Tag Archives: Glaucoma

Green Tea Could Reduce Glaucoma Risk

Catechins in green tea could help protect you against   glucoma and other eye diseases. New research finds that the ingredients travel from your digestive system into the tissues of your eyes.

Scientists analyzed eye tissue from rats that drank green tea. They found that eye tissues such as the lens and retina had absorbed green tea catechins.

According to NutraIngredients:

“The [study’s] authors said that oxidative stress causes biological disturbances such as DNA damage and activation of proteolytic enzymes that can lead to tissue cell damage or dysfunction and eventually many ophthalmic diseases.”

Resources:
NutraIngredients April 26, 2010

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry February 10, 2010;58(3):1523-34

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Green Tea Helps Fight Eye Diseases

Scientists have discovered that green tea can help prevent glaucoma and other eye diseases.

…...CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

They have found that the healthful substances found in green tea — renowned for their powerful antioxidant and disease-fighting properties — do penetrate into tissues of the eye.

The new study has documented how the lens, retina, and other eye tissues absorb these substances.

Chi Pui Pang and colleagues pointed out that so-called green tea ‘catechins’ have been among a number of antioxidants thought capable of protecting the eye.

Those include vitamin C, vitamin E, lutein, and zeaxanthin. Until now, however, nobody knew if the catechins in green tea actually passed from the stomach and gastrointestinal tract into the tissues of the eye.

The researchers resolved that uncertainty in experiments with laboratory rats that drank green tea. Analysis of eye tissues showed beyond a doubt that eye structures absorbed significant amounts of individual catechins.

The retina, for example, absorbed the highest levels of gallocatechin, while the aqueous humor tended to absorb epigallocatechin. The effects of green tea catechins in reducing harmful oxidative stress in the eye lasted for up to 20 hours.

“Our results indicate that green tea consumption could benefit the eye against oxidative stress,” the study concluded.

The study appears in ACS’ bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Source :
BBC NEWS

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FDA Warns About Eyelash Thickener Claims

The U.S. FDA has warned Allergan Inc. that the Web site for its eyelash thickener Latisse is misleading. The site downplays or fails to mention risks associated with the product.

…..eyelashes…..eyelashes..…….
The Latisse site either doesn’t mention potential side effects including bacterial eye infections, allergic reactions, excess hair growth outside the intended treatment area, and permanent changes in iris and eyelid pigmentation, or presents them in very small text.

The drug is approved to make eyelashes thicker, fuller and darker. Latisse, or bimatoprost, was already on the market as a treatment for glaucoma.

Source: MSNBC September 17, 2009

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Haliotidis (Abalone Shell)

Latin Plant Name: Concha Haliotidis
Pinyin Mandarin Name: Shi Jue Ming

Common English Name: Abalone Shell

Chinese Name:Shi jue ming

Part of Plant Used: Whole shell

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES
Properties: Salty in flavour, cold in nature, it acts on liver channel. It is effective for nourishing Yin and checking exuberance of yang, clearing away the from the liver to improve vision, relieving dizziness due to liver-yang and conjunctival congestion due to liver-heat.
Origin: It is the shell of Halio tis diversicolor Reeve, H. gigantea discus Reeve and H.ovina Chemnitz, family Halio tidae.

Property, taste and attributive meridian.
Salty in taste, cold in property. Enters the liver meridian.
Effects: Calming the liver-yang and checking exuberance of Yang, clearing away heat from the liver to improve vision.

General Usage: To be decocted before adding other ingredients.
Meridians Entered: Liver, Kidneys

Common Medicinal  Usages:
Action:
To subdue hyperactivity of the liver, quench its fire and improve eyesight.

Indications: Headache and dizziness; blurred vision due to nebula, optic atrophy and night blindness.

This herb is used in formulas to treat high blood pressure, eye redness with light sensitivity, blurred vision, glaucoma, cataracts, headaches behind eyes, and spasms (TCM: Liver imbalances with heat symptoms).

Traditional Usages and Functions:
Quells fire and causes Yang to descend; brightens eyes and causes superficial visual obstructions to recede.

Common Formulas Used In : Rehmannia and Dogwood Fruit.
Processing : Required

Cautions in Use; Do not use during pregnancy. Not useful in most cases where there are no heat symptoms.

Click to see ->:Concha Haliotidis (Shi Jue Ming) – Improves Eyesight

Resources:
http://www.acupuncture-and-chinese-medicine.com/haliotidis.html
http://www.fzrm.com/plantextracts/sea-ear_shell_extract.htm
http://www.tcmtreatment.com/herbs/0-shijueming.htm

http://www.enwei.com.cn/b2b_en/page.asp?title=shijueming

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Tonometry

Alternative Names:Intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement; Glaucoma test
Definition:
Tonometry is the measurement of tension or pressure  in your eyeball. High pressure inside the eye is caused by a disease called glaucoma, which can damage your vision if it is not treated. It is recommended that all adults over age 40 have their eye pressures measured every three to five years to check for glaucoma.Because People over age 40, especially African-Americans, are at the highest risk for developing glaucoma. Regular eye exams can help detect glaucoma early, when it can usually be treated.

A tonometer is an instrument for measuring tension or pressure ……..CLICK & SEE

In ophthalmology, tonometry is the procedure eye care professionals perform to determine the intraocular pressure (IOP), the fluid pressure inside the eye. It is an important test in the evaluation of ocular conditions such as glaucoma as well as conditions such as phthisis bulbi, and iritis. Most tonometers are calibrated to measure pressure in mmHg.
How do you prepare for the test?
Remove any contact lenses before the examination.The dye can permanently stain contact lenses.  Inform the health care provider if you have corneal ulcers and infections, an eye infection, if you are taking any drugs, or if you have a history of glaucoma in your family or other type of eye problem.
What happens when the test is performed and how it is done?
The pressure inside your eye is always measured from the outside. In most cases, if you are at an eye clinic, the pressure can even be measured without anything actually touching your eye. The eye doctor has you look up close at an instrument that blows a small puff of air onto your eye. It then uses a special sensor (like a tiny radar detector) to detect the amount of indentation that the air puff causes on the surface of the eye. This indentation is normal and lasts for only a fraction of a second.

Sometimes patients need to have their eye pressure measured but they are not in an eye clinic with this type of machine (for example, some patients need to be checked for glaucoma in an emergency room). In this case, the pressure can be measured with an instrument resembling a pen. One end of the instrument is placed on the surface of the eyeball. This feels like having a contact lens put in your eye.

There are several methods of testing for glaucoma.

The applanation method measures the force required to flatten a certain area of the cornea. A fine strip of paper stained with orange dye is touched to the side of the eye. The dye stains the front of the eye to help with the examination, then rinses out with tears. An anesthetic drop is also placed in the eye.

The slit-lamp is placed in front of you and you rest your chin and forehead on a support that keeps your head steady. The lamp is moved forward until the tonometer touches the cornea. The light is usually a blue circle. The health care provider looks through the eyepiece on the lamp and adjusts the tension on the tonometer. There is no discomfort associated with the test.

A slightly different method of applanation uses an object similar to pencil. Again, you are given numbing eye drops to prevent any discomfort. The device touches the outside of the eye and instantly records eye pressure.

The last method is the noncontact method (air puff). In this method, your chin rests on a padded stand. You stare straight into the examining device. The eye doctor shines a bright light into your eye to properly line up the instrument, and then delivers a brief puff of air at your eye. The machine measures eye pressure by looking at how the light reflections change as the air hits the eye.

Must you do anything special after the test is over?
Nothing.
How the Test Will Feel?
If numbing eye drops were used, you should not have any pain. In the noncontact method, you may feel mild pressure on your eye.

What risks are there from the test?
The test might make you feel like blinking, but it does not cause any pain. There are no risks from this test.If the applanation method is used, there is a small chance the cornea may be scratched (corneal abrasion). This will normally heal itself within a few days.

How long is it before the result of the test is known?
You can know the result of the test right away.

Results:

Normal Results

The eye pressure is within the normal range.

Normal eye pressure range is 10 – 21 mm Hg.

What Abnormal Results Mean?

Glaucoma may be detected.

Additional conditions under which the test may be performed:

Hyphema
*Trauma to the eye or head
*Before and after eye surgery

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonometry
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diagnostic-tests/tonometry.htm
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003447.htm

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