Tag Archives: Bitter melon

Deltoid Balsamroot(Balsamorhiza deltoidea)

Botanical Name : Balsamorhiza deltoidea
Family : Compositae / Asteraceae
Genus : Balsamorhiza
Common Namedeltoid balsamroot.
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Heliantheae
Species: B. deltoidea

Habitat : Western N. AmericaBritish Columbia to California.Open places but not on thin soils.


Description:

This is a taprooted perennial herb growing erect to a maximum height near 90 centimeters. The stems are hairy and glandular. The large leaves are up to 25 centimeters long and 20 wide, and are roughly triangular in shape, hairy and glandular, and often toothed along the edges. The inflorescence bears usually one or sometimes a few large flower heads, each lined with hairy, pointed phyllaries up to 4 centimeters long. The head has a center of yellowish disc florets and a fringe of pointed yellow ray florets each up to 4 or 5 centimeters long. The fruit is an achene 7 to 8 millimeters in length.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
It is hardy to zone 5. It is in flower from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and requires well-drained soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
Requires a deep fertile well-drained loam in full sun. Plants strongly resent winter wet. Hardy to at least -25°c. Plants are intolerant of root disturbance and should be planted into their permanent positions whilst still small.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 2 – 6 days at 18°c. Either sow the seed in individual pots or pot up the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle and plant them out into their permanent positions in the summer. Division in spring. Very difficult since the plant strongly resents root disturbance. It is probably best to take quite small divisions, or basal cuttings, without disturbing the main clump. Pot these up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in the greenhouse until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer if they have grown sufficiently, otherwise over-winter them in the greenhouse and plant out in late spring.

Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root; Seed.

Edible Uses: Coffee.

Root – raw or cooked. A sweet taste when cooked[161]. Young shoots – raw. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be ground into a powder and made into a bread. The ground seeds can be formed into cakes and eaten raw. The roasted root is a coffee substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
Miscellany.
A decoction of the split roots has been used in the treatment of coughs and colds.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Balsamorhiza+deltoidea
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=BADE2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balsamorhiza_deltoidea
http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/potd/2007/04/balsamorhiza_deltoidea.php
http://www.pbase.com/rodg/image/78822814

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Ageratum Houstonianum

Botanical Name: Ageratum houstonianumBlue Danube
Family  : Compositae
Genus : Ageratum
Synonyms : Ageratum caeruleum – Hort., Ageratum mexicanumSims.
Common Name: ‘Blue Danube’ ageratum, ‘Blue Danube’ floss flower

Habitat: South-western N. AmericaMexico. An occasional garden escape in Britain.  Pine woods and cultivated ground.

Description:

It is hardy to zone 8. It is in flower from June to October, and the seeds ripen from August to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies).

click & see the pictures.
Plant details:-
Height : 6 in. to 12 in.
Spread :  6 in. to 12 in.
Growth Habit :  Clumps
Growth Pace :  Fast Grower
Light :   Full Sun Only
Moisture:    Medium Moisture
Maintenance :    Low
Characteristics:    Attracts Butterflies; Showy Flowers
Bloom Time:    Early Fall; Late Summer; Summer
Flower Color :    Blue Flower
Uses :   Beds and Borders, Container
Style  :  Formal Garden
Seasonal Interest:    Summer Interest, Fall Interest
Type :  Annuals

Cultivation :
Grows well in ordinary garden soil. Requires a sheltered position in full sun[200]. This species is not hardy in the colder areas of the country, it tolerates temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c[200]. A very ornamental plant[1], the flowers are very attractive to butterflies[30]. The removal of dead flowers will extend the flowering season.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow March in a light position in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates in 1 – 3 weeks at 20°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out and plant them out after the last expected frosts.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires dry or moist soil.

Medicinal Uses
Anodyne.
The juice of the plant is used externally to treat cuts and wounds.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Ageratum+houstonianum
http://www.finegardening.com/plantguide/ageratum-houstonianum-blue-danube.aspx
https://www.anniesannuals.com/signs/a/ageratum_houstonium_b.htm
http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Asteraceae/Ageratum_houstonianum.html

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Cucumber

Image via Wikipedia:Cucumis sa

Botanical Name :Cucumis sativa
Family: Cucurbitaceae
Genus:     Cucumis
Species: C. sativus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Cucurbitales

Other Names:
Burmese: Thakhwa.
Danish: Agurk
Dutch: Komkommer
English: Cucumber, Cultivated cucumber
Finnish: Kurkku
French: Concombre
German: Gurke
Italian: Cetriolo
Hindi: Kheera (khira), Kakri, Kakdi, Tihu.

FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS .
The cucurbit family includes species such as the gourd, watermelons, cantaloupes, squash and pumpkins. Cucurbits are known as the vine crops due to their growth, habit, and culture. Most plants in this species have a spreading growth habit with tendrils at the leaf axils. These plants are warm season, tender annuals, that require hot weather to develop fruit.


Other family members include:

Benincasa hispida L.; Uax Gourd
Citrullus lunatus (Thung.) Mansf .; Watermelon
Citrullus lunatus var. citroides (Bailey) Mansf.; Citron, Preserving Melon
Cucumis anguria L.; West Indian Gherkin
Cucumis melo L. (Chito group); Mango Melon, Garden Lemon
Cucumis melo L. (Conomon group); Melon, Oriental Pickling Melon
Cucumis melo L. (Flexuosus group); Armonian Cucumber, Japanese Cucumber, Uri
Cucumis melo L. (Inodorus group); Melon, Muskmelon, Winter Melon
Cucumis melo L. (Reticulatus group); Melon, Muskmelon, Cantaloupe
Cucurbita maxima Dutch.; Winter Squash, Pumpkin
Cucurbita mixta Pang.; Pumpkin
Cucurbita moschata Poir.; Winter Squash, Pumpkin
Cucurbita pepo L.; Winter Squash, Marrow, Summer Squash, Pumpkin
Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl.; Bottle Gourd
Luffa acutangula Roxb.; Angled Loofah
Luffa cylindrica Roem.; Smooth Loofah
Momordica charantia L.; Bitter Gourd, Balsam Pear
Sechium edile S.W.; Chayote
Telfairia spp.; Oyster Nut
Trichosanthes anquina L.; Snake Gourd

.
History
The cucumber has been cultivated for at least 3,000 years in Western Asia, and was probably introduced to other parts of Europe by the Romans. Records of cucumber cultivation appear in France in the 9th Century, England in the 14th Century, and in North America by the mid-16th Century.

The cucumber was mentioned in the Bible, and was being grown in North Africa, Italy, Greece, Asia Minor, and other areas at the beginning of the Christian era. In England the crop was first introduced in the 1300s, but not cultivated until 250 years later. Columbus planted seeds in Haiti, and by 1539 cucumbers were grown in Florida by the natives, reaching Virginia by 1584. Today cucumbers are grown all over the world for pickling (picklers) and fresh markets (slicers). Cucumbers grown in greenhouses have traditionally been grown near cities, mostly in the northeastern U.S. The southwest has become an ideal place for greenhouse cucumber production because of high light intensities there.
Cucumis sativus Common slicing and pickling cucumber. They are the same species, used differently, yet the flavor and texture are very similar.
Cucumis anguria are the Gherkin type that originated from West India

Botany
The cucumber is a creeping vine that roots in the ground and grows up trellises or other supporting frames, wrapping around ribbing with thin, spiraling tendrils. The plant has large leaves that form a canopy over the fruit.

CLICK & SEE PICTURES OF CUCUMBER PLANT

The fruit is roughly cylindrical, elongated, with tapered ends, and may be as large as 60 cm long and 10 cm in diameter. Cucumbers grown to be eaten fresh (called slicers) and those intended for pickling (called picklers) are similar.

Varieties
English cucumbers can grow as long as 2 feet. They are nearly seedless and are sometimes marketed as “Burpless,” as the seeds give some people gas.
.
Japanese cucumbers (kyūri) are mild, slender, deep green, and have a bumpy, ridged skin. They can be used for slicing, salads, pickling, etc., and are available year-round.
Mediterranean cucumbers are small, smooth-skinned and mild. Like the English cucumber, Mediterranean cucumbers are nearly seedless.
.
Slicers grown commercially for the North American market are generally longer, smoother, more uniform in color, and have a tougher skin. Slicers in other countries are smaller and have a thinner, more delicate skin.In North America the term “wild cucumber” refers to manroot.

Click to see the picture

Cucumbers are fruit
Having an enclosed seed and developing from a flower, cucumbers are scientifically classified as a fruit. Much like tomatoes and squash, however, their sour-bitter flavor contributes to cucumbers being perceived, prepared and eaten as vegetables, despite the scientific classification.

As a food
The fruit is commonly harvested while still green, though generally after the fruits outgrow their spines. They are eaten as a vegetable, either raw, cooked, or made into pickled cucumbers. Although less nutritious than most fruit, the fresh cucumber is still a source of vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium, also providing dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin B6, thiamin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and manganese. Cucumbers are used in the decorative food art, garde manger.

Pickling
Main article: Pickled cucumber
Some people think cucumbers taste better pickled. Cucumbers can be pickled for flavour and longer shelf life. As compared to eating cucumbers, pickling cucumbers tend to be shorter, thicker, less regularly-shaped, and have bumpy skin with tiny white- or black-dotted spines. They are never waxed. Color can vary from creamy yellow to pale or dark green. Pickling cucumbers are sometimes sold fresh as “Kirby” or “Liberty” cucumbers. The pickling process removes or degrades much of the nutrient content, especially that of vitamin C. Pickled cucumbers are soaked in vinegar or brine or a combination, often along with various spices.

Parts Used
The edible parts are fruits, seeds and leaves.

Cucumbers grown for pickling (picklers) and those grown for fresh market (slicers) are the same species. Fruit of fresh market cucumbers are longer, smooth rather than bumpy, have a more uniform green skin color and a tougher, glossier skin than fruit of picklers.

Chemical constituents
The dietary value of Cucumber is negligible, there being upwards of 96 per cent water in its composition. The oil in the cucumber contains 22.3% linoleic acid, 58.5% oleic acid, 6.8% palmitic acid and 3.7% stearic acid.

The fresh cucumber is a very good source of vitamin C, vitamin K, and potassium. It also contains vitamin A, vitamin B6, thiamin, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, copper, and manganese.

Nutritional Value of cucumber:

Calories……………….39……….% Calories from Fat……………7.8
Total Fat (g)…………0.4………..% Calories from Carbohydrates….73.8
Saturated Fat (g)……..0.1………..% Calories from Protein……….18.5
Monounsaturated Fat (g)..0.0………..% Refuse……………………..3.0
Polyunsaturated Fat (g)..0.2………….Vitamin C (mg)……………..16
Cholesterol (mg)………0……………Vitamin A (i.u.)…………..647
Carbohydrate (g)………8.3………….Vitamin B6 (mg)……………..0.13
Dietary Fiber (g)……..2.4………….Vitamin B12 (mcg)……………0
Protein (g)…………..2.1………….Thiamin B1 (mg)……………..0.07
Sodium (mg)…………..6……………Riboflavin B2 (mg)…………..0.07
Potassium (mg)………433……………Folacin (mcg)………………39.1
Calcium (mg)…………42……………Niacin (mg)…………………0.7
Iron (mg)…………….0.8………….Caffeine (mg)……………….0.0
Zinc (mg)…………….0.6………….Alcohol (g)…………………0.0
.

Daily Values:

………………………..% Daily Value (2000 Cal diet)……… % Daily Value (2500 Cal diet)
Total Fat (g): 0.4………………1%…………………………………0%
Saturated Fat (g): 0.1…………..0%…………………………………0%
Cholesterol (mg): 0……………..0%…………………………………0%
Sodium (mg): 6………………….0%…………………………………0%
Carbohydrate (g): 8.3……………3%…………………………………2%
Dietary Fiber (g): 2.4…………..10%………………………………..8%
Protein (g): 2.1………………..4%…………………………………3%

Culinary Uses
They are eaten as a vegetable, raw or cooked, or made into pickled cucumbers.
The cucumber is a common ingredient of salads, being valued mainly for its crisp texture and juiciness.
The fruit is said to be indigestible due to the high cellulose content.

Medicinal Uses
The leaf juice is emetic; it is used to treat dyspepsia in children.
The seed is cooling, diuretic, tonic and vermifuge. The emulsion made by bruising Cucumber seeds and rubbing them up with water is much used in catarrhal infections and diseases of the bowels and urinary passages.
The fruit is depurative, diuretic, emollient, purgative and resolvent. The fresh fruit is used internally in the treatment of blemished skin, heat rash etc, and also used externally as a medicine for burns, sores.
A decoction of the root is diuretic.

Other Uses
The cucumber juice is the base of many beauty products.
The peculiarly refreshing odour of Cucumber has found application in perfumery.
Cucumber skins have been shown to repel cockroaches in laboratory experiments.
The fruit is applied to the skin as a cleansing cosmetic to soften and whiten it.

Plant profile at the Plants Database (http://plants.usda.gov/) – shows classification and distribution by US state.
A very brief history of the cucumber in America
Cucumber as health food
Ancient history of the cucumber
A brief article on cucumbers in Palestine
A brief article on cucumber history
Specifics, including history, on cucumbers and their varieties
Several plants listed from a work by Pliny the Elder
Source noting cucumbers in Ur in 3000 BC

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Help taken from:en.wikipedia.org and spicesmedicinalherbs.com

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Bitter Melon

Bitter melons being fried in Kaohsiung, Taiwan.Image via Wikipedia

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Botanical Name :Momordica charantia
Family: Cucurbitaceae
Genus: Momordica
Species: M. charantia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Cucurbitales

Common Names:Bitter melon, bitter gourd, bitter squash or balsam-pear  in English, has many other local names. Goya  from Okinawan and karela from Sanskrit are also used by English-language speakers.

Habitat :  Momordica charantia is a tropical and subtropical vine of the family Cucurbitaceae, widely grown for edible fruit, which is among the most bitter of all vegetables. English names for the plant and its fruit include bitter melon or bitter gourd (translated from Chinese: ??; pinyin: kugua). The original home of the species is not known, other than that it is a native of the tropics. It is widely grown in India, South Asia, The Philippines, Southeast Asia, China, Africa and the Caribbean.

Also known as Ku gua, the herbaceous, tendril-bearing vine grows to 5 m. It bears simple, alternate leaves 4-12 cm across, with 3-7 deeply separated lobes. Each plant bears separate yellow male and female flowers.

click to see the picture

Description: This herbaceous, tendril-bearing vine grows to 5 m. It bears simple, alternate leaves 4–12 cm across, with three to seven deeply separated lobes. Each plant bears separate yellow male and female flowers. In the Northern Hemisphere, flowering occurs during June to July and fruiting during September to November…..CLICK & SEE

The fruit has a distinct warty exterior and an oblong shape. It is hollow in cross-section, with a relatively thin layer of flesh surrounding a central seed cavity filled with large, flat seeds and pith. The fruit is most often eaten green, or as it is beginning to turn yellow. At this stage, the fruit’s flesh is crunchy and watery in texture, similar to cucumber, chayote or green bell pepper, but bitter. The skin is tender and edible. Seeds and pith appear white in unripe fruits; they are not intensely bitter and can be removed before cooking.

As the fruit ripens, the flesh (rind) becomes somewhat tougher and more bitter, and many consider it too distasteful to eat. On the other hand, the pith becomes sweet and intensely red; it can be eaten uncooked in this state, and is a popular ingredient in some Southeast Asian salads.

When the fruit is fully ripe, it turns orange and mushy, and splits into segments which curl back dramatically to expose seeds covered in bright red pulp.

The fruit has a distinct warty looking exterior and an oblong shape. It is hollow in cross-section, with a relatively thin layer of flesh surrounding a central seed cavity filled with large flat seeds and pith. Seeds and pith appear white in unripe fruits, ripening to red; they are intensely bitter and must be removed before cooking. The flesh is crunchy and watery in texture, similar to cucumber, chayote or green bell pepper. The skin is tender and edible. The fruit is most often eaten green. Although it can also be eaten when it has started to ripen and turn yellowish, it becomes more bitter as it ripens. The fully ripe fruit turns orange and mushy, is too bitter to eat, and splits into segments which curl back dramatically to expose seeds covered in bright red pulp.

Varieties:
Bitter melon comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. The cultivar common to China is 20–30 cm long, oblong with bluntly tapering ends and pale green in color, with a gently undulating, warty surface. The bitter melon more typical of India has a narrower shape with pointed ends, and a surface covered with jagged, triangular “teeth” and ridges. It is green to white in color. Between these two extremes are any number of intermediate forms. Some bear miniature fruit of only 6–10 cm in length, which may be served individually as stuffed vegetables. These miniature fruit are popular in Bangladesh, India (common name ‘Karela’), Pakistan, Nepal and other countries in South Asia. The sub-continent variety is most popular in Bangladesh and India.

click to see

Bitter Gourd comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. The typical Chinese phenotype is 20 to 30 cm long, oblong with bluntly tapering ends and pale green in color, with a gently undulating, warty surface. The bitter melon more typical of India has a narrower shape with pointed ends, and a surface covered with jagged, triangular “teeth” and ridges. Coloration is green or white. Between these two extremes are any number of intermediate forms. Some bear miniature fruit of only 6 – 10 cm in length, which may be served individually as stuffed vegetables. These miniature fruit are popular in Southeast Asia as well as India.(Its Indian name is Karala)

click to see

Bitter melon is commonly used as a vegetable in tropical areas such as East Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and South America. The plant gets its name from the bitter taste of its fruit and juice; however, cooking it with the appropriate spices can reduce the bitterness. In addition to being a food source, bitter melon is employed as an herbal remedy in many parts of the world. While the seeds, leaves and vines of bitter melon may all be used, the fruit is used most often for medicinal purposes.

At lease three types of compounds in bitter melon are believed to lower blood sugar, which can benefit people with diabetes mellitus. It is still unclear whether these compounds work together or individually, but several controlled clinical studies have confirmed that bitter melon is beneficial in controlling the symptoms of diabetes.

Test-tube studies have also shown that two proteins found in bitter melon — alpha-momorcharin and beta-momorcharin — inhibit the AIDS virus. However, these studies have not been conducted in humans.

Culinary uses:
Bitter melons are seldom mixed with other vegetables due to the strong bitter taste, although this can be moderated to some extent by salting and then washing the cut melon before use.

Bitter melon is often used in Chinese cooking for its bitter flavor, typically in stir-fries (often with pork and douchi), soups, and also as tea.

It is also a popular vegetable in Indian and Pakistani cooking, where it is often prepared with potatoes and served with yogurt on the side to offset the bitterness. Bitter melon fried in oil and then stuffed with other spicy ingredients is very popular in Andhra Pradesh, a south Indian state.

Bitter melon is rarely used in mainland Japan, but is a significant component of Okinawan cuisine.

In Vietnam, raw bitter melon slices consumed with dried meat floss and bitter melon soup with shrimp are popular dishes.

It is prepared into various dishes in the Philippines, where it is known as ampalaya. Ampalaya may also be stir-fried with ground beef and oyster sauce, or with eggs and diced tomato. A very popular dish from the Ilocos region of the Philippines, pinakbet, consists mainly of bitter melons, eggplant, okra, string beans, tomatoes, lima beans, and other various regional vegetables stewed with a little bagoong-based stock.

The young shoots and leaves may also be eaten as greens; in the Philippines, where bitter melon leaves are most commonly consumed, they are called dahon (leaves) ng ampalaya. The seeds can also be eaten, and give off a sweet taste, but have been known to cause vomiting and stomach upset.

Medicinal uses:
Bitter melons have been used in various Asian traditional medicine systems for a long time . Like most bitter-tasting foods, bitter melon stimulates digestion. While this can be helpful in people with sluggish digestion, dyspepsia, and constipation, it can sometimes make heartburn and ulcers worse. The fact that bitter melon is also a demulcent and at least mild inflammation modulator, however, means that it rarely does have these negative effects, based on clinical experience and traditional reports.

Perhaps the best substantiated use to date is that of bitter melon for people with diabetes mellitus. Several preliminary (non-randomized, non-blinded) clinical trials suggest this benefit, though controlled trials are necessary for confirmation . In the Philippines, bitter melon tea is used in blood sugar control for poor people as exemplified in the very successful Operation Diabetes . For a detailed review of studies involving bitter melon and diabetes, see Abascal and Yarnell 2005.

In ayurvedic medicine, bitter melon is popularly seen as a “plant-insulin.” It has been demonstrated that bitter melon contains a protein similar to bovine insulin, sometimes referred to as p-insulin or polypeptide-p (Baldwa, et al. 1977). When purified and injected subcutaneously into patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), it acted very similar to slow-acting animal insulins and was able to sustain patients . One child in this small study who previously had many side effects from bovine insulin was able to use p-insulin exclusively for 5 months with no sign of problems. This represents the potential for a vegetarian alternative to animal insulin for patients with IDDM, as well as a potentially more sustainable source of insulin, and should be further developed. It is not possible to substitute eating bitter melon for taking insulin.

Though it has been claimed that bitter melon’s bitterness comes from quinine, no evidence could be located supporting this claim. Bitter melon is traditionally regarded by Asians, as well as Panamanians and Colombians, as useful for preventing and treating malaria. Laboratory studies have confirmed that various species of bitter melon have anti-malarial activity, though human studies have not yet been published .

Laboratory tests suggest that compounds in bitter melon might be effective for treating HIV infection . As most compounds isolated from bitter melon that impact HIV have either been proteins or glycosproteins (lectins), neither of which are well-absorbed, it is unlikely that oral intake of bitter melon will slow HIV in infected people. It is possible oral ingestion of bitter melon could offest negative effects of anti-HIV drugs, if a test tube study can be shown to be true in people . In one preliminary clinical trial, an enema form of a bitter melon extract showed some benefits in people infected with HIV (Zhang 1992). Clearly more research is necessary before this could be recommended.

The other realm showing the most promise related to bitter melon is as an immunomodulator. One clinical trial found very limited evidence that bitter melon might improve immune cell function in people with cancer, but this needs to be verified and amplified in other research . If proven correct this is another way bitter melon could help people infected with HIV


How much bitter melon should I take?

For those who can withstand the bitter taste, many herbalists recommend eating one small melon; 100 millileters of a bitter melon decoction; or two ounces of fresh bitter melon juice per day. For people who cannot stand the taste, some practitioners recommend bitter melon tinctures (five millileters, two or three times per day).

What forms of bitter melon are available?

Fresh bitter melon and bitter melon juice can be found at many specialty stores and Asian markets. Bitter melon extracts and tinctures can be found at some health food stores.

What can happen if I take too much bitter melon? Are there any interactions I should be aware of? What precautions should I take?

Excessive amounts of bitter melon juice may cause abdominal pain and diarrhea. In addition, patients with hypoglycemia should avoid bitter melon, because it could theoretically worsen their condition.

At present, there are no well-known drug interactions with better melon. However, make sure to consult with a health care provider before taking bitter melon (or any other dietary supplement).

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Source:ChiroFind.com and  en.wikipedia.org

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