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Inula cappa

 

Botanical Name : Inula cappa
Family: Asteraceae
Subfamily: Asteroideae
Tribes: Inuleae
Genus: Inula
Species: Inula cappa

Common Name : Sheep’s Ear

Habitat :Inula cappa is native to E. AsiaHimalayas from Himachel Pradesh to south-western China. It grows in shrubberies and on open slopes, often gregarious, at elevations of 1,000 – 2,400 metres. In forests of long-leafed pines.
Description:
Inula cappa is a shrub growing to 1.8 m (6ft). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

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Cultivation: It can be well cultivated in on open slopes, often gregarious, at elevations of 1,000 – 2,400 metres. In forests of long-leafed pines.

Propagation: Through seeds.

Medicinal Uses:
Anodyne, antiphlogistic, carminative, depurative, expectorant, dispels clots. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of peptic ulcers, indigestion and other gastric disorders. A decoction of the root is used in the treatment of fevers. The decoction is also added to bath water in order to relieve body aches caused by hard physical work. A poultice made from the pounded root is applied to the forehead to relieve headaches. The juice of the bark, mixed with equal quantities of the juice from the bark of Ficus semicordata and Myrica esculenta is used in the treatment of menstrual disorders.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Inula_cappa
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Inula+cappa

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Alangium Chinense

Botanical Name : Alangium chinense
Family : Alangiaceae
Genus : Alangium
Synonyms : Alangium begoniifolium – (Roxb.)Baill., Marlea begoniifolia – Roxb.,Stylidium chinense – Lour
Kingdom:
Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Cornales
Species: A. chinense

Habitat :E. Asia – India to C. China .  Upland thickets in W. China. Open places around villages at elevations of 300 – 2400 metres in Nepal.Woodland Garden; Secondary;

Description:-
An evergreen Small deciduous tree, growing to 8m at a slow rate.  Leaves alternate, asymmetrical, ovate, entire or with shallowed pointed lobes, 8-25 cm long, 4.5-16 cm wide, dark green, glabrous or with scatered hairs above, lighter beneath with axillary tufts of hairs along nerves. Apex pointed, base oblique and truncate. Petiole reddish. Flowers in axillary cymes, slightly fragant, about 2 cm long, in July-August. 6-7 white petals, reflexed and sometimes cohered. Conspicuous orange anthers. Fruit ovoid, black

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It is hardy to zone 9. It is in leaf all year, in flower from June to July, and the seeds ripen from August to November. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in any moderately fertile well-drained soil[200]. Requires full sun and a sheltered position[200]. Not very frost tolerant,  this species is likely to be on the borderlines of hardiness even if obtained from its higher provenances . However, although the top growth will be killed back in all but the mildest winters, the plant will usually resprout from the base in the spring and will usually flower in the summer.  These flowers are sweetly scented. This species is closely related to A. platinifolium. Although a fair sized tree in its native habitat, it is unlikely to make more than a shrub more than 2 metres tall in Britain. It does not require pruning.

Propagation:-
Seed – we have no details for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a greenhouse in the spring. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out in early summer and consider giving them some protection from the cold for their first winter outdoors. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in sand in a frame

Medicinal Actions & Uses:-
Blood tonic; Carminative; Contraceptive.

This plant is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs. And, it is used to treat snakebite, used as a carminative. Moreover, it is used to increase circulation, as a contraceptive and a “hemostat”, to treat numbness, rheumatism, and wounds. The roots and the stems are a blood tonic, carminative and contraceptive. They are used in the treatment of rheumatism, numbness, traumatic injuries, wounds and snakebites. A decoction of the leafy shoots is said to be tonic. A paste of the roots is applied to the area around dislocated bones to help them setting. The shoot, rootbark and whole plant are all used medicinally.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Other Uses:-
Oil.

An oil extracted from the seeds is used for lighting lamps.

Scented Plants
Flowers: Fresh
The small white flowers are sweetly scented.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Alangium+chinense
http://www.biologie.uni-ulm.de/systax/dendrologie/Alangchifw.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alangium_chinense
http://www.metafro.be/prelude/prelude_pic/Alangium_chinense4.jpg

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