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Corallorhiza maculata

Botanical Name : Corallorhiza maculata
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Epidendroideae
Tribe: Maxillarieae
Subtribe: Corallorhizinae
Genus: Corallorhiza
Species: C. maculata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Name : Summer Coralroot, Spotted coralroot, Varieties are also known as western coralroot and summer coralroot

Habitat :Corallorhiza maculata is native to N. America – Nova Scotia to British Columbia, south to Florida, New Mexico and California ?ows on leaf mold in woods. Moist to dry coniferous and deciduous woods, and conifer plantations, often in florests with little other herbaceous cover at elevations of 0 – 3700 metres.

Description:
Corallorhiza maculata is a perennial orchid plant, growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). It is in flower from Jun to August. The flowers are small and emerge regularly from all sides of the stem. The sepals are dark red or brown tinged with purple, long and pointed. The side petals are reddish, and the lip petal is bright clean white with deep red spots. It is usually lobed or toothed on the side and 7–10 mm. In some varieties, the lip is plain white without spots.

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Corallorhiza maculata is a myco-heterotroph; it lacks chlorophyll and gets food by parasitizing the mycelium of fungi in the family Russulaceae. The rhizome and lower stem are often knotted into branched coral shapes. The stem is usually red or brown in color, but occasionally comes in a light yellow or cream color. There are no leaves and no photosynthetic green tissues. The stems bear dark red scales and intricate orchid flowers. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Flies.
Medicinal Uses:
An infusion of the plant has been used as a lotion in the treatment of ringworm and skin diseases. An infusion of the dried, whole plant bits has been used in the treatment of colds. A decoction of the stalks has been used to ‘build up the blood’ of people suffering from pneumonia.Several Native American groups historically used the orchid’s stems dried and brewed as a tea for such maladies as colds, pneumonia, and skin irritation. Corallorhiza macluata is also the topic of the poem On Going Unnoticed by Robert Frost.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corallorhiza_maculata
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Corallorhiza+maculata

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Viola canadensis

Botanical Name : Viola canadensis
Family:  Violaceae – Violet family
Genus : Viola L. – violet
Species :Viola canadensis L. – Canadian white violet
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision:  Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division : Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class : Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Dilleniidae
Order : Violales

Synonyms:Viola canadensis Linnaeus var. rugulosa (Greene) C.L. Hitchcock ,Viola canadensis Linnaeus var. canadensis sensu NM authors,Viola canadensis Linnaeus var. neomexicana (Greene) House,Viola rydbergii Greene

Common Name : Canada Violet,Canadian white violet, Canada Violet, tall white violet, or white violet.

Habitat : It is native to Canada and the eastern United States.Viola canadensis is our most common white violet in the Gila National Forest. It is found along moist streambanks under trees, occasionally in large numbers.It is threatened or endangered in some areas, and abundant in others. There are four varieties.

Description:
General: perennial with short, thick rootstocks and often
with slender stolons. Stems 10-40 cm tall, hairless to
short-hairy.

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Leaves: basal and alternate, the stalks as much as 30
cm long. Leaf blades heart-shaped, abruptly pointed, about
4-8 cm long, from (usually) short-hairy on one or both
surfaces to hairless. Stipules lanceolate, 1-2 cm long,
entire, hairless to hairy on the edges only. The apex of the leaf is acute.

Flowers: one to few from the upper portion of the stem,
the stalks shorter than the leaves. The 5 sepals lanceolate,
often short-hairy and with hairy edges, the spur short. The
5 petals about 1.5 cm long, white to pinkish, yellow-based,
the 3 lower ones purplish-lined, the side bearded, all (but
especially the upper pair) more or less purplish-tinged on
the outside and sometimes less conspicuously so on the
inside. Style head sparsely long-bearded.The throat of the flower is marked with yellow with faint purple guidelines.

Flowering time: May-July.

Fruits: capsules, 4-5 mm long, granular on the surface
to short-hairy, with 3 valves, splitting open explosively and
shooting out seeds, the seeds brownish.

Medicinal Uses:
A tea made from the roots has been used in the treatment of pain in the bladder region.  The roots and leaves have traditionally been used to induce vomiting, they have also been poulticed and applied to skin abrasions and boils.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://montana.plant-life.org/species/viola_canad.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.wnmu.edu/academic/nspages/gilaflora/viola_canadensis.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_canadensis

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Chocolate May Help Prevent Stroke

Those who give chocolate as a gift this Valentine’s Day may be surprised to learn that the sweet treat has taken on a whole new dimension, according to the latest research from McMaster University. The recently released study indicates that chocolate may help lower an individual’s risk of stroke.
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The team of scientists took into account three different studies before reaching this conclusion. One study tracked 44,489 participants and found that those who consumed a serving of chocolate each week decreased their risk of stroke by 22 percent.

While study author Sarah Sahib admitted “more research is needed to determine whether chocolate truly lowers stroke risk,” a second study of 1,169 individuals revealed that consuming 50 grams or more of chocolate each week may decrease stroke risk by 46 percent.

It is believed that some of the antioxidants in chocolate may have health benefits, but this doesn’t mean individuals should abandon a balanced diet and adequate exercise each day.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, stroke is the third most frequent cause of death in America today and about 137,000 Americans die from a stroke each year.

Source:Better Health Research.12th Feb.2010

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It’s Not That We Have a Short Time to Live, But That We Waste a Lot of It

On The Shortness of Life” is one of Lucius Seneca’s most famous letters. It’s valuable to read it whenever you feel the urge to succumb to social pressure and treat time as less valuable than income. Time is non-renewable, and “On The Shortness of Life” helps put this in a practical context, as relevant now as it was nearly 2,000 years ago.

 

Seneca says, “It is not that we have a short space of time, but that we waste much of it. Life is long enough, and it has been given in sufficiently generous measure to allow the accomplishment of the very greatest things if the whole of it is well invested.”

The full letter is contained in the link below. For a quick 4-minute overview, you can read the bolded passages. But it’s worthwhile to read the entire piece on a slow evening. Each person identifies with different passages.

The letter is posted by Tim Ferriss, author of the bestselling book, The 4-Hour Workweek. If you’re looking for more tips on how to make the most of your life, I highly recommend picking up a copy. This book has had a MAJOR impact on my own life, and I suspect it will have a positive influence on yours as well.

Sources: Four Hour Work Week April 26, 2009

You may click to see also:->
*Do What You Love: Time is Too Short to do Anything Else
*Stealing Time for Yourself: Six Ways to Find the Time You Need to Change Your Life
A Different Take on Death From Carl Jung

The Ego

In most spiritual circles, the ego gets a pretty bad rap. The reason for this is that the ego, to some extent, is the principle in our psyches that separates us from one another, while spirit is the principle that shows us that no such separation exists.

Sometimes the ego is depicted as an almost demonic figure that keeps us from realizing our true nature. But at its most basic, the ego is simply a tool that helps us organize the various aspects of our personality so that we can function in the world. In this sense, the ego is simply a way for us to understand and attend to ourselves at the same time as we understand and attend to the world around us. The ego is a tool that we use to navigate the world.

Perhaps the problem is that the ego sometimes gets out of control. This happens when the higher self loses control of the psyche. The psyche then falls under the leadership of the ego, an entity that was never meant to lead. The ego is meant to be definitively in the service of the higher self. When this relationship is functioning, the ego is a useful intermediary representing the whole self but not thinking that it is the whole self. Then, it is almost as if the ego is the self playfully pretending to be the separate entity called “I.” Like an actor, the ego plays the roles that the world asks us to play in order to be part of the program. In this way, the ego can be a tool enabling us to be in the world but not of it.

As long as we are in touch with our higher selves, our egos are not a threat. They are simply useful tools in the service of spirit. We keep our egos in check when we continually nurture our awareness of who we really are. Then our egos are free to serve without trying ineffectually to rule. It is healthy to have ego, but like all other things in life, ego functions best when it is in balance and harmony with your whole self.

Souirce:Daily Om