Tag Archives: Baked beans

Liquid Lunch Helps to Reduce Weight

It gives a whole new, and rather more healthy meaning to the liquid lunch.
…………………..Spring_Vegetable_Soup
Eating food with a high water content could be the key to losing weight.

Nutritionists believe that dishes such as rice, pasta, soups and stews, appear to keep you feeling fuller for longer. But the liquid must be part of the food.

Drinking a glass of water while you eat will not have the same effect, said the British Nutrition Foundation.

The theory is based on studies which showed that although somebody will eat different foods on different days, the weight of food consumed will hardly vary.

This means that if we eat foods that are just as bulky but contain fewer calories, we should feel just as full.

Water-rich foods tend to be low in calories or have a low energy density, a BNF conference heard.

A spokesman said: ‘Studies have shown that people tend to consume the same weight of food each day but not necessarily the same amount of energy or calories.

‘So it is possible to trick ourselves into consuming less energy, without feeling hungrier, by eating a lower energy density diet which still makes up the same weight of foods overall throughout the day.’

To work out the energy density of a food, divide the number of calories by its weight.

So a 40g bag of crisps with 200 calories has an energy density of five – putting it towards the high end of the scale.

At the other end of the scale are most fruits and vegetables, as well as vegetable soups, low-fat yoghurt, baked beans, baked potatoes and cornflakes.

Many of these are high in water and all have an energy density of 1.5 or less, making them good to fill up on.

Foods with a medium rating include strawberries and cream, lasagne, steak, pizza and chips.

Joining crisps at the high end of the scale, with ratings of four or more, are cheese, chocolate, mayonnaise and butter.

Chocolate-lovers, however, can take some heart. The lightness of chocolate mousse means it has a lower rating – and so is more filling – than squares of chocolate.

Source:Mail Online  :July 01.’09

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Ways To Reduce Salt Consumption

A few ways you can cut down on the salt on your food.

Measure salt carefully when preparing a dish
Use fresh ingredients over processed whenever you can
You will save umpteen milligrams of sodium by making your own sauces and soups, and simmering dried beans until soft (rather than opening a can).

Yes, it is a time commitment, but if you  are serious about salt reduction it’s time well spent. Make these staples more convenient by cooking them in big batches, and freezing in single-serving portions for later use.

Choose convenience foods wisely
Opt for frozen (unsauced) vegetables when you can’t get them fresh. Rinse the foods in a colander before using to get rid of some of the salt. Cut back or eliminate additional salt in a recipe that calls for canned goods.

Don’t add it if you can not taste it
As a rule, we don’t add salt to boiling water for pasta or potatoes in our kitchens. We prefer to add salt to a dish when its impact will be strongest   usually at the end of cooking. A little salt goes a longer way if it’s sprinkled on a food just before serving; you  wll taste it in every bite.

Measure, measure
We always use measuring spoons when adding salt to be sure we are not overdoing it. Even if a recipe calls for a “pinch” or to “salt to taste,” measure what you are adding, using a small amount (say, 1/8th teaspoon) at a time and tasting as you go.

Distract your palate
Acidic flavourings like lemon or lime juice and vinegar can help bring out a food  is inherent savouriness, helping you reduce or even eliminate salt.

Or, try a sprinkle of fresh grated lemon zest, chopped fresh or dried herbs, garlic or shallots; while not always a perfect replacement for salt, they can help ease the transition to lower-salt cooking by waking up other flavours. Get creative with seasoning, found in any spice aisle; just make sure they  are labelled   salt-free.

Boost vegetable flavours naturally
Because many vegetables have flavours our palates perceive as bitter, they tend to be a target for lots of added salt in recipes. Instead of reaching for the salt shaker to counteract bitterness, roast or grill your vegetables to help bring out their own natural sweetness and give them a nice caramelised exterior.

Source:The Times Of India

Don’t let your diet ruin the big occasion

What you eat and drink plays a critical role in helping you to look and feel your best when you walk down the red carpet.

Although most of us will only ever experience LA’s Kodak Theatre from the comfort of our sitting rooms, we can all relate to the desire to slip effortlessly into our favourite dress to create a special entrance. If the event is just days away, you don’t have time to lose any significant amount of weight, but you can help yourself to feel and appear slimmer by overcoming the dreaded bloat. Scientific studies establishing the best “antibloat” plans are virtually nonexistent, but we are lucky enough to have a few enlightened doctors and medical herbalists to give us some assistance.

Go salt free. As Graham MacGregor, a Professor of Medicine at St Georges Hospital, southwest London, explains:   When we eat excess salt, our bodies hold on to extra water to dilute its presence. Such retention of salt causes us to hang on to as much as 1.5 litres (two and a half pints) of fluid, causing weight gains of around 1kg (2-3lb). Switching to a low salt intake can cause losses of this fluid.  Bloating and swollen ankles can  deflate   within days.  Exactly the same principles apply to the menstrual cycle, where many women swell up. A reduced salt intake can often relieve symptoms dramatically,  he says.

The best way to do this is to cut out all processed foods
, since 75 per cent of our salt comes from these. Stick with sugar-free muesli or eggs for breakfast and lean meat and fish with lots of salads and vegetables at other meals, with fruit for snacks.

Eat slowly. Dr John Hunter, a consultant physician at Ad-denbrooke’s Hospital, Cambridge, and an authority on food in relation to the gut, advises:  Treat your gut with respect. Eating very quickly and drinking fluids at the same time makes it more likely that you will swallow a lot of air, leading to bloating. Avoid chewing gum, too, since it to can cause you to swallow extra air.

Destress.
It is worth taking it easy and trying to relax before a big night out.  It is not uncommon for people to hyperventilate without being aware that they are doing so,  Dr Hunter says.  During the day large volumes of air can be swallowed in this way, resulting in bloating.  Chamomile tea is certainly worth trying, to help you to calm down. As medical herbalists such as Dr Ann Walker, of Reading University, tell us, its active volatile oils contain the compound apigenin, which acts on the same parts of the brain and nervous system as those affected by antianxiety drugs and can calm both our minds and our digestive tracts.

Swap to soya milk. Lactose is the sugar in milk and if not digested properly by the enzyme lactase in the small intestine, it passes into the colon to be fermented by bacteria that produce gases and cause bloating. Lactose intolerance can be absolute and for life, yet some of us can experience transient symptoms. Swapping to soya milk for a few days may just help to relieve a bout of bloating. Avoid vegetables with gassy notoriety.Burbulence, the various windy symptoms that arise from gas in the gut, is said to be encouraged by peas, broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cabbage. Avoiding these is probably a good idea on your   Oscar  day.

Beans, too, can notoriously cause bloating, as Dr W. Grant Thompson, professor emeritus at the University of Ottawa, explains in his book Gut Reactions:   Beans contain a   wind factor’ consisting of the complex saccharides stachyose and raffinose. These cannot be absorbed by the intestine because the enzymes necessary for their digestion do not exist in humans. Certain colon bacteria are capable of metabolising these substances, thereby releasing hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide.

Avoid fizzy drinks.
Both Dr Hunter and Dr Thompson also suggest the elimination of carbonated drinks to avoid abdominal distension. This is well worth doing both the day before your big event and on the evening itself to help to maintain your smooth and elegant lines, although personally I do not think a glass of champagne will hurt.

From:Times on line

Diverticular Disorders

Description:
Diverticular disease is a condition that occurs when a person has problems from small pouches, or sacs, that have formed and pushed outward through weak spots in the colon wall. Each pouch is called a diverticulum. Multiple pouches are called diverticula.

The colon is part of the large intestine. The large intestine absorbs water from stool and changes it from a liquid to a solid form. Diverticula are most common in the lower part of the colon, called the sigmoid colon.

The problems that occur with diverticular disease include diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding. Diverticulitis occurs when the diverticula become inflamed, or irritated and swollen, and infected. Diverticular bleeding occurs when a small blood vessel within the wall of a diverticulum bursts.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
When a person has diverticula that do not cause diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding, the condition is called diverticulosis. Most people with diverticulosis do not have symptoms. Some people with diverticulosis have constipation or diarrhea. People may also have chronic

cramping or pain in the lower abdomen—the area between the chest and hips
bloating.

One in ten Americans over age 40 and half of those over age 60 have a diverticular disorder. But this isn’t a disease of aging per se; it’s a disease of lifestyle, particularly lack of fiber and exercise. A few simple measures can help.

Diverticular disease is a condition that occurs when a person has problems from small pouches, or sacs, that have formed and pushed outward through weak spots in the colon wall.

Other conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome and stomach ulcers, cause similar problems, so these symptoms do not always mean a person has diverticulosis. People with these symptoms should see their health care provider.

Diverticulosis becomes more common as people age, particularly in people older than age 50.3 Some people with diverticulosis develop diverticulitis, and the number of cases is increasing. Although diverticular disease is generally thought to be a condition found in older adults, it is becoming more common in people younger than age 50, most of whom are male.

 

Symptoms

Often there are no symptoms.
In some cases, bloating, gas, nausea, and constipation alternate with diarrhea.

People with diverticulitis may have many symptoms, the most common of which is pain in the lower left side of the abdomen. The pain is usually severe and comes on suddenly, though it can also be mild and then worsen over several days. The intensity of the pain can fluctuate. Diverticulitis may also cause

*fevers and chills
*nausea or vomiting
*a change in bowel habits—constipation or diarrhea
*diverticular bleeding

In most cases, people with diverticular bleeding suddenly have a large amount of red or maroon-colored blood in their stool. Diverticular bleeding may also cause

*weakness
*dizziness or light-headedness
*abdominal cramping

 

When to Call Your Doctor

If you have fever, chills, and abdominal swelling or are vomiting — these may be signs of a ruptured diverticulum.
If you have blood or mucus in the stool or any other symptoms of diverticulitis.
If diverticular pain does not subside despite self-care.
Reminder: If you have a medical condition, talk to your doctor before taking supplements.

What It Is

There are two main types of diverticular disorders: diverticulosis and the more serious diverticulitis. In diverticulosis, the inner lining of the large bowel pushes through the muscular layer that usually confines it, forming pouches (diverticula) ranging from pea-size to more than an inch in diameter. Though diverticulosis often produces no symptoms, food can get trapped in these pouches, which then become inflamed and infected. The result is diverticulitis, whose symptoms are impossible to ignore.

What Causes It

Most cases of diverticulosis probably stem from a low-fiber diet. A lack of fiber means the colon must work harder to pass the stool, and straining during bowel movements can aggravate the condition. A diet low in fiber also increases the likelihood of diverticulitis because waste moves slowly, allowing more time for food particles to become trapped and cause inflammation or infection. And lack of exercise makes the colon contents sluggish. The tendency toward such disorders may run in families.

What is fiber?
Fiber is a substance in foods that comes from plants. Fiber helps soften stool so it moves smoothly through the colon and is easier to pass. Soluble fiber dissolves in water and is found in beans, fruit, and oat products. Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water and is found in whole-grain products and vegetables. Both kinds of fiber help prevent constipation.

Constipation is a condition in which an adult has fewer than three bowel movements a week or has bowel movements with stools that are hard, dry, and small, making them painful or difficult to pass.

High-fiber foods also have many benefits in preventing and controlling chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and cancer.

Diagnosis:
Based on symptoms and severity of illness, a person may be evaluated and diagnosed by a primary care physician, an emergency department physician, a surgeon, or a gastroenterologist—a doctor who specializes in digestive diseases.

The health care provider will ask about the person’s health, symptoms, bowel habits, diet, and medications, and will perform a physical exam, which may include a rectal exam. A rectal exam is performed in the health care provider’s office; anesthesia is not needed. To perform the exam, the health care provider asks the person to bend over a table or lie on one side while holding the knees close to the chest. The health care provider slides a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum. The exam is used to check for pain, bleeding, or a blockage in the intestine.

The health care provider may schedule one or more of the following tests:

Blood test. A blood test involves drawing a person’s blood at a health care provider’s office, a commercial facility, or a hospital and sending the sample to a lab for analysis. The blood test can show the presence of inflammation or anemia—a condition in which red blood cells are fewer or smaller than normal, which prevents the body’s cells from getting enough oxygen.

*Computerized tomography (CT) scan. A CT scan of the colon is the most common test used to diagnose diverticular disease. CT scans use a combination of x rays and computer technology to create three-dimensional (3–D) images. For a CT scan, the person may be given a solution to drink and an injection of a special dye, called contrast medium. CT scans require the person to lie on a table that slides into a tunnel-shaped device where the x rays are taken. The procedure is performed in an outpatient center or a hospital by an x-ray technician, and the images are interpreted by a radiologist—a doctor who specializes in medical imaging. Anesthesia is not needed. CT scans can detect diverticulosis and confirm the diagnosis of diverticulitis.

*Lower gastrointestinal (GI) series. A lower GI series is an x-ray exam that is used to look at the large intestine. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by an x-ray technician, and the images are interpreted by a radiologist. Anesthesia is not needed. The health care provider may provide written bowel prep instructions to follow at home before the test. The person may be asked to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the procedure. A laxative or enema may be used before the test. A laxative is medication that loosens stool and increases bowel movements. An enema involves flushing water or laxative into the rectum using a special squirt bottle. These medications cause diarrhea, so the person should stay close to a bathroom during the bowel prep.

For the test, the person will lie on a table while the radiologist inserts a flexible tube into the person’s anus. The colon is filled with barium, making signs of diverticular disease show up more clearly on x rays.
For several days, traces of barium in the large intestine can cause stools to be white or light colored. Enemas and repeated bowel movements may cause anal soreness. A health care provider will provide specific instructions about eating and drinking after the test.

*Colonoscopy. The test is performed at a hospital or an outpatient center by a gastroenterologist. Before the test, the person’s health care provider will provide written bowel prep instructions to follow at home. The person may need to follow a clear liquid diet for 1 to 3 days before the test. The person may also need to take laxatives and enemas the evening before the test.
In most cases, light anesthesia, and possibly pain medication, helps people relax for the test. The person will lie on a table while the gastroenterologist inserts a flexible tube into the anus. A small camera on the tube sends a video image of the intestinal lining to a computer screen. The test can show diverticulosis and diverticular disease.

Cramping or bloating may occur during the first hour after the test. Driving is not permitted for 24 hours after the test to allow the anesthesia time to wear off. Before the appointment, people should make plans for a ride home. Full recovery is expected by the next day, and people should be able to go back to their normal diet.

Treatment:
A health care provider may treat the symptoms of diverticulosis with a high-fiber diet or fiber supplements, medications, and possibly probiotics. Treatment for diverticular disease varies, depending on whether a person has diverticulitis or diverticular bleeding.

Diverticulosis
High-fiber diet. Studies have shown that a high-fiber diet can help prevent diverticular disease in people who already have diverticulosis.2 A health care provider may recommend a slow increase in dietary fiber to minimize gas and abdominal discomfort. For more information about fiber-rich foods, see “Eating, Diet, and Nutrition.”

Fiber supplements. A health care provider may recommend taking a fiber product such as methylcellulose (Citrucel) or psyllium (Metamucil) one to three times a day. These products are available as powders, pills, or wafers and provide 0.5 to 3.5 grams of fiber per dose. Fiber products should be taken with at least 8 ounces of water.

Medications. A number of studies suggest the medication mesalazine (Asacol), given either continuously or in cycles, may be effective at reducing abdominal pain and GI symptoms of diverticulosis. Research has also shown that combining mesalazine with the antibiotic rifaximin (Xifaxan) can be significantly more effective than using rifaximin alone to improve a person’s symptoms and maintain periods of remission, which means being free of symptoms.4

Probiotics. Although more research is needed, probiotics may help treat the symptoms of diverticulosis, prevent the onset of diverticulitis, and reduce the chance of recurrent symptoms. Probiotics are live bacteria, like those normally found in the GI tract. Probiotics can be found in dietary supplements—in capsules, tablets, and powders—and in some foods, such as yogurt.

To help ensure coordinated and safe care, people should discuss their use of complementary and alternative medical practices, including their use of dietary supplements and probiotics, with their health care provider. Read more at www.nccam.nih.gov/health/probioticsExternal NIH Link.

How Supplements Can Help

Although supplements cannot reverse diverticulosis once a pouch has developed, they (and changes in your diet) can help prevent or ease flare-ups. Providing fiber that forms bulk, psyllium acts to relieve or prevent constipation. Ground flaxseeds are also rich in fiber and ward off infection by keeping intestinal pouches clear. These two can be taken together long term first thing in the morning to assist with the initial bowel movement, along with probiotics such as acidophilus. The fiber helps protect the acidophilus from stomach acids and carries it into the intestine, where it alters the bacterial balance in the digestive tract, enabling the body to fight off intestinal infections. Acidophilus is especially important if you’re taking antibiotics during a flare-up.

What Else You Can Do

Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to boost your fiber intake to 20 to 30 grams a day.
Drink at least eight 8-ounce glasses of water or other fluids every day.
Exercise regularly to help prevent constipation. And if you become constipated, take advantage of natural laxatives, such as prunes.

Supplement Recommendations

Psyllium
Flaxseeds
Acidophilus
Aloe Vera Juice
Glutamine
Slippery Elm
Chamomile
Wild Yam/Peppermint/ Valerian

Psyllium
Dosage: 1 tbsp. powder dissolved in water or juice twice a day.
Comments: Be sure to drink extra water throughout the day.

Flaxseeds
Dosage: 2 tbsp. ground flaxseeds in glass of water twice a day.
Comments: Be sure to drink extra water throughout the day.

Acidophilus
Dosage: 2 pills twice a day between meals.
Comments: Get 1-2 billion live (viable) organisms per pill.

Aloe Vera Juice
Dosage: 1/2 cup juice twice a day.
Comments: Containing 98% aloe vera and no aloin or aloe-emodin.

Glutamine
Dosage: 500 mg L-glutamine twice a day on an empty stomach.
Comments: When using for longer than 1 month, add a mixed amino acid complex (follow package directions).

Slippery Elm
Dosage: 1 cup bark powder, prepared like hot cereal each morning.
Comments: Or use tea (1 tsp. per cup) 3 times a day.

Chamomile
Dosage: As a tea, 1 cup 3 times a day.
Comments: Use 2 tsp. dried herb per cup of hot water; steep for 10 minutes, then strain. Alternatively, try melissa tea.

Wild Yam/Peppermint/ Valerian
Dosage: 1 cup tea 3 or 4 times a day.
Comments: Use 2 parts wild yam, 1 part peppermint, 1 part valerian per cup of hot water; steep 10 minutes, strain. Sweeten to taste.

Resources:

 http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/digestive-diseases/diverticular-disease/Pages/facts.aspx#cause

 Your Guide to Vitamins, Minerals, and Herbs(Reader’s Digest)

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Baking Soda Is A Super Item

Here are dozens of reasons why baking soda is a super item.In the Kitchen
Clean your produce

You can’t be too careful when it comes to food handling and preparation. Wash fruits and vegetables in a pot of cold water with 2-3 table-spoons baking soda; the baking soda will remove some of the impurities tap water leaves behind. Or put a small amount of baking soda on a wet sponge or vegetable brush and scrub your produce. Give everything a thorough rinsing before serving.

Tenderize meat

Got a tough cut of meat on your hands? Soften it up by giving it a rubdown in baking soda. Let it sit (in the refrigerator, of course) for three to five hours, then rinse it off well before cooking.

Soak out fish smells

Get rid of that fishy smell from your store-bought flounder filets and fish steaks by soaking the raw fish for about an hour (inside your refrigerator) in 1 quart (1 liter) water with 2 tablespoons baking soda. Rinse the fish well and pat dry before cooking.

Reduce acids in recipes

If you or someone in your family is sensitive to the high-acid content of tomato-based sauces or coffee, you can lower the overall acidity by sprinkling in a pinch of baking soda while cooking (or, in the case of coffee, before brewing). A bit of baking soda can also counteract the taste of vinegar if you happen to pour in a bit too much. Be careful not to overdo it with the soda, though — if you add too much, the vinegar-baking soda combination will start foaming.

Bake better beans

Do you love baked beans but not their aftereffects? Adding a pinch of baking soda to baked beans as they’re cooking will significantly reduce their gas-producing properties.

Fluff up your omelets

Want to know the secret to making fluffier omelets? For every three eggs used, add 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. Shhhh! Don’t let it get around.

Use as yeast substitute

Need a stand-in for yeast when making dough? If you have some powdered vitamin C (or citric acid) and baking soda on hand, you can use a mixture of the two instead. Just mix in equal parts to equal the quantity of yeast required. What’s more, the dough you add it to won’t have to rise before baking.

Rid hands of food odors

Chopping garlic or cleaning a fish can leave their “essence” on your fingers long after the chore is done. Get those nasty food smells off your hands by simply wetting them and vigorously rubbing with about 2 teaspoons baking soda instead of soap. The smell should wash off with the soda.

Clean baby bottles and accessories

Here’s some great advice for new parents: Keep all your baby bottles, nipples, caps, and brushes “baby fresh” by soaking them overnight in a container filled with hot water and half a box of baking soda. Be sure to give everything a good rinsing afterward, and to dry thoroughly before using. Baby bottles can also be boiled in a full pot of water and 3 tablespoons baking soda for three minutes.

Clean a cutting board

Keep your wooden or plastic cutting board clean by occasionally scrubbing it with a paste made from 1 tablespoon each baking soda, salt, and water. Rinse thoroughly with hot water.

Clear a clogged drain

Most kitchen drains can be unclogged by pouring in 1 cup baking soda followed by 1 cup hot vinegar (simply heat it up in the microwave for 1 minute). Give it several minutes to work, then add 1 quart (1 liter) boiling water. Repeat if necessary. If you know your drain is clogged with grease, use 1/2 cup each of baking soda and salt followed by 1 cup boiling water. Let the mixture work overnight; then rinse with hot tap water in the morning.

Boost potency of dishwashing liquid

Looking for a more powerful dishwashing liquid? Try adding 2 tablespoons baking soda to the usual amount of liquid you use, and watch it cut through grease like a hot knife!

Make your own dishwashing detergent

The dishwasher is fully loaded when you discover that you’re out of your usual powdered dishwashing detergent. What do you do? Make your own: Combine 2 tablespoons baking soda with 2 tablespoons borax. You may be so pleased with the results you’ll switch for good.

Deodorize your dishwasher

Eliminate odors inside your automatic dishwasher by sprinkling 1/2 cup baking soda on the bottom of the dishwasher between loads. Or pour in half a box of baking soda and run the empty machine through its rinse cycle.

Clean your refrigerator

To get rid of smells and dried-up spills inside your refrigerator, remove the contents, then sprinkle some baking soda on a damp sponge and scrub the sides, shelves, and compartments. Rinse with a clean, wet sponge. Don’t forget to place a fresh box of soda inside when you’re done.

Clean your microwave

To clean those splatters off the inside of your microwave, put a solution of 2 tablespoons baking soda in 1 cup water in a microwave-safe container and cook on High for 2-3 minutes. Remove the container, then wipe down the microwave’s moist interior with a damp paper towel.

Remove coffee and tea stains from china

Don’t let those annoying coffee and/or tea stains on your good china spoil another special occasion. Remove them by dip-ping a moist cloth in baking soda to form a stiff paste and gently rubbing your cups and saucers. Rinse clean and dry, then set your table with pride.

Clean a thermos

To remove residue on the inside of a thermos, mix 1/4 cup baking soda in 1 quart (1 liter) water. Fill the thermos with the solution — if necessary, give it a going-over with a bottle brush to loosen things up — and let it soak overnight. Rinse clean before using.

Freshen a sponge or towel

When a kitchen sponge or dish towel gets that distinctly sour smell, soak it overnight in 2 tablespoons baking soda and a couple of drops of antibacterial dish soap dissolved in 1 pint (450 milliliters) warm water. The following morning, squeeze out the remaining solution and rinse with cold water. It should smell as good as new.

Remove stains and scratches on countertops

Is your kitchen countertop covered with stains or small knife cuts? Use a paste of 2 parts baking soda to 1 part water to “rub out” most of them. For stubborn stains, add a drop of chlorine bleach to the paste. Immediately wash the area with hot, soapy water to pre-vent the bleach from causing fading.

Shine up stainless steel and chrome trim

To put the shine back in your stainless steel sink, sprinkle it with baking soda, then give it a rubdown — moving in the direction of the grain — with a moist cloth. To polish dull chrome trim on your appliances, pour a little baking soda onto a damp sponge and rub over the chrome. Let it dry for an hour or so, then wipe down with warm water and dry with a clean cloth.

Get rid of grease stains on stovetops

Say good-bye to cooked-on grease stains on your stovetop or backsplash. First wet them with a little water and cover them with a bit of baking soda. Then rub them off with a damp sponge or towel.

Clean an automatic coffeemaker

Properly caring for your automatic coffeemaker means never having to worry about bitter or weak coffee. Every two weeks or so, brew a pot of 1 quart (1 liter) water mixed with 1/4 cup baking soda, followed by a pot of clean water. Also, sweeten your coffeemaker’s plastic basket by using an old toothbrush to give it an occasional scrubbing with a paste of 2 tablespoons baking soda and 1 tablespoon water. Rinse thoroughly with cold water when done.

Care for your coffeepots and teapots

Remove mineral deposits in metal coffeepots and teapots by filling them with a solution of 1 cup vinegar and 4 tablespoons baking soda. Bring the mixture to a boil, then let simmer for five minutes. Or try boiling 5 cups water with 2 tablespoons soda and the juice of half a lemon. Rinse with cold water when done. To get off annoying exterior stains, wash your pots with a plastic scouring pad in a solution of 1/4 cup baking soda in 1 quart (1 liter) warm water. Follow up with a cold-water rinse.

Remove stains from nonstick cookware

It may be called nonstick cookware, but a few of those stains seem to be stuck on pretty well. Blast them away by boiling 1 cup water mixed with 2 tablespoons baking soda and 1/2 cup vinegar for 10 minutes. Then wash in hot, soapy water. Rinse well and let dry, then season with a bit of salad oil.

Clean cast-iron cookware

Although it’s more prone to stains and rust than the nonstick variety, many folks swear by their iron cookware. You can remove even the toughest burned-on food remnants in your iron pots by boiling 1 quart (1 liter) water with 2 tablespoons baking soda for five minutes. Pour off most of the liquid, then lightly scrub it with a plastic scrub pad. Rinse well, dry, and season with a few drops of peanut oil.

Clean burned or scorched pots and pans

It usually takes heavy-duty scrubbing to get scorched-on food off the bottom of a pot or pan. But you can make life much easier for yourself by simply boiling a few cups of water (enough to get the pan about 1/4 full) and adding 5 tablespoons baking soda. Turn off the heat, and let the soda settle in for a few hours or overnight. When you’re ready, that burned-on gunk will practically slip right off.

Deodorize your garbage pail

Does something smell “off” in your kitchen? Most likely, it’s emanating from your trash can. But some smells linger even after you dispose of the offending garbage bag. So, be sure to give your kitchen garbage pail an occasional cleaning with a wet paper towel dipped in baking soda (you may want to wear rubber gloves for this). Rinse it out with a damp sponge, and let it dry before inserting a new bag. You can also ward off stinky surprises by sprinkling a little baking soda into the bottom of your pail before inserting the bag.
Links will show Uses in Other Places:
Taken from:Extraordinary Uses For Ordinary Things