Tag Archives: Asparagus

Aconitum fischeri

Botanical Name : Aconitum fischeri
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Aconitum
Species: A. fischeri
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales

Common Names: Fischer monkshood,Azure Monkshood

Habitat : Aconitum fischeri is native to E. Asia – Northern Japan, Eastern Russia. (Korea and Siberia and cultivated in gardens in temperate zones for its showy flowers.) It grows in riverside forests on alluvium, often in large groups, clearings, occasionally in birch and alder forests and very rarely on herb covered slopes in Kamtschatka.
Description:
Aconitum fischeri is a perennial plant, growing 61 to 66 cm (24 to 26 in) spreads 61 to 76cm (24 to 30 in). It produces upright spikes of lavender blue flowers in September. This species has particularly strong stems that do not require staking. The deeply divided dark green foliage is very attractive. Plants bloom early-late summer. This plant works well in perennial borders and cottage and woodland gardens and provides colour late in the season. It is pollinated by Bees.Colour of flowers are lavender blue. The plant is deer & rabbit registant.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes. Cultivated in China as a medicinal plant, it has been said to have been rendered much less toxic through this cultivation.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Medicinal Uses:
The dried root is alterative, anaesthetic, antiarthritic, deobstruent, diaphoretic, diuretic, sedative, stimulant. It should be harvested in the autumn as soon as the plant has died down. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Known Hazards: All parts of Aconitum are poisonous. Always wear gloves when working with this plant as simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aconitum_fischeri
http://www.whitehouseperennials.com/catalogue/perennials/item/aconitum-fischeri
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aconitum+fischeri

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Rubus acaulis

Botanical Name : Rubus acaulis
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Subgenus:Cyclactis
Species:R. arcticus
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Names: Dwarf Raspberry,Rubus arcticus, the Arctic bramble or Arctic raspberry

Habitat : Rubus acaulis is native to Northern N. America – Labrador to Alaska, south to Colorado and southern British Columbia. It grows on damp soils.

Description:
Rubus acaulis is a perennial plant growing to 0.1 m (0ft 4in) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in).

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of this country. It is closely related to R. arcticus, and is included in that species by some botanists. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade.
Propagation:
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn
Edible Uses: ..Fruit – raw or cooked. Richly flavoured, it is similar to R. arcticus but with smaller and more numerous drupelets.
Medicinal Uses:
Astringent.
The leaves are astringent and have been used in the treatment of diarrhoea.

Other Uses: Dye…A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+acaulis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_arcticus

Artemisia sieversiana

Botanical Name :Artemisia sieversiana
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus : Artemisia
Species:A. sieversiana

Common names: Sievers wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia sieversiana is native to E. Asia – Himalayas from Pakistan to C. Nepal. It grows on stony ground, especially in Ladakh, and also in dry areas of Nepal, 1500 – 4100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia sieversiana is a annual/perennial plant, growing to 0.8 m (2ft 6in). Leaves are more or less triangular in outline with more acute leaf lobes and a deeply grooved, nearly angled stem. It is in flower from Aug to October, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

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It is well-known for instance in the Czech Republic (Hejný 1964) and Ukrain (Mosyakin 1990).
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation :
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: One report says that the plant is edible but does not say what part of the plant.

Medicinal Uses:

Anthelmintic; Antirheumatic; Antiseptic; Deobstruent; Emmenagogue; Febrifuge; Skin; Tonic.

The leaves and flowering stems are anthelmintic, deobstruent, emmenagogue, febrifuge and tonic. Externally, they are used as an antiseptic and discutient. A decoction of the plant, combined with Ajuga lupulina and Ephedra gerardiana, is used as a wash to relieve painful joints. A paste of the roots is applied to boils.
Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+sieversiana
https://vi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_sieversiana
http://www.nies.go.jp/biodiversity/invasive/DB/detail/80430e.html
http://alienplantsbelgium.be/content/artemisia-sieversiana

Artemisia ludoviciana gnaphalodes

Botanical Name : Artemisia ludoviciana gnaphalodes
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Artemisia
Species:A. ludoviciana
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Name : White Sage

Habitat: Artemisia ludoviciana gnaphalodes is native to N. America – Ontario and Illinois to Alberta, Missouri, Texas and Mexico.It grows on prairies, plains and dry open soils.

Description:
Artemisia ludoviciana gnaphalodes is a perennial plant. It grows about 2-3′ tall when it is mature, branching occasionally in the upper half. The stems are covered in a dense mat of short white hairs. The alternate leaves are up to 3½” long and 1″ across. They are usually oblanceolate, narrowly ovate, or linear. The lower leaves may have a few lobes or coarse teeth towards their tips, while the upper leaves have smooth margins. Like the stems, the leaves have a dense mat of short white hairs, especially on the lower surface. This variety of White Sage has dense white hairs on the upper surface of the leaves as well, except for the oldest leaves toward the bottom of the plant. The leaves are sessile against the stem, or have short petioles. Some of the upper stems terminate in elongated spikes or narrow racemes of compound flowers. Each flowerhead is only 1/8″ (3 mm.) across, and contains numerous whitish green disk florets that are inconspicuous. The blooming period is late summer to early fall, and lasts about 2-3 weeks. There is no floral scent, although the foliage of this plant is quite aromatic. Pollination is by wind, rather than insects. The tiny seeds are without tufts of hair, but are small enough to be distributed by the wind. The root system is rhizomatous, and can form a dense mat of roots near the surface of the ground. As a result, this plant has a strong tendency to form clonal colonies that exclude other plants….CLICK & SEE THEPIC TURES
Cultivation:
Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Slugs are attracted to the young shoots in spring and have been known to destroy even well-established plants. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.

Medicinal Uses:
An infusion of the plant is used to treat stomach problems, coughs, colds, headaches etc. A decoction of the leaves is used as a bath to treat fevers and can be applied as a wash to sores, rashes, itches, skin eruptions etc. An infusion of the leaves has been used as an eyewash. The powdered leaves can be applied to the nostrils to stop nose bleeds, sprinkled on sores they will hasten the healing process. The crushed plant can be rubbed on the body as a liniment to treat rheumatic joints, soreness or stiffness. The plant can be placed in the shoes to keep the feet from sweating.
Other Uses: Bunches of the plants have been used as towels. The plant can be burnt as an incense.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer :The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_ludoviciana
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+ludoviciana+gnaphalodes
http://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/prairie/plantx/white_sagex.htm

Allium brevistylum

Botanical Name : Allium brevistylum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species: A. brevistylum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Name : Shortstyle Onion

Habitat :Allium brevistylum is native to the western United StatesRocky Mountains from Montana and Idaho to Utah and Colorado.
It grows on the swampy meadows and stream sides at medium to high elevations.
Description:
General: perennial herb with an onion- or garlic-like odor,
flowering stem 20-60 cm tall, flattened and narrowly winged
toward the top. Bulbs elongate, mostly less than 1 cm
thick, at the end of a thick rhizome.

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Leaves: 2 to several basal, plane, blunt-tipped, entire,
2-8 mm broad, much shorter than the stem, green at
flowering time, persistent at maturity.

Flowers: 7 to 15 in a flat-topped umbel-cluster, stalks
slender, about as long as the flowers at flowering time,
becoming longer, stout and curved in fruit. Tepals 6, 10-13
mm long, lanceolate, pointed, entire, pink, withering in fruit,
the midribs somewhat thickened. Bracts 2, united at base
and often along one side, ovate, pointed, 3- to 5-nerved.
Stamens about half the length of the tepals, the anthers
short-oblong, blunt, yellowish. Ovary crestless, the style
awl-shaped, rarely more than 3 mm long, stigma 3-cleft.
Flowering time: June-August.

Fruits: capsules broader than long, the valves heart-
shaped, distinctly notched. Seeds correspondingly short
and thick, dull black.

Bulb of Allium brevistylum is  growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in).
Cultivation:
Prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. This species tolerates much wetter soils than most members of the genus but it dislikes winters with alternating periods of damp and cold and no snow cover, so it is best given a damp though well-drained soil. It requires plenty of moisture in the growing season.  The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Plants can be confused with A. validum. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. The plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season, pot up the divisions in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are growing well and then plant them out into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses:
The Bulb and leaves of short-styled onion are edible, raw or cooked. The plant has thick iris-like rhizomes. Indians used wild onions extensively. Their bulbs served as a staple and condiment to many different tribes. The crisp bulbs were gathered by Indians from Spring through early Fall. They were eaten raw and used as an ingredient in soups, stews and meat dishes. The bulbs also stored well for winter use The flowers can also be eaten raw, and used as a garnish on salads.

Medicinal Uses:
A few Indian tribes would crush the wild onion and apply it to bee and insect bites to reduce swelling and pain. Others used it to draw poison out of snakebites. A heavy syrup made from the juice of the wild onion was also used for coughs and other cold symptoms. A poultice of the ground root and stems, or an infusion of them, was used as a wash for carbuncles by the Cheyenne Indians. Onions in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavor) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: The juice of the plant has been used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.

Known Hazards: Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_brevistylum
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242101338
http://montana.plant-life.org/species/allium_brevi.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+brevistylum