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Aconitum kusnezoffii

Botanical Name : Aconitum kusnezoffii
Family: Ranunculaceae
Subfamily: Ranunculoideae
Tribe: Aconiteae
Genus: Aconitum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ranunculales
Species: Aconitum kusnezoffii

Common Name: Bei Wu Tou

Habitat: Aconitum kusnezoffii is native to E. Asia – N. China, N. Japan in Kamtschatka, Korea and Siberia. It grows on grassy slopes, grasslands, forests, forest margins, by streams at elevations of 2200 – 2400 metres.

Description:

Aconitum kusnezoffii is a perennial plant growing to 1.5 m (5ft). usually branched, glabrous, with leaves equally arranged along stem.Root stocks are conical or carrot-shaped, 2.5–5 cm, 7–12 mm in diam. Proximal cauline leaves withered at anthesis, middle ones shortly to long petiolate; petiole 3–11 cm, glabrous; leaf blade pentagonal, 9–16 × 10–20 cm, papery or subleathery, abaxially glabrous, adaxially sparsely retrorse pubescent, base cordate, 3-sect; central segment rhombic, apex acuminate, subpinnately divided or lobed; lateral segments obliquely flabellate, unequally 2-parted. Inflorescence terminal, 9–22-flowered; rachis and pedicels glabrous; proximal bracts 3-fid, others oblong or linear. Proximal pedicels 1.8–3.5(–5) cm, with 2 bracteoles at middle or below; bracteoles linear or subulate-linear, 3.5–5 × ca. 1 mm. Sepals purple-blue, abaxially sparsely retrorse pubescent or nearly glabrous; lower sepals oblong, 1.2–1.4 cm; lateral sepals 1.4–1.6(–1.7) cm; upper sepal galeate or high galeate, 1.5–2.5 cm high, shortly or long beaked, lower margin ca. 1.8 cm. Petals glabrous; limb 3–4 mm wide; lip 3–5 mm; spur incurved or subcircinate, 1–4 mm. Stamens glabrous; filaments entire or 2-denticulate. Carpels (4 or)5, glabrous. Follicles erect, (0.8–)1.2–2 cm. Seeds ca. 2.5 mm.

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It is in flower from Jul to September. and are pollinated by Bees.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil
Cultivation:
Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. This species is closely related to A. yezoense. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.
Medicinal Uses:
The root is alterative, anaesthetic, antiarthritic, deobstruent, diaphoretic, diuretic, sedative and stimulant. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Known Hazards : The whole plant is highly toxic – simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Aconitum_kusnezoffii
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200007241
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aconitum+kusnezoffii

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Aconitum gammiei

Botanical Name; Aconitum gammiei
Family:
Ranunculaceae
Genus:Aconitum
Species:
Aconitum gammiei
Domain:
Eukaryotic
Kingdom
:Plantae
Division
:Tracheophyta
Class:
Magnoliopsida
Order:
Ranunculales

Synonyms:
*Aconitum wallichianum Lauener
*Aconitum huizenense TL Ming
*Aconitum Dissectum D. Don

Habitat : Aconitum gammiei is native to E. Asia – Himalayas. It grows on the alpine shrubberies and open slopes, 3300 – 4800 metres from C. Nepal to S.E. Tibet.

Description:
Aconitum gammiei is a perennial herb. Stem 75–100 cm tall, branched, basally retrorse pubescent, apically glabrous. Middle cauline leaves long petiolate; petiole to 6 cm; leaf blade subpentagonal, to 9 × 10 cm, both surfaces subglabrous, base cordate, 3-sect; central segment rhombic, pinnately parted to midvein, ultimate lobes narrowly triangular to linear; lateral ones obliquely flabellate, 3-sect. Inflorescence terminal, 6–9 cm, 3–5-flowered; rachis and pedicels glabrous; bracts leaflike. Pedicels 1.5–7.5 cm, with 2 bracteoles proximally or distally; bracteoles leaflike or lanceolate. Sepals blue-purple, glabrous abaxially; lower sepals elliptic; lateral sepals obliquely orbicular-obovate, 1.2–2 cm; upper sepal navicular-galeate, 1.8–2 cm high, 1.2–1.8 cm from base to beak, lower margin concave. Petals ca. 2.4 cm; limb ca. 1 cm, sparsely pubescent; lip ca. 5.5 mm. Stamens sparsely pubescent; filaments entire or 2-denticulate. Carpels 5, glabrous. The plant is polinated by bees and it blooms in September.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by the native range of the plant it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Thrives in most soils and in the light shade of trees. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil in sun or semi-shade. Prefers a calcareous soil. Grows well in open woodlands. Members of this genus seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits and deer. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby species, especially legumes.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. The seed can be stratified and sown in spring but will then be slow to germinate. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer. Division – best done in spring but it can also be done in autumn. Another report says that division is best carried out in the autumn or late winter because the plants come into growth very early in the year.

Medicinal Uses:
The root is stomachic. The juice of the roots is used in the treatment of stomach aches. This is a very poisonous plant and should only be used with extreme caution and under the supervision of a qualified practitioner.

Known Hazards: The whole plant is highly toxic – simple skin contact has caused numbness in some people.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=https%3A%2F%2Fsv.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAconitum_gammiei&edit-text=
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=242000026
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Aconitum+gammiei

Ceanothus ovatus

Botanical Name : Ceanothus ovatus
Family: Rhamnaceae
Genus: Ceanothus
Specie:s:   C. americanus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Synonyms : C. herbaceus. Raf.

Common Name : Smaller Red-Root

Habitat: Ceanothus ovatus is native to Eastern and Central N. America – western Maine and Quebec to Manitoba, south to Texas. It grows on sandy or rocky plains, prairies and slopes.

Description:
Ceanothus ovatus is a deciduous Shrub growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) with smooth narrow oval leaves & short-stalked, rounded clusters of white flowers in June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It can fix Nitrogen. The seeds are eaten by Bob-White (quail) and many other birds……… CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Cultivation: 

Prefers a warm sunny position but tolerates light shade. Tolerates some lime, but will not succeed on shallow chalk. Plants dislike root disturbance, they should be planted out into their permanent positions whilst still small. Dislikes heavy pruning, it is best not to cut out any wood thicker than a pencil. Any pruning is best carried out in the spring. Fast growing, it flowers well when young, often in its second year from seed. Closely related to C. americanus. It hybridizes freely with other members of this genus. Some members of this genus have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil micro-organisms, these form nodules on the roots of the plants and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby.
Propagation:
Seed – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed should be pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then given 1 – 3 months stratification at 1°c. Germination usually takes place within 1 – 2 months at 20°c. One report says that the seed is best given boiling water treatment, or heated in 4 times its volume of sand at 90 – 120°c for 4 – 5 minutes and then soaked in warm water for 12 hours before sowing it. The seed exhibits considerable longevity, when stored for 15 years in an air-tight dry container at 1 – 5°c it has shown little deterioration in viability. The seed is ejected from its capsule with some force when fully ripe, timing the collection of seed can be difficult because unless collected just prior to dehiscence the seed is difficult to extract and rarely germinates satisfactorily. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, taken at a node, July/August in a frame. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year’s growth, 7 – 12 cm with a heel, October in a cold frame. The roots are quite brittle and it is best to pot up the callused cuttings in spring, just before the roots break. Good percentage

Edible Uses:… Tea…..The young leaves and flowers are steeped in boiling water for about 5 minutes. The resulting liquid is yellowish in colour and tastes similar to Oriental tea but is considered milder and sweeter.

Medicinal Uses:....A decoction of the roots has been used as a cough remedy.

Other Uses:
Dye; Miscellany; Soap.
A green dye is obtained from the flowers. All parts of the plant are rich in saponins – when crushed and mixed with water they produce a good lather which is an effective and gentle soap. This soap is very good at removing dirt, though it does not remove oils very well. This means that when used on the skin it will not remove the natural body oils, but nor will it remove engine oil etc The flowers are a very good source, when used as a body soap they leave behind a pleasant perfume on the skin. The developing seed cases are also a very good source of saponins.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceanothus_americanus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ceanothus+ovatus
https://www.forestfarm.com/product.php?id=5186

Cenothera biennis

Botanical Name : Cenothera biennis
Family: Onagraceae
Genus: Oenothera
Species: O. biennis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Myrtales

Synonym: Tree Primrose.

Common Names: Evening primrose, Common evening-primrose, Evening star, or Sun drop

English Names: It is also known as Weedy evening-primrose, German rampion, Hog weed, King’s cure-all, and Fever-plant

Parts Used: Bark, leaves.

Habitat: The Evening or Tree Primrose, though originally a native of North Arnerica, was imported first into Italy and has been carried all over Europe, being often naturalized on river-banks and other sandy places in Western Europe. It is often cultivated in English gardens, and is apparently fully naturalized in Lancashire and some other counties of England, having been first a garden escape. It is found grows in dunes, roadsides, railway banks and waste places in Britain, often in sandy soils.

Description:
Oenothera biennis has a life span of two years (biennial plant) growing to 30–150 cm (12–59 in) tall. The leaves are lanceolate, 5–20 cm (2.0–7.9 in) long and 1–2.5 cm (0.39–0.98 in) broad, produced in a tight rosette the first year, and spirally on a stem the second year.

Blooming lasts from late spring to late summer. The flowers are hermaphrodite, produced on a tall spike and only last until the following noon. They open visibly fast every evening producing an interesting spectacle, hence the name “evening primrose.”

The blooms are yellow, 2.5–5 cm (0.98–1.97 in) diameter, with four bilobed petals. The flower structure has an invisible to the naked eye bright nectar guide pattern. This pattern is apparent under ultraviolet light and visible to its pollinators, moths, butterflies, and bees.

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The fruit is a capsule 2–4 cm (0.79–1.57 in) long and 4–6 mm (0.16–0.24 in) broad, containing numerous 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) long seeds, released when the capsule splits into four sections at maturity.

Cultivation: Prefers a dryish well-drained sandy loam and a warm sunny position, though it is tolerant of most soils[4]. Heavy clay soils may induce winter rots. Grows well on very poor soils. Established plants are drought resistant. Formerly cultivated for its edible roots, the evening primrose is being increasingly cultivated for the oil contained in its seed which contains certain essential fatty acids and is a very valuable addition to the diet. See the notes on medicinal uses for more details. The flowers open in the evening and are strongly scented with a delicious sweet perfume, attracting pollinating moths. The seeds are a good food source for birds. Plants usually self-sow freely if they are growing in a suitable position, they can naturalize in the wild garden.

Propagation: Seed – sow in situ from late spring to early summer
Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Oil; Root; Seedpod.
Edible Uses: Oil.

Root – cooked. Boiled and eaten like salsify. Fleshy, sweet and succulent. Wholesome and nutritious. A peppery taste. The taste somewhat resembles salsify or parsnips. Young shoots – raw or cooked. Mucilaginous, with a peppery flavour, they are best used sparingly. Another source suggests that the shoots should not be eaten. Flowers – sweet. Used in salads or as a garnish. Young seedpods – cooked. Steamed. The seed contains 28% of a drying oil. It is edible and a very good source of gamma-linolenic acid, an essential fatty acid that is not found in many plant sources and has numerous vital functions in the body. The seed, however, is very small and difficult to harvest, it has to be done by hand. Overall yields are low, making the oil very expensive to produce.

Parts Used in medicines: Bark and leaves. The bark is peeled from the flower-stems and dried in the same manner as the leaves, which are collected in the second year, when the flowerstalk has made its appearance.

Medicinal Uses:
Anticholesterolemic; Antipruritic; Astringent; Hypotensive; Miscellany; Sedative.

The bark and the leaves are astringent and sedative. They have proved of use in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disorders of a functional origin, whooping cough and asthma. A syrup made from the flowers is also an effective treatment for whooping cough. The bark is stripped from the flowering stem and dried for later use, the leaves are also harvested and dried at this time. Evening primrose oil has become a well-known food supplement since the 1980’s. Research suggests that the oil is potentially very valuable in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, pre-menstrual tension, hyperactivity etc. It is also taken internally in the treatment of eczema, acne, brittle nails, rheumatoid arthritis and alcohol-related liver damage. Regular consumption of the oil helps to reduce blood cholesterol levels and lower the blood pressure. The seed is a good source of gamma-linolenic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid which assists the production of hormone-like substances. This process is commonly blocked in the body, causing disorders that affect the uterine muscles, nervous system and metabolism. The poulticed root is applied to piles and bruises. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of obesity and bowel pains.

Other Uses:
Cosmetic; Dye; Miscellany; Oil.

The oil from the seed is added to skin preparations and cosmetics. It is often combined with vitamin E to prevent oxidation. A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers. A finely ground powder made from the flowering stems is used cosmetically in face-masks to counteract reddened skins.

Known Hazards: Lowers the threshold for epileptic fits (avoid). Caution if on anticoagulants. Combining with phenothiazines (allopathic medication) can trigger seizures. Adverse effects: may cause headaches and nausea on an empty stomach. Diarrhoea with high doses. Seizures in schizophrenic patients on phenothiazines (allergy antihistamines)

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oenothera_biennis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Oenothera+biennis
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/p/primro70.html

Senecio erucifolius

Botanical Name : Senecio erucifolius
Family:Asteraceae or Compositae
Tribe: Senecioneae
Genus: Jacobaea
Species: J. erucifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Syn: Jacobaea erucifolia

Common Names: Hoary Groundsel, Hoary ragwort

Habitat: Senecio erucifolius occurs in Central and southern Europe, including Britain, north to Denmark and Lithuania, east to W. Asia. It grows in dry banks, field borders, grassy slopes and roadsides, in limestone and chalky districts and especially on heavy soils.

Description:
Senecio erucifolius is a perennial herb, growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in).Medium to tall, grey downy plant, with a shortly creeping stock bearing terminal leaf rosettes. Stems erect, branched above the middle. Leaves pinnately lobed, the lower stalked and usually present at flowering time. Upper leaves with narrower lobes; all leaves with somewhat down rolled margins and woolly, especially beneath. Flowerheads bright yellow 12 to 15 mm with 12 to 15 rays, borne in a narrow flat topped cluster.It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on the cultivation needs of this plant but, judging by its native habitats, it is likely to require a sunny position and to succeed in most moderate to heavy soils, including those of an alkaline nature.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in situ. Division in spring
Medicinal Uses:
Anthelmintic; Antiscorbutic; Diaphoretic; Diuretic; Emmenagogue; Poultice; Purgative.

The plant is used in plasters, ointments and poultices. This species is related to groundsel, S. vulgaris, and is said to have similar properties. These are:- The whole herb is anthelmintic, antiscorbutic, diaphoretic, diuretic, emmenagogue and purgative. It is often used as a poultice and is said to be useful in treating sickness of the stomach, whilst a weak infusion is used as a simple and easy purgative. The plant can be harvested in May and dried for later use, or the fresh juice can be extracted and used as required. Use with caution, see notes above on toxicity.

Known Hazards: All parts of the plant are poisonous to many mammals, including humans. The toxin affects the liver and has a cumulative affect. Some mammals, such as rabbits, do not seem to be harmed by the plant, and will often seek it out. Various birds also eat the leaves and seeds.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacobaea_erucifolia
http://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/hoary-ragwort
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Senecio+erucifolius