Tag Archives: Benzoin resin

Mentha cunninghamia

 

Botanical Name: Mentha cunninghamia
Family: Lamiaceae
Subfamily: Nepetoideae
Tribe: Mentheae
Genus: Mentha
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Synonyms: Mentha consimilis

Common Names: Mint or Mentha

Habitat: Mentha cunninghamia is native to New Zealand. It grows on lowland to higher montane grassland and rather open places throughout North, South, Stewart and Chatham Islands.

Description:
Mentha cunninghamia is aperennial plant.
It is not frost tender. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.It is noted for attracting wildlife.

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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
We do not have much information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors at least in the milder parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in most soils and situations so long as the soil is not too dry. Prefers a slightly acid soil. Grows well in heavy clay soils. A sunny position is best for production of essential oils, but succeeds in partial shade. Most mints have fairly aggressive spreading roots and, unless you have the space to let them roam, they need to be restrained by some means such as planting them in containers that are buried in the soil. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus. The whole plant has a mint-like smell. The flowers are very attractive to bees and butterflies. A good companion plant for growing near cabbages and tomatoes, helping to deter insect pests. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Germination is usually fairly quick. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer. Mentha species are very prone to hybridisation and so the seed cannot be relied on to breed true. Even without hybridisation, seedlings will not be uniform and so the content of medicinal oils etc will vary. When growing plants with a particular aroma it is best to propagate them by division. Division can be easily carried out at almost any time of the year, though it is probably best done in the spring or autumn to allow the plant to establish more quickly. Virtually any part of the root is capable of growing into a new plant. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. However, for maximum increase it is possible to divide the roots up into sections no more than 3cm long and pot these up in light shade in a cold frame. They will quickly become established and can be planted out in the summer.
Medicinal Uses:
Diaphoretic. A tea made from the leaves of most mint species has traditionally been used in the treatment of fevers, headaches, digestive disorders and various minor ailments. The leaves are harvested as the plant comes into flower and can be dried for later use. The essential oil in the leaves is antiseptic, though it is toxic in large doses.

Other Uses:
Rats and mice intensely dislike the smell of mint. The plant was therefore used in homes as a strewing herb and has also been spread in granaries to keep the rodents off the grain.

Known Hazards: Although no records of toxicity have been seen for this species, large quantities of some members of this genus, especially when taken in the form of the extracted essential oil, can cause abortions so some caution is advised.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mentha
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Mentha+cunninghamia

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Styrax benzoin

Botanical Name :Styrax benzoin
Family: Styracaceae
Genus: Styrax
Species: S. benzoin
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales

Synonyms:  Gum Benzoin. Gun Benjamin. Siam Benzoin. Sumatra Benzoin.

Common Names:Gum benjamin tree, Loban(in Arabic), Kemenyan(in Indonesia and Malaysia), Onycha, , Siam, Sumatra and Java.

Habitat :Styrax benzoin is a species of tree native to Sumatra in Indonesia.

Description:
It is a common member of the forests of Sumatra, where it grows to about 12 meters in maximum height.

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Benzoin is a balsamic resin. Normally the trees do not produce it or any substance analogous to it, but the infliction of a wound sufficiently severe to injure the cambium results in the formation of numerous oleoresin ducts in which the secretion is produced, it is, therefore, a pathological product. The trunk of the tree is hacked with an axe, and after a time the liquid Benzoin either accumulates beneath the bark or exudes from the incisions.CLICK & SEE   When it has sufficiently hardened it is collected and exported, either in the form of loose pieces (tears) or in masses packed in oblong boxes or in tins; several varieties are known, but Siam and Sumatra Benzoins are the most important. The incisions are made when the tree is seven years old, and in Sumatra each tree yields about 3 lb. annually for ten or twelve years. The first three years’ collections give the finest Benzoin; after that the runnings are known as the ‘belly,’ and finally the tree is cut down and the resin scraped out, this being termed the ‘foot.’ Siam Benzoin externally is reddish yellow, internally milky white, has an agreeable odour, recalling vanilla, contains benzoic acid but not cinnamic acid. Sumatra Benzoin is always in blocks of a dull reddish or greyish-brown colour. Fine qualities have a strong storax-like odour, quite distinct from the vanilla odour of the Siamese variety. Sumatra Benzoin contains cinnamic acid.

Constituents:  The chief constituent of Siam Benzoin is benzoic acid (up to 38 per cent.), partly free and partly combined with benzoresinol and siaresinotannol; it also contains vanillin and an oily aromatic liquid. When quite pure it should be entirely soluble in alcohol and yield only traces of ash. Sumatra benzoin contains 18 per cent. or more of benzoic acid and about 20 per cent. of cinnamic acid the latter partly free and partly combined with benzoresinol and sumarisinotannol; it also contains 1 per cent. of vanillin, styrol, styracin, phenyl-prophyl cinnamate and benzaldehyde, all of which combine to produce its characteristic odour.

Medicinal Uses:
Properties: * AntiCancer * Antiperspirant/Deodorants * Antirheumatic * Aromatic * Cardiac tonic Cordial * Carminative * Circulation * Diuretic * Expectorant * Muscle Relaxant * Sedative * Vulnerary

* Aromatherapy * Asthma * Bronchitis * Eczema * Rheumatoid_arthritis
Properties: * AntiCancer * Antiperspirant/Deodorants * Antirheumatic * Aromatic * Cardiac tonic Cordial * Carminative * Circulation * Diuretic * Expectorant * Muscle Relaxant * Sedative * Vulnerary
It is used externally in the form of a tincture, diluted with water as a mild stimulant and antiseptic in irritable conditions of the skin. It acts as a carminative when taken internally is rapidly absorbed, and mildly expectorant diuretic and antiseptic to the urinary passages. In the form of Compound Tincture of Benzoin, it is used as an inhalant with steam in laryngitis and bronchitis. It is a preservative of fats, and is used for that purpose in Adips Benzoatus.

Skin Care: Use benzoin resin in external skin applications to heal cuts and sooth inflammation of rough cracked skin. Benzoin is indicated for use where there is redness, irritation, or itching, such as eczema. The dark, vanilla-like resin also acts as an anchoring base note for aromatherapy blends and as a fixative in perfumery.

Cold Conditions: Use Benzoin in massage blends and aromatherapy applications for all cold conditions of the respiratory system ( related to the lungs). Colds, influenza, coughs, and bronchitis all benefit from benzoin, as well as cold conditions of the joints such as gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Other Uses:
Styrax benzoin is cultivated as a main source of benzoin resin in Indonesia. It is also grown as an ornamental tree for shade in West Africa.

Safety Information:
Syntex benzoin resin may cause possible skin sensitivity and contact dermatitis.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

 

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Styrax_benzoin
http://www.anniesremedy.com/herb_detail5.php
http://www.aromaweb.com/essential-oils/benzoin-absolute.asp

http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/benzoi31.html

 

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