Tag Archives: Epilepsy

How to stop being furiously angry

Isabel Clarke, a clinical psychologist who runs an anger-management clinic, explains why bad temper is a growing problem — and how to keep it in check.

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Imagine a pill you could take that instantly calms your temper when it’s about to burst into a Herculean mess. That’s what researchers might be on the brink of formulating after experiments helped them to identify the brain’s anger centre. Scientists at New York University found that chemical changes in the brain’s lateral septum made the mice attack other animals. It’s a discovery that could lead to a calming drug.

Meanwhile, we remain a nation of quiet seethers. Research by PruHealth found that nearly half of us admit to snapping at colleagues, 28 per cent to shouting at people at work and one in four to slamming down phones and banging fists on desks. On social media, it takes far less than a Katie Hopkins soundbite to enrage the digital British public into attack mode. But until the anger pill is a reality, our only option is self-management…

Why are we all so angry?
The more stress someone is under, the more likely they are to have an anger problem. Because we are working harder than ever, more chronically stressed people are presenting to their GPs and mental health clinics with anger issues.

Add to this, disinhibition — there is a greater level of acceptance of anger, swearing and even violent behaviour than there was 50 years ago — and the increased speed of our reactions, thanks to social media and email (as opposed to writing letters) and the root of our anger problem is clear.

Anger manifests itself in different ways. One person might turn their anger against themselves, which can manifest as depression, addiction or self-harm. Another might explode. But anger has a necessary function: to protect, by alerting us to threat and giving us the courage to meet challenges.

That “threat system” is part of our evolution and changes your body from a calm state into one that is ready to attack or run away. A shot of the stress hormone adrenaline is released, which leads to tense muscles, increased blood circulation, short breathing and alertness.

People who are under chronic stress exist in a constant state of attack mode, which can have a detrimental effect on their health. It is like driving in second gear on the motorway — you’re using the car’s resources to tackle a problem that isn’t there, which means that your car is likely to be damaged, burn out or even explode. The other problem is that the buzz from adrenaline can be addictive. Likewise, when a person gets what they want as a result of showing their anger, they can get caught in an anger trap, where outbursts seem like the only way to express their needs. So controlling excess anger is essential.

Look out for warning signs:….CLICK & SEE
Notice when your body is moving into threat mode — this might be during a conversation, while driving or when commuting — and pay attention to your early-warning signs of anger. Everyone’s signs will be different but they might include a tenseness across the shoulders or an uncomfortable feeling in the stomach. Ask yourself: What’s the matter? Then do something about it. This might be having a constructive conversation or using a simple breathing technique. For example, making your out breath longer than your in breath can be instantly relaxing. Paying attention to the physical reality around you and taking in the bigger picture, rather than the thoughts in your head, can also help. This allows you to instantly distance yourself from your own threat system and get the mental space to ask yourself whether you need to take some time out (see below).

Escape wind-up thinking:
The language we use in our thoughts and conversations can alert the body to a threat, priming it to react with anger. Characteristic wind-up thoughts include “shoulds”, “musts” or “oughts” as well as phrases beginning with “You never”, “You always” or “It’s not fair”. These are definite, accusatory and inflexible, and can keep you fixed in threat mode where you’re more likely to blow up. It can be hard to change your thought patterns. Instead, recognise wind-up thinking and acknowledge that it’s not in your best interest to continue it.

Object without losing it:
Angry people often try to project an attitude of “I’m cool, nothing gets to me”. As a result, they may allow resentments to build up until they eventually explode. Learning to communicate assertively is essential. The key is to state what you want firmly and calmly with words such as: “Excuse me, I can’t let this go.” It’s also important to put yourself in the other person’s shoes — this is something people with anger issues often have a hard time with, as they tend to be wound up in their own position.

Call time:
It can be difficult to have a constructive conversation if one or both parties have switched into attack mode. Take a couple having an argument. If one of them notices their own, or the other person’s, anger building up with physical signs, such as increased breathing and a raised voice, they might say they need to go out for a walk to clear their head. Often, this is the point where the other partner won’t let them, desperate to get one last point across. But it’s also the point where arguments can escalate to emotional or physical violence.

An expart councelor has worked with couples on negotiating this space and ensuring the other person respects it. Having such an agreement is essential for dealing with anger, especially at home. Don’t continue the discussion if you observe in someone’s behaviour or speech — or your own — that the body has gone into action mode. Take time out. Go for a walk outside, write in a journal or call a friend — set aside some alone time…...CLICK & SEE

Let go:
When your body is in threat mode, anything — from being told you might lose your job to someone jumping in front of you in a queue — can feel equally outrageous and worthy of an outburst. By taking a step back with the simple breathing practices mentioned above, you can see the bigger picture and work out whether it really is outrageous and worth fighting for. Ask yourself if it will matter in five minutes. If the answer is no, let it go.

Source: The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

Best way to get rid from sudden anger  is to practice Yoga  with  Medition & Pranayama.

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Pilonidal sinus

 

Alternative Names:pilonidal cyst, pilonidal abscess or sacrococcygeal fistula

Definition:
A pilonidal sinus is a dimple in the skin in the crease of your child’s buttocks.

This may be noted at birth as a depression or hairy dimple and be present for many years without any symptoms.
Pilonidal sinus affect men more often and most commonly occur in young adults.


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Two pilonidal cysts in the natal cleft
A pilonidal sinus may also occur due to a blockage in the hair follicles, often associated with an ingrown hair.
In both situations, hair acts as a foreign body, which may produce an infection. The infection may spread into the tissues of your child’s buttocks and produce an abscess (collection of pus under the skin) at a site several inches away from the sinus.

Pilonidal means “nest of hair”, and is derived from the Latin words for hair (“pilus”) and nest (“nidus”).The term was used by Herbert Mayo as early as 1830. R.M. Hodges was the first to use the phrase “pilonidal cyst” to describe the condition in 1880.

Symptoms:
A pilonidal sinus may cause no noticeable symptoms (asymptomatic). The only sign of its presence may be a small pit on the surface of the skin.

When it’s infected, a pilonidal sinus becomes a swollen mass (abscess). Signs and symptoms of an infected pilonidal cyst include:

*Pain
*Localized swelling
*Reddening of the skin
*Drainage of pus or blood from an opening in the skin (pilonidal sinus)
*Foul smell from draining pus

Hair protruding from a passage (tract) below the surface of the skin that connects the infected pilonidal cyst to the opening on the skin’s surface (a pilonidal sinus) — more than one sinus tract may form
Fever (uncommon)

Causes:
Quite why it happens isn’t entirely clear. When they occur in the cleft between the buttocks, one popular explanation is that there’s a developmental defect in the direction that the hair grows – that is, the hair grows inwards rather than outwards.

One proposed cause of pilonidal cysts is ingrown hair. Excessive sitting is thought to predispose people to the condition because they increase pressure on the coccyx region. Trauma is not believed to cause a pilonidal cyst; however, such an event may result in inflammation of an existing cyst. However there are cases where this can occur months after a localized injury to the area. Some researchers have proposed that pilonidal cysts may be the result of a congenital pilonidal dimple. Excessive sweating can also contribute to the cause of a pilonidal cyst.

The condition was widespread in the United States Army during World War II. More than eighty thousand soldiers having the condition required hospitalization.  It was termed “jeep seat or “Jeep riders’ disease”, because a large portion of people who were being hospitalized for it rode in jeeps, and prolonged rides in the bumpy vehicles were believed to have caused the condition due to irritation and pressure on the coccyx.

Risk Factors:
Certain factors can make you more susceptible to developing pilonidal cysts. These include:

*Obesity
*Inactive lifestyle
*Occupation or sports requiring prolonged sitting
*Excess body hair
*Stiff or coarse hair
*Poor hygiene
*Excess sweating

Complications:
If a chronically infected pilonidal cyst isn’t treated properly, there may be an increased risk of developing a type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

Differential diagnosis
A pilonidal sinus can resemble a dermoid cyst, a kind of teratoma (germ cell tumor). In particular, a pilonidal cyst in the gluteal cleft can resemble a sacrococcygeal teratoma. Correct diagnosis is important because all teratomas require complete surgical excision, if possible without any spillage, and consultation with an oncologist.

Treatment :
Treatment may include antibiotic therapy, hot compresses and application of depilatory creams.

In more severe cases, the cyst may need to be lanced or surgically excised (along with pilonidal sinus tracts). Post-surgical wound packing may be necessary, and packing typically must be replaced twice daily for 4 to 8 weeks. In some cases, one year may be required for complete granulation to occur. Sometimes the cyst is resolved via surgical marsupialization.

Surgeons can also excise the sinus and repair with a reconstructive flap technique, which is done under general anesthetic. This approach is mainly used for complicated or recurring pilonidal disease, leaves little scar tissue and flattens the region between the buttocks, reducing the risk of recurrence.

Picture of Pilonidal cyst two days after surgery.

A novel and less destructive treatment is scraping the tract out and filling it with fibrin glue. This has the advantage of causing much less pain than traditional surgical treatments and allowing return to normal activities after 1–2 days in most cases.

Pilonidal cysts recur and do so more frequently if the surgical wound is sutured in the midline, as opposed to away from the midline, which obliterates the natal cleft and removes the focus of shearing stress.

Prevention:
To prevent future pilonidal sinus from developing:

*Clean the area daily with glycerin soap, which tends to be less irritating. Rinse the area thoroughly to remove any soapy residue. Washing briskly with a washcloth helps keep the area free of hair accumulation.

*Keep the area clean and dry. Powders may help, but avoid using oils or herbal remedies.
Avoid sitting for long periods of time.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pilonidal_sinus
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/pilonidal-cyst/DS00747
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/pilonidalsinus.shtml
http://www.childrenshospital.org/az/Site923/mainpageS923P0.html

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Febrile convulsions

 

Alternative Names:Fever fit,Febrile seizure,Seizure – fever induced

Definition:
Febrile convulsions are seizures associated with a significant rise in body temperature that occur in a child with a high fever of over 39°C (102.2°F).  They most commonly occur in children between the ages of 6 months and 6 years and are twice as common in boys as in girls (Lissauer, Tom-Illustrated Book of Paediatrics 3rd Ed.).

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These most typically occur during the early stages of a viral infection such as a respiratory infection, while the temperature is rising rapidly.

Febrile convulsions can be frightening but they’re rarely serious,  as   these convulsions occur without any brain or spinal cord infection or other nervous system (neurologic) cause.

Three per cent of children have at least one febrile convulsion. There may be a genetic predisposition – up to 20 per cent of relatives will have a seizure disorder including febrile convulsions.

Types:
There are two types of febrile seizures.

*A simple febrile convulsion is one in which the seizure lasts less than 15 minutes (usually much less than this), does not recur in 24 hours, and involves the entire body (classically a generalized tonic-clonic seizure).

*A complex febrile convulsion is characterized by longer duration, recurrence, or focus on only part of the body.

The simpleconvulsion  represents the majority of cases and is considered to be less of a cause for concern than the complex.

Symptoms:-
Febrile convulsions may be as mild as the child’s eyes rolling or limbs stiffening. Often a fever triggers a full-blown convulsion that involves the whole body.

Febrile convulsions may begin with the sudden contraction of muscles on both sides of a child’s body — usually the muscles of the face, trunk, arms, and legs. The child may cry or moan from the force of the muscle contraction. The contraction continues for several seconds, or tens of seconds. The child will fall, if standing, and may pass urine.

The child may vomit or bite the tongue. Sometimes children do not breathe, and may begin to turn blue.

Finally, the contraction is broken by brief moments of relaxation. The child’s body begins to jerk rhythmically. The child does not respond to the parent’s voice.

The seizures are brief, usually lasting only a minute or two and never more than five minutes.  It is usually followed by a brief period of drowsiness or confusion. A complex febrile convulsion lasts longer than 15 minutes, is in just one part of the body, or occurs again during the same illness.

The child loses consciousness, becomes stiff, stops breathing for up to 30 seconds and loses control of their bladder or bowel, wetting or soiling themselves.

Febrile convulsions are different than tremors or disorientation that can also occur with fevers. The movements are the same as in a grand mal seizure.

This stops after a few minutes and the child regains consciousness. Following the seizure they fall into a deep sleep and are often confused or irritable when they finally wake.

Causes:
The convulsions occur because the electrical systems in the brain have not yet matured sufficiently to cope with the stress of a high temperature.

About 3 – 5% of otherwise healthy children between ages 9 months and 5 years will have a seizure caused by a fever. Toddlers are most commonly affected. Febrile seizures often run in families.

Most febrile seizures occur in the first 24 hours of an illness, and not necessarily when the fever is highest. The seizure is often the first sign of a fever or illness

Febrile seizures are usually triggered by fevers from:

•Ear infections
•Roseola infantum (a condition with fever and rash caused by several different viruses)
•Upper respiratory infections caused by a virus
Meningitis causes less than 0.1% of febrile seizures but should always be considered, especially in children less than 1 year old, or those who still look ill when the fever comes down.

A child is likely to have more than one febrile seizure if:

•There is a family history of febrile seizures
•The first seizure happened before age 12 months
•The seizure occurred with a fever below 102 degrees Fahrenheit

Complications:
In about 15 per cent of cases, the child will have another febrile convulsion during the same illness. They also have a one in three risk of a convulsion during a subsequent illness.

Onset before the age of one and a family history increase the risk of recurrent problems.

Most children grow out of febrile convulsions without coming to any harm. However, about one per cent of children do subsequently develop epilepsy (this is more likely if the child has a longer than normal convulsion, or recurrent seizures in the same illness). Talk to your doctor if you’re worried.

Diagnosis:
The health care provider may diagnose febrile seizure if the child has a grand mal seizure but does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). In infants and young children, it is important to rule out other causes of a first-time seizure, especially meningitis.

In a typical febrile seizure, the examination usually shows no abnormalities other than the illness causing the fever. Typically, the child will not need a full seizure workup, which includes an EEG, head CT, and lumbar puncture (spinal tap).

To avoid having to undergo a seizure workup:

•The child must be developmentally normal.
•The child must have had a generalized seizure, meaning that the seizure was in more than one part of the child’s body, and not confined to one part of the body.
•The seizure must not have lasted longer than 15 minutes.
•The child must not have had more than one febrile seizure in 24 hours.
•The child must have a normal neurologic exam performed by a health care provider.

Treatment:
During the seizure, leave your child on the floor.

•You may want to slide a blanket under the child if the floor is hard.
•Move him only if he is in a dangerous location.
•Remove objects that may injure him.
•Loosen any tight clothing, especially around the neck. If possible, open or remove clothes from the waist up.
•If he vomits, or if saliva and mucus build up in the mouth, turn him on his side or stomach. This is also important if it looks like the tongue is getting in the way of breathing.
Do NOT try to force anything into his mouth to prevent him from biting the tongue, as this increases the risk of injury. Do NOT try to restrain your child or try to stop the seizure movements.

Focus your attention on bringing the fever down:

•Insert an acetaminophen suppository (if you have some) into the child’s rectum.
•Do NOT try to give anything by mouth.
•Apply cool washcloths to the forehead and neck. Sponge the rest of the body with lukewarm (not cold) water. Cold water or alcohol may make the fever worse.
•After the seizure is over and your child is awake, give the normal dose of ibuprofen or acetaminophen.
After the seizure, the most important step is to identify the cause of the fever.

Prognosis:
The first febrile seizure is a frightening moment for parents. Most parents are afraid that their child will die or have brain damage. However, simple febrile seizures are harmless. There is no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, mental retardation, a decrease in IQ, or learning difficulties.

A small number of children who have had a febrile seizure do go on to develop epilepsy, but not because of the febrile seizures. Children who would develop epilepsy anyway will sometimes have their first seizures during fevers. These are usually prolonged, complex seizures.

Nervous system (neurologic) problems and a family history of epilepsy make it more likely that the child will develop epilepsy. The number of febrile seizures is not related to future epilepsy.

About a third of children who have had a febrile seizure will have another one with a fever. Of those who do have a second seizure, about half will have a third seizure. Few children have more than three febrile seizures in their lifetime.

Most children outgrow febrile convulsions by age 5.

Prevention:
Because  febrile convulsion  can be the first sign of illness, it is often not possible to prevent them. A febrile  convulsion does not mean that your child is not getting the proper care.

Occasionally, a health care provider will prescribe diazepam to prevent or treat febrile convulsions that occur more than once. However, no medication is completely effective in preventing febrile convulsions.

You may click to see:
MoonDragon’s Health & Wellness FEVER …

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/febrileconvulsions2.shtml
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000980.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Febrile_seizure

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/19076.htm

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Treatment of Fit


The child stared into space grimacing at bystanders. “Stop it,” said the mother, embarrassed by the responses her actions evoked. But the child ignored her, then blinked and followed her obediently. Nobody realised that the little girl had just suffered a fit of atypical epileptic seizure.

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In classical epilepsy, typically, there is a cry followed by rolling up of the eyes and uncontrolled repetitive thrashing of the arms and legs. It usually lasts a few minutes after which the person falls to the ground. There may be no recollection of the event later.

To the untutored bystander, it may appear that the person has lost control of his or her body and been possessed by some “demonic force”. This is why the illness is called epilepsy, from the Greek word “seized”. But epilepsy actually occurs because of sudden unregulated rapid electrical discharges in the brain. It has nothing to do with demons, and exorcism will not help.

All seizures are not the same. Only one half the body, or even just a part — like the arms or face — may be affected. The rapid movements may resemble an uncontrolled tic or twitch. A sudden temporary interruption in the electrical pathways may affect consciousness, awareness, movements or bodily posture. This can result in unfocused staring (absence attacks), or “feelings” of jamais vu (unreality) or déjà vu (familiarity), or disturbances in vision, hearing and balance. In children, the seizures may be even more atypical. The child may just stare inattentively and blankly for a few minutes, suddenly fall forward, or start nodding.

About 2 per cent of adults have a seizure at some time in their life. Often, it is a one-off occurrence. Children are more prone to seizures, particularly when the temperature rises. Such “febrile seizures” occur during an episode of fever, in 3 to 4 per cent of otherwise normal children from the age of nine months to five years. This may recur three or four times during subsequent episodes of fever.

A person is labelled as suffering from a seizure disorder or is an “epileptic” if there have been two or more episodes in the preceding six months, without an obvious precipitating cause. Seizures can occur if:

There is a genetic predisposition (around 30 per cent of epileptics have a close relative with seizures)

The brain structure is abnormal, producing alterations in the electrical pathway. These may be developmental or acquired as a result of trauma or surgery

The person has infections of the brain like encephalitis, meningitis or abscess

There are brain tumours

There is excessive alcohol consumption or sudden withdrawal

The person uses illegal recreational drugs

There are biochemical abnormalities like low blood sugars and other metabolic or electrolyte imbalances

There are disturbances in the blood supply to the brain.

The condition may also be precipitated by physical factors such as flickering lights, sleep deprivation or music.

Seizures are investigated with blood tests, electroencephalogram (EEG), computed tomography (CT) scan and / or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Seizure disorders require regular treatment with medications. These have negligible side effects and most can be taken safely during pregnancy as well. With the patient’s compliance, and correct and adequate medication, seizures are well controlled in 75 per cent of sufferers.

After regular treatment for three to five years, the medications are usually tapered off under supervision. Medication should never be abruptly discontinued or doses missed.

People with seizures can lead normal lives. Their academic performance need not suffer if the disease is managed well. However, driving, operating heavy machinery or working in areas with loud music or flickering lights should be avoided.

In women with epilepsy, fluctuating levels of natural hormones during the course of a normal menstrual cycle can cause an increase in the incidence and frequency of epileptic attacks premenstrually. Fertility is not affected by seizures.

Seizure medications (with the exception of sodium valporate) reduce the efficacy of oral contraceptives. Women with epilepsy who wish to practise contraception need a combination pill containing at least 50 mg of oestrogen. But instead of these higher dose pills, barrier contraception — such as condoms and diaphragms, or an IUCD (intra uterine contraceptive device like copper T) — may be a better option.

During pregnancy, good seizure control should be achieved for the safety of both the baby and mother. The overall risk of birth defects in epileptic women is around 7 per cent as against 3 per cent in the general population. If a woman is planning to become pregnant, she should immediately start folic acid supplements (5mg a day). Folic acid has a protective effect on the baby’s brain and spinal cord development in the first 40 days after conception.

Epilepsy is not a contraindication to breast-feeding, although small amounts of medication do cross over to breast milk. Epileptics can lead normal and productive lives if the condition is adequately controlled with proper medication.

Source:This article is written by Gita Mathai & published in the Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

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Nut Grass (Cyperus Rotundus Linn)

Botanical Name : cyperus rotundus Linn
Family Name: Cyperaceae
Vernacular Name: Sans– Musta ,Hind – Nagarmota , Eng – Nut grass
Common Name:mustaka
Habitat :It grows throughout India.
Parts used: tubers & rutes
Description:It is a pestiferous perennial weed with dark green glabrous culms, arising from a system of underground tubers.The plant has an elaborate underground system consisting of tubers,rhizomes and roots. The tubes are white and succulent when young and hard and black when mature.

CLICK TO SEE THE PICTURES..>….(01)…...(1).....(2).....(3)..…..(4)..
Main Constituents:Cyperine is the major constituent in the plant.

Medicinal Properties:Rhizome of the plant is used in various Ayurvedic preparations. Mustaka is widely used in Ayurveda to treat diseases of nervous system where stimulation is required. It helps in indigestion, excessive thirst, cough, cold, epilepsy and urinary disorders. Nagarmotha is found to be effective for menstrual disorders, skin troubles, general debility, sun stroke, fever and diseases of female reproductive organs. Topical application of lepa (Poultice or paste) of it stimulates milk secretion in lactating mothers and improves size of breast in undersized females.

Properties and uses:
The tubers are bitter, acrid, astringent, cooling, anti-inflammatory, revulsive, galactagogue, depurative, intellect promoting, nervine tonic, digestive, carminative, anthelmintic, stomachic. constipating, diuretic, lithontriptic, expectorant, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, vulnerary, febrifuge, antiperiodic and tonic, and are useful in vitiated conditions of kapha and pitta, hyperdipsia, inflammations, agalactia, leprosy, skin diseases, scabies, erysipelas, pruritus, amentia, neurasthenia, epilepsy, anorexia, dyspepsia, flatulence. colic, verminosis, diarrhoea, dysentery, strangury, renal and  vescical calculi, cough, bronchitis, amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea, wounds, ulcers, fever, intermittent and malarial fevers, vomiting, ophthalmia and general debility.

The root is pungent, acrid, cooling; astringent, bitter, appetiser, stomachic, anthelmintic; useful in leprosy, thirst, fever, blood diseases, biliousness, dysentery, pruritus, pain, vomiting, epilepsy,ophthalmia- erysipelas

The root is diuretic, emmenagogue, diaphoretic, anthelmintic, vulnerary; useful for ulcers and sores, fevers, dyspepsia,. urinary concretions

The roots are commonly used as a diaphoretic and astringent.

They are also credited with stimulant and diuretic properties. They are held in great esteem as a cure for disorders of the stomach and irritation of the bowels. the roots are used in fever

The bulbous roots are scraped and pounded with green ginger, and in this form, mixed with honey, they are given in cases of dysentery in doses of about a scruple. They are used too as an anthelmintic.

The fresh tubers are applied to the breast as a galactagogue..

A decoction of the tubers is given in fever, diarrhoea, dyspepsia, and stomach complaints.

The root is considered diuretic’ and antiperiodic, small tubers act on the lungs an liver. Their general action is tonic, stimulating, and stomachic.

Effect on Dosha:Pacifies Kapha and Pitta.
Main Classical Uses:Mustadi Kwath, Mustakarishta, Mustadi churan, Mustadi leha,Shadangapaniya.

Click to see:->The Cyperus Rotundus a Herb That makes grow Hair –

->Wound healing activity of cyperus rotundus linn.

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.incredibleayurveda.com/herbs.aspx?id=24
http://www.himalayahealthcare.com/herbfinder/h_cyperus.htm
http://www.ayurvedakalamandiram.com/herbs.htm#madayantika

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