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Artemisia glacialis

Botanical Name: Artemisia glacialis
Family: Asteraceae
Tribe: Anthemideae
Genus: Artemisia
Species:A. glacialis
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asterales
Common Name : Glacier Wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia glacialis is native to C. Europe. It grows on exposed rocky slopes in the Alps. Schistose rocks and screes, 2000 – 3100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia glacialis is a perennial herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.3 m (1ft). The foilages are herbiculas and aeromatic and the plant is deer resistant.

The flower color is yellow & blooms during mid summer.The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought. CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Cultivation:
Requires a very well-drained light or medium soil and a sunny position. Very intolerant of winter wet. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Indiscriminate collection of this plant from the wild has made it an endangered species. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out[200]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: The herb is used as a flavouring in vermouth and liqueurs.
Medicinal Uses:

Digestive; Expectorant; Sedative; Stomachic.

Glacier wormwood has similar medicinal properties to common wormwood, A, absinthum. It is used locally where it grows wild. The whole plant is digestive, expectorant, sedative and stomachic. An infusion of the herb has a marked effect upon mountain sickness. A poultice of the plant is used as a first-aid remedy in the treatment of wounds.

Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resours:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_glacialis
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+glacialis
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51554/

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Carpenter’s Square

Botanical Name :Scrophularia marilandica
Family: Scrophulariaceae – Figwort family
Genus: Scrophularia L. – figwort
Species :Scrophularia marilandica L. – carpenter’s square
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division: Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Asteridae
Order:  Scrophulariales

Common Names:Late Figwort, Maryland Figwort, Carpenter’s Square, or Eastern Figwort

Habitat :Carpenter’s Square is native to throughout eastern and central North America, where it is found growing in dry woods from Manitoba and Quebec south to Texas and Florida.

Description:
Carpenter’s Square is a perennial  flowering plant, grows 1.5-3 m tall, with opposite, ovate leaves up to 15 cm long and 9 cm broad. The flowers are rounded, 8-9 mm long, with a cup-like mouth that look somewhat like a horse’s mouth with a bad overbite; they are a deep reddish-purple color on the inside, with a greenish to almost brown cast on the outside. They are commonly visited by hummingbirds in late summer...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
• Flower size: 1/4 inch across
Flower color: brown
• Flowering time: July to August
Cultivation:
Succeeds in most moist soils.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found it best to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in a lightly shaded position in a cold frame, planting them out once they are well established in the summer.

Medicinal Uses:

Alterative, appetizer, diaphoretic, vermifuge and vulnerary. A tea made from the roots is diuretic, emmenagogue and tonic. It has been used in the treatment of irregular menses, fevers and piles. A poultice made from the roots is a folk remedy for cancer. Carpenter’s square is said to have similar properties to the knotted figwort, S. nodosa. These properties are:- Knotted figwort is a plant that supports detoxification of the body and it may be used as a treatment for various kinds of skin disorders. The whole plant is alterative, anodyne, anti-inflammatory, diuretic, mildly purgative and stimulant. It is harvested as the plant comes into flower in the summer and can be dried for later use. A decoction is applied externally to sprains, swellings, burns, inflammations etc, and is said to be useful in treating chronic skin diseases, scrofulous sores and gangrene. The leaves can also be applied fresh or be made into an ointment. Internally, the plant is used in the treatment of chronic skin diseases (such as eczema, psoriasis and pruritis), mastitis, swollen lymph nodes and poor circulation. It should not be prescribed for patients with heart conditions. The root is anthelmintic.

A poultice was used to treat skin diseases such as impetigo and cradle cap. The entire plant was used as a tonic, to break a fever by increasing perspiration, to increase urine flow, and to cure intestinal worms. The bark of the plant and the roots were used as treatments for tuberculosis, scabies, and open wounds. The plant was used at various times to increase menstrual flow and treat hemorrhoids. A poultice made from the roots is a folk remedy for cancer. Carpenter’s square is said to have similar properties to the knotted figwort, S. nodosa: supports detoxification of the body and it may be used as a treatment for various kinds of skin disorders.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SCMA2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrophularia_marilandica
http://www.ct-botanical-society.org/galleries/scrophulariamari.html
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Scrophularia+marilandica