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Arabis caucasica

Botanical

Name : Arabis caucasica
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Arabis
Species:A. caucasica
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Brassicales

Synonyms : A. albida.

Common Names: Rock Cress, Wall Rockcress, Garden arabis, Mountain rock cress or Caucasian rockcress.

Habitat : Arabis caucasica is native to S.E. Europe – Mediterranean. Occasionally naturalized in Britain. It grows on the mountain rocks and dry sites.

Description:
Arabis caucasica is an evergreen perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in leaf 12-Jan and in flower from Jan to May, and the seeds ripen from Apr to June. It has white hermaphrodite flowers, pollinated by bees.

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Cultivation:
Easily grown in ordinary well-drained soil. Prefers a poor soil. Succeeds in partial shade though it tends to become straggly. Established plants are very tolerant of drought and grow very well on a dry bank, they also succeed when grown in walls. A very ornamental plant, it is hardy to about -15°c, but can be rather invasive. There are some named varieties selected for their ornamental value. A good butterfly and moth plant[30]. Bees are attracted to the flowers. Plants resent root disturbance and are best put in their final positions whilst still small. This species is closely related to A. alpina. Special Features: Attractive foliage.

Propagation:
Seed – it is best to surface sow the seed as soon as it is ripe in a light position in a cold frame. Seed can also be sown in spring. It usually germinates in 2 – 3 weeks at 21°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division after flowering. Very easy, the divisions can be planted out straight into their permanent positions if required. Cuttings in a shady border in summer.
Edible Uses:….The leaves are used as a garnish in much the same way as watercress. They are also sometimes used as a potherb.

Medicinal Uses: Could not find anywhere.

Other Uses:
Landscape Uses:Alpine garden, Border, Ground cover, Rock garden.A good ground cover plant for sunny positions, forming a carpet

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabis_caucasica
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Arabis+caucasica

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Mañgoñgot

Botanical Name :Clerodendrum inerme (Linn.) Gaertn
Family : Verbenaceae

Other Scientific Names:  Clerodendrum commersonii Spreng.,Clerodendrum nerifolium Wall. ,Volkameria commersonii Poir.,Volkameria inermis Linn. ,Volkameria nereifolia Roxb.,Clerodendrum capsulare Blanco,

Common Names: Gaertn. Ang-angri (Ilk.),Baliseng (Bis.),Busel-busel (Ilk.),Mañgoñgot (Tag.),Samin-añga (Sul.),Tabang-oñgong (P. Bis.),Seaside clerodendron (Engl.) ,Garden quinine (Engl.) ,Sorcerer’s bush (Engl.),Wild jasmine (Engl.) ,Ku lang shu (Chin.)

Habitat : Mañgoñgot is found along the seashore and beside tidal streams throughout the Philippines. It also occurs in India to Formosa, and through Malaya to tropical Australia and Polynesia.

Description:
This plant is an erect or somewhat straggling shrub 1 to 4 meters high. The leaves are ovate, oblong-ovate, or elliptic-ovate, 4 to 8 centimeters long, 2 to 5 centimeters wide, shinning, smooth, entire, and pointed at the tip. The inflorescence (cyme) is usually composed of three flowers and is borne in the axils of the leaves. The calyx is green, narrowly funnel-shaped, and furnished with 5 very short teeth. The corolla is about 3 centimeters long and comprises a slender, white tube spreading, purple-tinged lobes which are about 7 millimeters long. The stamens are long-exserted, and purple. The fruit is obovoid, about 1.5 centimeters long, and splitting into 4 pyrenes. The calyx in the fruit is about 1 centimeter in diameter.

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Medicinal Uses:
Parts used: Root, leaves.

Constituents:
* Leaves yield a bitter principle that is entirely removed by ether; and treatment with alcohol and water yields extracts free from bitterness. The bitter principle shows a resemblance to Chiretta (Swertia chirata), a gentianaceous plant.
* Leaves also yield a fragrant stearoptin with an apple-like odor; resin; gum; brown coloring matter; and ash containing a large amount of sodium chloride (24.01% of the ash).
* Study of hexane extract of the aerial parts isolated an aliphatic glucoside characterized as pentadecanoic acid-ß-D-glucoside. A butanol extract yielded acacetin and apigenin.

Properties:
*Leaves are mucilaginous and fragrant.
*Considered alterative, febrifuge and resolvent.

Folkloric
*In the Philippines, root decoction is used as febrifuge and alterative.
*Leaves are used in poultices as resolvent.
*Elsewhere, the root, boiled in oil, is applied like a liniment for rheumatism.
*In Guam, the bitter root, leaves and wood are used by natives as a remedy for intermittent fevers.
*Poultices of leaves used for swellings to prevent suppuration.
*Leaves and roots, in tincture and decoction, used as substitute for quinine.
*Juice of leaves and root used as alterative in scrofulous and venereal diseases.
*Poultices of leaves applied to resolve buboes.
*Leaf bath recommended for mani and for itches.
*At one time, sailors of Macassar were reported to take the fruit, seeds and roots to sea, and a decoction or pounded seeds were ingested when taken sick by ingestion of poisonous fish and crabs.
*Leaves, eaten with rice, used to increase the appetite.
*In Java, fruit used as medicine for dysentery.
*In Africa, used to treat hypertension.
*In traditional Indian medicine, leaves used for treating fever, cough, skin rahses, boils; also, for treating umbilical cord infection and cleaning the uterus.

Studies :
• Megastigmane / Iridoid Glucosides: Study of aerial parts of C. inerme yielded two megastimane glucosides (sammangaosides A and B) and an iridoid glucoside (sammangaoside C) with 15 known compounds.
Hepatoprotective: Study of ethanolic extract of C. inerme leaves in CCl4-induced liver damage in Swiss albino rats showed hepatoprotective activity with significant reduction of liver enzymes ALT, AST and alkaline phosphatase, with significant increase in glutathione level.
Hypotensive Activity: Study of aqueous extract of Clerodendrum inerme leaves showed a hypotensive effect attributted to the presence of chemical elements such as alkaloids and polyphenols. Results support its traditional use for its hypotensive effect.
• Antifungal: Study of the ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of leaves and stems of C. inerme and C. phlomidis showed both inhibited inhibition of all plant and human pathogenic fungi. The leaf extract of C. inerme inhibited plant pathogenic fungi better than the human dermatophytes.
• Antioxidant / Free Radical Scavenging Activity: Study of methanolic extract of leaves of C. inerme showed free radical scavenging activity increasing with concentration, with maximum activity at 2500 mg/mL. Antioxidant activity may be due to phenolic compounds.
• Antibacterial / Wound Healing: Study of methanol, ethyl acetate and aqueous extracts showed significant inhibition against 15 of 18 bacterial tested. Results clearly showed the leaves were effective in controlling bacterial pathogens, particular gram positive bacteria. Results also confirmed its utility as a wound-healing agent.
• Anti-Inflammatory / Analgesic: Study of the methanol extract of C. inerme in animal models exhibited anti-inflammatory activty. In addition, it showed significant analgesic activity in acetic acid induced-writhing model. The effects were attributed largely to its antioxidant and lysosomal membrane stabilizing effects.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.bpi.da.gov.ph/Publications/mp/pdf/m/mangongot.pdf
http://www.stuartxchange.com/Mangongot.html

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Allemanda cathartica

Botanical Name :Allemanda cathartica Linn
Family: Apocynaceae
Genus: Allamanda
Species: A. cathartica
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales

Syn.:  Allamanda cathartica Linn, Allamanda hendersonii Bull, Allamanda augustifolia Pohl

Common Names: :Golden trumpet, Harkakra, Campenilla, The cup of gold, Willow leaved Allamanda, Haladilu, Kolaambi, Jaharisontakka,.Kampanero (Tag.),Campanilla (Span., Tag.) Kampanero (Tag.) ,Kampanilya (Tag.) ,Kompanaria (Tag.), Yellow allamanda (Engl.) ,Yellow bell (Engl.) ,Golden trumpet (Engl.)  Cherries jubilee allamanda (Engl.) Huang ying (Chin.)

Local names: Campanilla (Sp., Tag.); kampanero (Tag.); kompanaria (Tag.); golden trumpet (Engl.).

Habitat :Native from Brazil.   Allemanda cathartica  was introduced from tropical America and is now cultivated for ornamental purposes. It is occasionally semi-established in thickets near dwellings or settlements.

Description:
This plant is a smooth or somewhat hairy shrub 2 to 4 meters in height. The leaves grow in whorls of three or four, though the uppermost ones may be scattered, and are lanceolate or oblanceolate, 8 to 12 centimeters long, 2.5 to 4 centimeters wide, and pointed at both ends. The yellow flowers are shortly stalked. The calyx-teeth are green, somewhat spreading, lanceolate, and 1 to 1.5 centimeters long. The corolla is about 7 centimeters long; the slender part os the tube being 3 centimeters long; the tube is then inflated up to 2 centimeters in diameter; the lobes are ovate or oblong-ovate, spreading, rounded, and about 2 centimeters long.
Its large flowers are very fragrant. This South American plant is thought to blossom best in full sunshine, and well drained soil.
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Constituents: Phytochemical studies revealed the main constituents to be alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and carbohydrates.
The whole plant is reported to be poisonous.Contains allamandin, a toxic iridoid lactone.As the name implies, the leaves, roots and flowers may be used in preparing a powerful cathartic. Milky sap is considered antibacterial, possibly anticancer.

Medicinal Uses:
Parts utilized: Leaves and bark.

Purgative, cathartic with hydrogogue effect, healing, diuretic.
In the Philippines, whole plant is considered poisonous.

Folkloric
*The plant draws its name from Allamand, who made the plant known a century and a half ago, who used a cathartic infusion of the leaves for colic.
*Infusion of leaves in moderate doses is an excellent cathartic; in considerable doses, it is purgative and a violent emetic.
*The bark and latex in small doses are considered cathartic; in large doses, poisonous.
*Decoction of the bark is a hydragogue; infusion of leaves is cathartic.
*Decoction of leaves in small doses used as antidote for poisoning.
*Extract of leaves used for colic and as laxative; in large doses causes diarrhea and vomiting.
*In Trinidad, used for treating malaria and jaundice.
*In Guiana, the latex is used as a purgative and employed for colics.
*In Surinam, the plant is used as a cathartic.

This plant is cited in Flora Brasiliensis by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius.It is mainly used to treat malaria.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Studies
:
• Purgative Effect: Findings suggest AC leaf extracts can elicit a purgative effect by increasing intestinal motility, in part, via muscarinic receptor activaton.
Wound Healing: The study of aqueous extract showed significant wound healing activity in wound models studies with decrease epithelialisation time, high skin breaking strength, and increase in granulation tissue weight and hydroxyproliing content. The Allamanda leaf extract possesses better wound healing activity than the Laurus nobilis.
• Reversible Antifertility Effect: The study on the oral administration of aqueous leaf extract of AC showed reversible suppression of fertility in male mice – organ weight,, testosterone levels, sperm parameters among others – without detectable toxic effects.
• Antidermatophytic: Plumeride, an active principle isolated from the leaves of AC showed strong fungitoxicity against some dermatophytes causing dermatomycosis to both humans and animals.
• Purgative Effect : Study showed the aqueous extract of leaves of Ac could produce a purgative effect by increasing intestinal motility, partly through muscarinic receptor activation.
Anti-Proliferative / Cytotoxic: Study evaluated the anti-proliferative effect of A. blanchetti and A. schottii on K562 leukemic cells. Results showed both plants exhibited cytostatic and cytotoxic activity, the most active were located in the roots.
• Antimicrobial: Study of leaf extract of A. cathartic showed antimicrobial activity – the chloroform extract showed significant activity against Shigella dysenteriae, moderate activity against B subtilis, P aeruginosa and a niger.
Bioactive Iridoids / Cytotoxic: Study of ethanol extract of A cathartica and H fallax isolated a weakly cytotoxic isoplumericin and plumericin.

Resources:
http://www.bpi.da.gov.ph/Publications/mp/pdf/c/campanilla.pdf
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allamanda_cathartica
http://www.stuartxchange.org/Kampanilya.html
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