepal, the fruits are used as a condiment. It has been added to toothpaste to enhance its efficacy.
Known Hazards: Plants are slightly toxic

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zanthoxylum_nitidum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Zanthoxylum+nitidum

Artemisia sieversiana

Botanical Name :Artemisia sieversiana
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus : Artemisia
Species:A. sieversiana

Common names: Sievers wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia sieversiana is native to E. Asia – Himalayas from Pakistan to C. Nepal. It grows on stony ground, especially in Ladakh, and also in dry areas of Nepal, 1500 – 4100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia sieversiana is a annual/perennial plant, growing to 0.8 m (2ft 6in). Leaves are more or less triangular in outline with more acute leaf lobes and a deeply grooved, nearly angled stem. It is in flower from Aug to October, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

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It is well-known for instance in the Czech Republic (Hejný 1964) and Ukrain (Mosyakin 1990).
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation :
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: One report says that the plant is edible but does not say what part of the plant.

Medicinal Uses:

Anthelmintic; Antirheumatic; Antiseptic; Deobstruent; Emmenagogue; Febrifuge; Skin; Tonic.

The leaves and flowering stems are anthelmintic, deobstruent, emmenagogue, febrifuge and tonic. Externally, they are used as an antiseptic and discutient. A decoction of the plant, combined with Ajuga lupulina and Ephedra gerardiana, is used as a wash to relieve painful joints. A paste of the roots is applied to boils.
Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+sieversiana
https://vi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_sieversiana
http://www.nies.go.jp/biodiversity/invasive/DB/detail/80430e.html
http://alienplantsbelgium.be/content/artemisia-sieversiana

Artemisia glacialis

Botanical Name: Artemisia glacialis
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Artemisia
Species:A. glacialis
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asterales
Common Name : Glacier Wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia glacialis is native to C. Europe. It grows on exposed rocky slopes in the Alps. Schistose rocks and screes, 2000 – 3100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia glacialis is a perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.3 m (1ft). The foilages are herbiculas and aeromatic and the plant is deer resistant.

The flower color is yellow & blooms during mid summer.The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Requires a very well-drained light or medium soil and a sunny position. Very intolerant of winter wet. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Indiscriminate collection of this plant from the wild has made it an endangered species. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out[200]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: The herb is used as a flavouring in vermouth and liqueurs.
Medicinal Uses:

Digestive; Expectorant; Sedative; Stomachic.

Glacier wormwood has similar medicinal properties to common wormwood, A, absinthum. It is used locally where it grows wild. The whole plant is digestive, expectorant, sedative and stomachic. An infusion of the herb has a marked effect upon mountain sickness. A poultice of the plant is used as a first-aid remedy in the treatment of wounds.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resours:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_glacialis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+glacialis
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51554/

Leucophyllum texanum

Botanical Name : Leucophyllum texanum
Family: Scrophulariaceae
Genus: Leucophyllum
Species:Leucophyllum texanum
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Cycadophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Lamiales

Common Name : Sage, Purple
The Mexican name of this plant, Mr. O. informs us, is pronounced “Sanesa.” This signifies “the tree that is of the color of ashes,” that is to say, silvery gray. The botanical name has ihe same meaning, and is from the color of the leaves. This name will be considered a hard name, and only for the fact that the people who give common names to plants, have not the slightest respect for the writer who trespasses on their prerogative, it might be suggested that ” Silver bush ” would be a good common name for it. ” Silver tree ” will not do, as that is already appropriated by an African tree, Leucadendron ar-genteum.
Habitat : The plant occurs in Philadelphia & southern Texas. As in its native habitat it is found only upon soil so calcareous as to be quite barren, it has been naturally presumed that it would not flourish in the better soils sought by the horticulturists. But experience proves that it will succeed in any good soil that has proper drainage. In fact, soil and culture seem to help it as much as they do any other plant.

Description:
Leucophyllum texanum is a broad-leaved evergreen loose growing, straggling shrubb, never attaining a height of over 6 feet, with leaves even more silvered than the Deodar, with such a profusion of purple flowers at short intervals, during the entire growing season. The shrub is capable of bright effects in ornamental grounds. The flowers of leucophyllum texanum bloom in spring and summer.The bloomed flowers have various sheds like silver, ash etc.

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Medicinal Uses: The dried leaves and flowers can be brewed into a pleasant herbal tea that is said to be mildly sedative and good as a bedtime drink or for treating colds and flus.
Other Uses: Like privet, box, or pittosporum, it can be sheared to any desired form and compactness. Also its blooming qualities are not at all impaired by severe shearing. Whether sheared to a globular, pyramidal, conical, or any other form suggested by the fancy, the contrast afforded by this Leucophyllum with the various shades of green, imparts an element of beauty to a landscape, that is but feebly imitated by any other shrub in use. It would make a fine border to a carriage drive.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://chestofbooks.com/gardening-horticulture/Gardener-Monthly-V28/Leucophyllum-Texanum.html
http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/84800/84828/84828_leucophyll_t.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm