Tag Archives: Artemisia

Tarragon

Botanical Name : Artemisia dracunculus
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. dracunculus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Synonyms: Little Dragon, Mugwort. , (French) Herbe au Dragon.

Common Names: Tarragon.

Other names: Dragon’s wort, Herbaceous Sagewort, Pinon Wormwood, Wild Tarragon

Informal names for distinguishing the variations include “French tarragon” (best for culinary use), “Russian tarragon” (typically better than wild tarragon but not as good as so-called French tarragon for culinary use), and “wild tarragon” (covers various states).

Habitat : Tarragon is found natively in a number of areas of the Northern Hemisphere.It originates from cetral Asia.

Description:
Tarragon is a perennial herb .It grows to 120–150 cm tall, with slender branched stems. The leaves are lanceolate, 2–8 cm long and 2–10 mm broad, glossy green, with an entire margin. The flowers are produced in small capitulae 2–4 mm diameter, each capitulum containing up to 40 yellow or greenish-yellow florets. French tarragon, however, seldom produces any flowers (or seeds). Some tarragon plants produce seeds that are generally only sterile. Others produce viable seeds. Tarragon has rhizomatous roots and it readily reproduces from the rhizomes.
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Tarragon is cultivated for use of the leaves as an aromatic culinary herb. In some other sub-species, the characteristic aroma is largely absent.

Edible Uses:
Tarragon is one of the four fines herbes of French cooking, and is particularly suitable for chicken, fish and egg dishes. Tarragon is the main flavoring component of Béarnaise sauce. Fresh, lightly bruised sprigs of tarragon are steeped in vinegar to produce tarragon vinegar.

Tarragon is used to flavor a popular carbonated soft drink in the countries of Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia and, by extension, Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan. The drink, named Tarhun , is made out of sugary tarragon concentrate and colored bright green.

In Slovenia, tarragon is used in a variation of the traditional nut roll sweet cake, called potica. In Hungary a popular kind of chicken soup is flavored with tarragon.

cis-Pellitorin, an isobutyramide eliciting a pungent taste, has been isolated from Tarragon plant

Medicinal Uses:
Parts used: The fresh or dried leaves and roots.
Chemical Constituents: A. dracunculus oil contained predominantly phenylpropanoids such as methyl chavicol (16.2%) and methyl eugenol (35.8%). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oil revealed the presence of trans-anethole (21.1%),  trans-ocimene (20.6%), limonene (12.4%), pinene (5.1%), allo-ocimene (4.8%), methyl eugenol (2.2%), -pinene (0.8%),  terpinolene (0.5%), bornyl acetate (0.5%) and bicyclogermacrene (0.5%) as the main components.

Tarragon has been used medicinally since antiquity. Traditionally, Tarragon has been used to treat tootaches, as a mild sedative, heart disease prevention aid and as an antidote for snakebites. Nowadays it is used in treatments of digestive complaints: it relieves stomach cramps, promotes appetite and production of bile. Tarragon is also used to promote menstruation, as a mild sedative and as a substitute for salt for people with high blood pressure. The root can ce used in cases of aching teeth.

Tarragon has an aromatic property reminiscent of anise, due to the presence of estragole, a known carcinogen and teratogen in mice. The European Union investigation revealed that the danger of estragole is minimal even at 100–1,000 times the typical consumption seen in humans. Estragole concentration in fresh tarragon leaves is about 2900 mg/kg.

Russian Tarragon is eaten in Persia to induce appetite.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/t/tarrag07.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_dracunculus
http://health-from-nature.net/Tarragon.html

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Artemisia lactiflora

Botanical Name : Artemisia lactiflora
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. lactiflora
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Name: White mugwort, Wild mugwort

Habitat :Artemisia lactiflora is native to E. Asia – China. It grows in forest margins, shrublands, canyons, slopes, roadsides, river banks and thickets from low elevations to 3000 metres.

Description:
Artemisia lactiflora is a vigorous clump-forming herbaceous perennial flowering plant, growing  3 to 6 ft., with plumes of creamy-white flower heads appearing in Summer and Autumn above dark green leaves. This is the only artemisia which is cultivated as much for its flowers as for its foliage. Plants grown in poor dry soil are hardier and last longer than those grown in heavy, damp soil.
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It is hardy to zone 4. It is in flower from Aug to October, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.

This plant has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit

Cultivation:      
Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly acid loamy soil, preferring a sunny position and a moisture-retentive soil. Plants are tolerant of light shade. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. There are some named varieties selected for their ornamental value. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:    
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.

Medicinal Uses:

Emmenagogue;  Tonic.

White mugwort is a bitter aromatic tonic herb. The leaves and flowering stems are used internally in traditional Chinese medicine to treat menstrual and liver disorders.

 
Known Hazards:   The plant might be poisonous in large doses. Skin contact can cause dermatitis in some people

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

 
Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_lactiflora
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+lactiflora
http://www.bethchatto.co.uk/plant%20portraits%20a/artemisia%20lactiflora.html

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Artemisia franserioides

Botanical Name :Artemisia franserioides
Family : Asteraceae
Genus : Artemisia L.
Species:  Artemisia franserioides Greene
Kingdom : Plantae
Subkingdom ; Tracheobionta
Superdivision : Spermatophyta
Division ; Magnoliophyta
Class : Magnoliopsida
Subclass : Asteridae
Order : Asterales

Common Name :Mugwort, Mountain

Habitat :Artemisia franserioides is native to North America north of Mexico.This is one of our higher elevation Sagebrushes, found at up to 10,000 feet elevation

Description:
Artemisia franserioides is a perennial herb with glabrous bipinnatifid and simply pinnatifid leaves.  Stem is Herbaceous is Not woody, lacking lignified tissues.It is flowering in the autumn.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

click to see the pictures.

Medicinal Uses:
As a cold and flu medicine it is drunk cold to settle the stomach, and hot to bring on and to reduce fever.  It also is brewed as a bitter tonic for stomach pains and acidosis from greasy and rancid foods. Also used for diarrhea.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pollenlibrary.com/Specie/Artemisia+franserioides/
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ARFR3
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_LMN.htm
http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/White%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/artemisia%20franserioides.htm

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Artemisia princeps

Botanical Name : Artemisia princeps
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. princeps
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Names :Japanese mugwort,yomogi in Japan,in China it is known as huang hua ai and in Korea, it is called ssuk or tarae ssuk

Habitat : Artemisia princeps is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea.Grows in  waste ground and thickets in lowland and low elevations, central and southern Japan.

Description;
Artemisia princeps is a perennial, very vigorous plant that grows to 1.2 meters. This species spreads rapidly by means of underground stolons and can become invasive. It bears small, buff colored flowers from July to November which are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by wind. The leaves are feather shaped, scalloped and light green, with white dense fuzz on the underside.

It is in flower from Jul to November, and the seeds ripen from Aug to November.

click to see the pictures.> …(01)   ..(1)..     ..(2)....    ….…….

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. This species spreads rapidly by means of underground stolons and can become invasive. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.

Edible uses:
Leaves and young seedlings can be eaten raw or cooked. They can also be used in salads and soups after removal of the bitterness. The young leaves can be lightly boiled before being pounded and added to glutinous rice dumplings known as mochi to which they give a pleasant colour, aroma and flavour. Mugwort mochi can be found in many North American health food stores.

Medicinal Uses:
Leaves are used to treat eczema, itchy skin and excessive womb bleeding in China.  The fuzz on the underside of the leaves is gathered and used in moxibustion in Japan. Its juice is effective at stopping bleeding, lowering fevers and purging the stomach of impurities. It can also be boiled and taken to relieve colds and coughs.  The technique of treatment for cold (diaphoretic treatment) was called Yay (oneself)-su (pan)-maw (steam)-kare (to cause to do). The decocted mugwort was boiled in a large pan. The patient sitting near the hearth holds the pan. Patient’s head needs to be covered with a hood-like cloth (a blanket would be good), covering his/her face and the pan. Then the steam/vapor causes the patient to perspire. Sometimes the patient drinks the decoction to accelerate the process. The process lasts for 5 to 8 minutes depending upon the steam flow and condition of the patient. The patient perspires profusely.  Ainu people used to treat venereal disease such as syphilis and gonorrhea with mugwort plants. Washing genitals with leaves and stems of mugwort or/and drinking the decoction were found to be effective for controlling such venereal diseases.   Some eye diseases were treated with leaves of mugwort plant. Broiled leaves of the plant used to be attached to the eyelid of the affected eyes.   Yomogi is highly recommended in all inflammatory conditions, especially asthma, hay fever and atopic dermatitis. In these cases, it should be used internally and put into the bath. It is safe to be used long term and should be used first to get the condition under control and then at any sign of a return of the condition.  A recently rediscovered use of Yomogi is in the prevention and treatment of malaria. Travelers venturing to countries with malaria are now again at risk, as the traditional treatments are no longer working as effectively. Recent research and history reveals Yomogi is an excellent preventative which modern travelers should think about adding to their travel bag before heading to countries troubled with malaria. It can be used to stimulate the body whenever infection is a problem.

Traditional uses:
A. princeps is one of the varieties of mugwort used as moxa in Moxibustion, a traditional medical practice of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Tibet, and Vietnam. An evaluation of the efficacy of the smoke and water extracts of the herb found that both preparations inhibited the growth of a specific line of breast cancer cells in vitro.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+princeps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_princeps
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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Artemisia capillaries

 

Botanical Name : Artemisia capillaries
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species: A. scoparia
Order: Asterales

Common Names : Yin Chen Hao
English Name:Capillary Wormwood Herb
Pin Yin Name:Yin Chen

Other Pin Yin Name:Mian Yin Chen,Bai Hao,Rong Hao,Song Mao Ai,Ma Xian,Po Po Hao,Ye Lan Hao

Habitat :Artemisia capillaries  is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea, Manchuria. It  grows on  the grassy thickets, and along rivers and seashores, C. and S. Japan. Humid slopes, hills, terraces, roadsides and river banks at elevations of 100 – 2700 metres in China.

Description:
Artemisia capillaris is a deciduous perennial herb or subshrub.Stem erect height 0.5 to 1 m,root woody,surface color yellow brown,vertical stripin,branches;seedling covered with brown silk hair,hairless when grow up.Bottom Leaf split wide and short,covered with short silky foliage;middle leaf split long and slim as hair,1mm width;top leaf split into 3 parts or no split,no hair.capitulum small and numerous,flower color yellow,pipe like,outer layer 3 to 5 bud,female,fertible,inner layer bisexual 5 to 7,infertility.Fruit long round shape width 0.8mm,hairless.Flowering during September to October.The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Wind.and the seeds ripen from Sep to October.

Click to see the pictures.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Cultivation:
An easily grown plant, succeeding in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a sunny position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. This species is probably not hardy in all parts of Britain, it tolerates temperatures down to at least -5°c. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation :
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Division in spring or autumn.

Edible Uses :
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Leaves and stems – soaked and boiled

Medicinal Uses:
Antibacterial;  Anticholesterolemic;  Antiviral;  CholagogueDiureticFebrifugeHepatic;  Vasodilator.

Yin Chen Hao has been used in Chinese herbal medicine for over 2,000 years. It is considered to be a bitter and cooling herb, clearing “damp heat” from the liver and gall ducts and relieving fevers. It is an effective remedy for liver problems, being specifically helpful in treating hepatitis with jaundice. Modern research has confirmed that the plant has a tonic and strengthening effect upon the liver, gallbladder and digestive system. The leaves and young shoots are antibacterial, anticholesterolemic, antiviral, cholagogue, diuretic, febrifuge and vasodilator. An infusion is used internally in the treatment of jaundice, hepatitis, gall bladder complaints and feverish illnesses. Externally it has been applied in the form of a plaster for treating headaches. The plant is harvested in late spring and can be dried for later use. Yin Chen Hao is contraindicated for pregnant women

Yin chen hao is an effective remedy for liver problems, being specifically helpful for treating hepatitis with jaundice.  Traditional Chinese medicine holds that it is bitter and cooling, clearing “damp heat” from the liver and gall ducts and relieving fevers.  Yin chen hao is also anti-inflammatory and diuretic.  It was formerly used in a plaster for headaches.  Research indicates that yin chen hao has a tonic and strengthening effect on the liver and gallbladder and digestive system.  It is an effective remedy for liver problems, being specifically helpful in treating hepatitis with jaundice.    An infusion of the young shoots is used internally in the treatment of jaundice, hepatitis, gall bladder complaints and feverish illnesses. Externally it has been applied in the form of a plaster for treating headaches.

Known Hazards : Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.mdidea.com/products/proper/proper05203.html
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+capillaris
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

http://library.thinkquest.org/25983/4.%20Capillaris.htm

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