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Capparis Zeylanica

Botanical Name :Capparis Zeylanica
Family: Capparaceae
Genus: Capparis
Species: C. zeylanica
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Brassicales

Synonym : Capparis brevispina, Capparis horrida, Capparis zeylanica

Common Names:
*Bengali: Kalokera,Asarilata, Asaria, Kalokera, Kalukoan, Baganoi
*English: Ceylon Caper
*Gujarati: Kakhbilado, Govindakal, Karrallura
*Hindi :Ardanda, Jhiris
*Irula :Kevisi kodi
Kannada : Mullukattari
Konkani :Vaghamti
Malayalam: Elippayar, Karthotti, Gitoran
Marathi : Vaghanti,  Govindi,  Kaduvaghanti
Others Ban Kera, Garna, Govind-phal, Karwila, Wagati, Gitoran, Kaatu Thotti, Elippayar, Ceylon Caper, Karwilun
Rajasthani : Gitoranj
Sanskrit :Karambha, Tapasapriya, Vyaghra Nakhi
Tamil: Atandy, Suduthoratti, Ekkathari, Suduthorati, Karrotti, Atontai, Morandan
Telugu: Arudonda

Habitat : Native to India and China

Description:
Capparis zeylanica is a climbing shrub common in the forests of the Indian subcontinent and China.A rigid, climbing, much-branched shrub; young parts clothed with rufous tomentum. Leaves 2.5-7.5 cm long, elliptic, oblong, obtuse, acute or retuse; stipular spines hooked. Flowers supra-axillary, solitary or 2-3, one above the other in a vertical line, the upper the longest. Sepals 9 mm long, densely rufous-pubescent outside; petals twice as long as the sepals, densely villous. Fruit subglobose, 3.2 cm across. Methanolic extracts of the leaves have been shown to reduce diarrhea in mice. Many butterfly larva feed on its leaves.
click to see....>…..(01)...(1)……...(2).……...(3).……..(4)...

Botanical description:
Flower: In axillary clusters; stamens cream when anthesis, red to purple in the evening. Flowering from February-April.

Fruit: An ovoid berry, pendulous, smooth, pustulate; blood red when ripe; seeds many. Fruiting April onwards.

Leaf:

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate-spiral

Leaf Type: Simple

Leaf Shape : Ovate, elliptic or lanceolate

Leaf Apex: Obtuse-retuse or mucronate

Leaf Base: Cuneate-obtuse

Chemical Constituents:
Leaves and seeds contain thioglucosides, glucocapparin, n-tricontane, alpha-and bita-amyrin, an alkaloid, a phytosterol, a mucilaginous substance and a water-soluble acid, capric acid. The seeds contain fixed oil.

Medicinal Uses:
Root bark is sedative, cooling, cholagogue, stomachic and antihidrotic; along with spirit given in cholera. Leaves are used as a counter irritant and as a cataplasm in boils, swellings, piles and rheumatism. Flowers are used as laxative.
click to see..>1) :Antidiarrheal activity of Capparis zeylanica leaf extracts  :

2)    Research work

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capparis_zeylanica
http://www.mpbd.info/plants/capparis-zeylanica.php
http://indiabiodiversity.org/species/show/32086.

 

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Ranunculus ficaria

Botanical Name : Ranunculus ficaria
Family: Ranunculaceae
Genus: Ranunculus
Species: R. ficaria
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Ranunculales

Synonyms:   Ficaria grandiflora Robert, Ficaria verna Huds

Common Names :Lesser celandine

Habitat :Ranunculus ficaria is found throughout Europe and west Asia and is now introduced in North America. It prefers bare, damp ground and in the UK it is often a persistent garden weed. The flowers are orange, turning yellow as they age.

Description:
Ranunculus ficaria is a low-growing, hairless perennial plant, with fleshy dark green, heart-shaped leaves.It grows to  0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.2 m (0ft 8in) at a fast rate.It is not frost tender. It is in leaf 6-Jan It is in flower from Mar to May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, beetles.
CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires moist soil.

It exists in both diploid (2n=16) and tetraploid (2n=32) forms which are very similar in appearance. However, the tetraploid type prefer more shady locations and frequently develops bulbils at the base of the stalk. These two variants are sometimes referred to as distinct sub-species, R. ficaria ficaria and R. ficaria bulbifer respectively.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, celandine comes from the Latin chelidonia, meaning swallow: it was said that the flowers bloomed when the swallows returned and faded when they left. The name Ranunculus is Late Latin for “little frog,” from rana “frog” and a diminutive ending. This probably refers to many species being found near water, like frogs.

Cultivation:   
Prefers a moist loamy neutral to alkaline soil in full sun or shade[1, 238]. A very common and invasive weed[17, 90], especially when growing in the shade because this encourages formation of bulbils at the leaf bases[238]. You would regret introducing it into your garden, though it might have a place in the wild garden[90]. This is, however, a polymorphic species[90] and there are a number of named forms selected for their ornamental value[188]. These are normally less invasive than the type species. The plant flowers early in the year when there are few pollinating insects and so seed is not freely produced[4]. The plant, however, produced tubercles (small tubers) along the stems and each of these can grow into a new plant[4]. Grows well along woodland edges[24], and in the deeper shade of the woodland where it often forms dense carpets[4]. The flowers do not open in dull weather and even on sunny days do not open before about 9 o’clock in the morning and are closed by 5 o’clock in the evening[4]. A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes[54].

Propagation :  
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. This species doesn’t really need any help from us. Division in spring.

Edible Uses   :
Edible Parts: Leaves;  Root.

Young leaves in spring – raw or cooked as a potherb. The first leaves in spring make an excellent salad. The leaves, stalks and buds can be used like spinach, whilst the blanched stems are also eaten. The leaves turn poisonous as the fruit matures. Caution is advised regarding the use of this plant for food, see the notes above on toxicity. Bulbils – cooked and used as a vegetable. The bulbils are formed at the leaf axils and also at the roots.  Caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity. The flower buds make a good substitute for capers.

Medicinal Uses:
Astringent.

Lesser celandine has been used for thousands of years in the treatment of haemorrhoids and ulcers. It is not recommended for internal use because it contains several toxic components. The whole plant, including the roots, is astringent. It is harvested when flowering in March and April and dried for later use. It is widely used as a remedy for piles and is considered almost a specific. An infusion can be taken internally or it can be made into an ointment and used externally. It is also applied externally to perineal damage after childbirth. Some caution is advised because it can cause irritation to sensitive skins. Externally also used for perineal damage after childbirth.  Combines well with plantain, marigold for agrimony for the internal treatment of piles.

Other Uses :
Teeth.

The flower petals are an effective tooth cleaner.  The plant often forms dense carpets when grown in the shade and can therefore be used as a ground cover though they die down in early summer. This should be done with some caution, however, since the plant can easily become an unwanted and aggressive weed in the garden.

Known Hazards :  All parts of the plant are poisonous. The toxins are unstable and of low toxicity, they are easily destroyed by heat or by drying. The sap can cause irritation to the skin

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Ranunculus+ficaria
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesser_celandine

http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

Breadfruit

Botanical Name :Artocarpus altilis
Family: Moraceae
Tribe: Artocarpeae
Genus: Artocarpus
Species: A. altilis
Kingdom
: Plantae
Phylum: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Rosales

Scientific names : Artocarpus altilis Linn.,Artocarpus communis  ,Artocarpus incisus
Common names:Fruta de pan (Span.), Breadfruit (Engl.),Rimas (Tag.)

Habitat :Native to the Malay Peninsula, through all of Island Southeast Asia and into most Pacific Ocean islands. The ancestors of the Polynesians found the trees growing in the northwest New Guinea area around 3500 years ago. They gave up the rice cultivation they had brought with them from ancient Taiwan, and raised breadfruit wherever they went in the Pacific (except Easter Island and New Zealand which were too cold). Their ancient eastern Indonesian cousins spread the plant west and north through Insular and coastal Southeast Asia. It has, in historic times, also been widely planted in tropical regions elsewhere

Description:
Breadfruit trees grow to a height of 85 feet (26 m). The large and thick leaves are deeply cut into pinnate lobes. All parts of the tree yield latex, a milky juice, which is useful for boat caulking.
You may click to see the picture:->

The tree.

Artocarpus altilis (fruit).

ARS breadfruit49

Bread fruit in early stages.

Breadfruit drawing

Tree trunk

Fruit
The trees are monoecious, with male and female flowers growing on the same tree. The male flowers emerge first, followed shortly afterward by the female flowers, which grow into a capitulum, which are capable of pollination just three days later. The pollinators are Old World fruit bats in the family Pteropodidae. The compound, false fruit develops from the swollen perianth and originates from 1,500-2,000 flowers. These are visible on the skin of the fruit as hexagon-like disks.

Breadfruit is one of the highest-yielding food plants, with a single tree producing up to 200 or more fruits per season. In the South Pacific, the trees yield 50 to 150 fruits per year. In southern India, normal production is 150 to 200 fruits annually. Productivity varies between wet and dry areas. In the Caribbean, a conservative estimate is 25 fruits per tree. Studies in Barbados indicate a reasonable potential of 6.7 to 13.4 tons per acre (16-32 tons/ha). The grapefruit-sized ovoid fruit has a rough surface, and each fruit is divided into many achenes, each achene surrounded by a fleshy perianth and growing on a fleshy receptacle. Some selectively bred cultivars have seedless fruit.

The breadfruit is closely related to the breadnut and the jackfruit.

Cultivation:
Breadfruit is an equatorial lowland species that grows best below elevations of 650 metres (2,130 ft), but is found at elevations of 1,550 metres (5,090 ft). Its preferred rainfall is 1,500–3,000 millimetres (59–120 in) per year. Preferred soils are neutral to alkaline (pH of 6.1-7.4) and either sand, sandy loam, loam or sandy clay loam. Breadfruit is able to grow in coral sands and saline soils.

Edible uses:
Nutritional :Breadfruit is roughly 25% carbohydrates and 70% water. It has an average amount of vitamin C (20 mg/100g), small amounts of minerals (potassium and zinc) and thiamin (100 ?g).

*Crop considered a carbohydrate food source.
*Fruit can be fried, boiled, candied or cooked as a vegetable.
*High in starch, it is also high in Vitamin B, with fair amounts of B and C.

Breadfruit is a staple food in many tropical regions. They were propagated far outside their native range by Polynesian voyagers who transported root cuttings and air-layered plants over long ocean distances. They are very rich in starch, and before being eaten they are roasted, baked, fried or boiled. When cooked the taste is described as potato-like, or similar to fresh-baked bread (hence the name).

Because breadfruit trees usually produce large crops at certain times of the year, preservation of the harvested fruit is an issue. One traditional preservation technique is to bury peeled and washed fruits in a leaf-lined pit where they ferment over several weeks and produce a sour, sticky paste. So stored, the product may last a year or more, and some pits are reported to have produced edible contents more than 20 years later.  Fermented breadfruit mash goes by many names such as mahr, ma, masi, furo, and bwiru, among others.

Drawing of breadfruit by John Frederick MillerMost breadfruit varieties also produce a small number of fruits throughout the year, so fresh breadfruit is always available, but somewhat rare when not in season.

Breadfruit can be eaten once cooked, or can be further processed into a variety of other foods. A common product is a mixture of cooked or fermented breadfruit mash mixed with coconut milk and baked in banana leaves. Whole fruits can be cooked in an open fire, then cored and filled with other foods such as coconut milk, sugar and butter, cooked meats, or other fruits. The filled fruit can be further cooked so that the flavor of the filling permeates the flesh of the breadfruit.

The Hawaiian staple food called poi made of mashed taro root is easily substituted or augmented with mashed breadfruit. The resulting “breadfruit poi” is called poi ?ulu. In Puerto Rico, it is called “panapen” or “pana”, for short. Pana is often served boiled with a mixture of sauteed bacalao (salted cod fish), olive oil and onions. It is also serve as tostones or mofongo. In Dominican Republic, it is known by the name “buen pan” or “good bread”. Breadfruit is also found in Indonesia and Malaysia, where it is called ‘sukun’. In the South Indian state of Kerala and coastal Karnataka especially on the sides of Mangalore, where it is widely grown and cooked, it is known as Kadachakka and Gujje respectively. In Belize, the Mayan people call it ‘masapan’.

Medicinal Uses:
Parts used:Bark, leaves, fruit.

Properties and constituents : Study has yielded papayotin, enzyme and artocarpin.

Folkloric:
• Decoction of the bark used as vulnerary (wound healing). In the Visayas, decoction of the bark used in dysentery.
• Used as emollient.
• In the Carribean, leaves are used to relieve pain and inflammation.
• In Jamaican folk medicine, leaf decoction used for hypertension.

.It is also used in traditional medicine to treat illnesses that range from sore eyes to sciatica.

Studies:-
• Phytochemical: (1) Study concluded that the starch of Artocarpus altilis showed a high degree of purity. Physiochemical and rheological characteristics suggest the starch could be useful in products that require long heating process, with an excellent digestibility that might be advantageous for medical and food use. (2) Study showed percent recoveries of amino acid, fatty acid and carbohydrate content showed 72.5%, 68.2% and 81.4%. The starch content is 15.52 g/100 g fresh weight.
• Cytoprotective: Study yielded cytoprotective components – ß-sitosterol and six flavonoids with good potential for medicinal applications.
• Antiinflammatory: Extract of breadfruit leaves was shown to contain compounds with significant anti-inflammatory activities.
Phenolic Compounds / Cytotoxicity: Study isolated isoprenylated flavonoids – morusin, artonin E, cycloartobiloxanthone and artonol B – that showed high toxicity against Artmia salina. Result of cytotoxicity test showed the presence of an isoprenyl moiety in the C-3 position in the flavone skeleton, an important factor for its activity.
• Negative Inotropic Effect: Leaf extract study exerted a weak, negative chronotropic and inotropic effect in vivo in the rat. The mechanism of action of the inotropic agent was not cholinergic and may involve decoupling of excitation and contraxction.

Other Uses:
The wood of the breadfruit tree was one of the most valuable timbers in the construction of traditional houses in Samoan architecture.
Breadfruit was widely and diversely used among Pacific Islanders. Its lightweight wood (specific gravity of 0.27) is resistant to termites and shipworms, consequently used as timber for structures and outrigger canoes.  Native Hawaiians used its sticky sap to trap birds, whose feathers were made into cloaks.
Its wood pulp can also be used to make paper, called breadfruit tapa

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.stuartxchange.com/Rimas.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breadfruit

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Artabotrys hexapetalus (Bengali :kantali champa)

Botanical Name : Artabotrys hexapetalus
Family: Annonaceae
Genus: Artabotrys (ar-TAY-bot-riss) (Info)/Cananga
Species: hexapetalus/C. odorata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Magnoliales
Synonym:Artabotrys odoratissimus, Artabotrys uncinatus

Common Name :Harichampa, Madanmast, Katchampa, Climbing Ylang-Ylang, Lilo champo, Harachampa, Manoranjini, Manoranjitham, Hirvaa chaphaa, Harita champaka, Manoranjidam, Aakusampenga.

Vernacular Names:
Bengali: kantali champa,  kaanthaali chaanpaa • Burmese: kada ngan, padat ngan, tadaing hmwe • Chinese: ying zhao hua, ying zhao lan • English: bhandari vine (India), ilang ilang, tail grape, ylang ylang vine • French: coq du levant, coque du levant, ilang-ilang grimpant, liane ilang-ilang • Hawaiian: lanalana • Hindi:  hari champa, madanmast, madmanti*,  manorangini • Japanese: iraniran noki, tsuru iraniran • Kannada: kandaala sampige*, kandalisampage*, manoranjani hu balli*, manoranjini (manorangini), manoranjini hoovu • Malayalam: madanakameswari*, manoranjitam* • Manipuri: chini champa • Marathi: hirva champa, hirva chapa • Oriya: kalomuro • Portuguese: artabrotis trepador • Russian: artabotris,  ilang-ilang • Sanskrit: hara champa, harachampaka, madanah* • Tamil: akkurotam*, antakam*, kanankay*, kulakayam*, kunarancitam*, makaticam*, manoranjidam*, manorancitam*, manoranjitham*, matanakamappu* • Telugu: manoranjidamu*, manoranjitamu*, muddasampenga*, phala sampenga*, phalasampangi*, sakalaphala sampenga*, sakalaphalasampangi*, sampangipurugu*, tiga sampangi • Thai: karawek (Central Thailand), kradang nga chin, saban nga chin.

Habitat:Origin: Tropical Asia

Description;
A medium size vine 8 to 10′, producing flowers that are greenish in color and fade to yellow with age, and are extremely fragrant. When young, this climber grows just like a regular shrub but at 5-6 ft, will start to vine. It is not an aggressive vine.

You may click to see the pictures;.>…..(1)…….(2)…..;.(3)

Artabotrys are very interesting, medium sized vines from Asia. They are quite sturdy and easy to grow. Any location from full sun to filtered light would be good. Good drainage is important and the soil has to be moderately moist. Artabotrys are vines that can climb on a trellis fence or on top of other shrubs by special structures on the stems that resemble hooks. If left by themselves, the vine will grow on top of itself forming a mound.
Most people that expect large, colorful flowers will be disappointed with the Artabotrys. The flowers appear during the warmer months and are greenish/yellow and very often hidden by the leaves.
These beautiful vines with shiny green leaves are not really grown for the flowers. People like them for their the unusual fragrance. They are also called “juicy fruit vine.” Artabotrys are tropical vines and have to be protected against freezing temperatures. They can also be grown in containers with proper trimming and brought indoors during the cold spells.

Click to see :
Studies on the chemical constituents of the leaves from Artabotrys hexapetalus:

Medicinal Uses:
The oil from the flower is extensively used in aromatherapy.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
Artabotrys hexapetalus
http://www.mgonlinestore.com/YYVine/
http://www.rareflora.com/artabotryshex.html

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Alangium salvifolium

Botanical name : Alangium salvifolium Wang.

Family : Alangiaceae

SANSKRIT SYNONYMS :Ankolah, Kolakah, Rechi, Deerghakeelakah

PLANT NAME IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES:
Sanskrit Name : Ankota, Ankola, Dirghakila, Nikochaka
English :     Sage-leaved alangium
Hindi :     Angol,Dhera,
Malayalam    : Ankolam,Velithondi

Habitat :Medium sized tree with edible fleshy fruits. Fragrant while flowers. Grows in throughout dry parts of India.

Description:
A small, thorny deciduous tree/ shrub which grows   up to a height of 5-10 meters. Bark yellowish, leaves alternate, elliptical and usually unequal at the base; flowers-yellowish white, fragrant, in axillary fascicles,fruits 1-2 seeded,1cm in length,1-2 seeded berries crowned by the calyx lobes.

YOU MAY CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURE:

1. Tree

2.Leaf

3.Branch

 

click & see the pictures

Edible Uses:Fleshy fruits are eaten.

Medicinal Uses:
Useful part :    Seeds, Leaves, Root

AYURVEDIC PROPERTIES:-
Rasa    : Kashaya, Katu, Tikta,
Guna   : Lakhu, Snigda, Teekshna, Sara
Virya   : Ushna
Plant pacifies vitiated pitta. It is anti-hypertensive, antidote for several poisons especially for rabies. Roots are useful for external application in case of rheumatism and inflammation. Fruits are used in treatment of hemorrhages.

Used in the treatment of Urinary calculi,sinus and wounds.

Useful in conditions like poison, skin diseases, leprosy, inflammations, external and internal applica
tion in dog and rat bites.

Root-External application in rheumatism, leprosy and inflammation.Internal use in dog and rat bites
Fruits-Burning sensation, piles .Fruits of Ankola are sweet in taste, cool and purgative in action.

Therapeutic uses:-
•In Ayurveda, root bark is widely used as an antidote to all major poisons
•Ayurveda recommends root bark rubbed with rice water and mixed with honey for acute diarrhoea
•In Ayurveda, root bark rubbed with turmeric and applied externally in leprosy, syphilitic and other skin diseases. This formulation is a widely accepted one in Ayurveda
•Root infusion of Ankola is given internally in dog and rat bites. The same is also good for worms,colic pains, inflammations and poisonous bites including snake bites
•Oil extracted from the root is recommended for acute joint pain.

Pharmacognostic studies on Alangium salvifolium (linn.f.) wang. root bark:-
Root bark of Alangium salvifolium (Linn.f.) Wang. (Family Alangiaceae) is a reputed drug mentioned in the ancient books of Ayurveda and Siddha for the treatment of epilepsy, jaundice, hepatitis etc. Root bark of the plant was subjected to macro-microscopic, photomicrographic, physico-chemical, fluorescence, preliminary phytochemical, TLC and HPTLC to fix quality standards for this drug. Microscopic studies have shown stratified phellem, rhytidome, cluster crystals of calcium oxalate and uni- to triseriate medullary rays in the root bark. Chloroform, ethyl acetate, ethanol extracts and alkaloid fraction revealed characteristic chromatographic patterns with presence of alkaloids in varying concentrations. This study would be useful in the identification and authentication of the raw drug.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://ayurvedicmedicinalplants.com/plants/1272.html
http://www.divinewellness.com/ayurveda-Article/202/alangium-salvifolium.htm
http://parisaramahiti.kar.nic.in/Medicinal_plants_new/med%20plants/p8.html
http://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?family=Alangiaceae
http://www.phcogj.com/content/pharmacognostic-studies-alangium-salvifolium-linnf-wang-root-bark

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