Tag Archives: New York Times

Will Sleeping on Your Side Reduce Snoring?

Snorers are often told to sleep on their sides rather than on their backs. This is because if you are lying on your side, the base of your tongue will not collapse into the back of your throat, obstructing breathing.
…...CLICK & SEE
However, for some snorers, changing sleep position may not make a difference. There are two types of snorers — those who snore when sleeping on their backs, and those who snore in every position.

According to the New York Times:
“… [W]eight plays a major role. In one large study, published in 1997, patients who snored or had breathing abnormalities only while sleeping on their backs were typically thinner, while their nonpositional counterparts usually were heavier … But that study also found that patients who were overweight saw reductions in the severity of their apnea when they lost weight.”

THE BOTTOM LINE :Sleeping on your side can help reduce snoring, though in people who are overweight, it may not make much difference without weight loss.

Resources:
*New York Times April 18, 2011
*Harefuah May 2009; 148(5):304-9, 351, 350
*Chest September 1997; 112(3):629-39

*http://healthmad.com/health/best-ways-that-will-help-you-stop-snoring-3-very-effective-ways/

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Study Finds Troubles With Gastric Band Surgery

A study has found that nearly half of a group of patients who received gastric band surgery for weight loss over ten years ago had the bands removed because of medical complications.

click & see

The study is the first to track laparoscopic gastric band surgery outcomes over a long period. The bands eroded in almost a third of the patients, and sixty percent went on to undergo additional weight loss surgery in spite of the bands.

According to the New York Times:
“Researchers concluded that the adjustable gastric band surgery, which is growing in popularity in the United States, ‘appears to result in relatively poor long-term outcomes.’ The results ‘are worse than we expected,’ said Dr. Jacques Himpens … lead author of the new study.”

Furthermore, significant bone loss has been shown to occur in teens receiving gastric bypass surgery, the same result that occurs in adults receiving this more invasive type of stomach surgery. Researchers took bone density measurements every three months for two years after the teen’s surgeries and according to USA Today found that:

“Two years after the surgery, the bone mineral content of the 61 obese teens studied had declined, on average, by 7.4 percent.”

Resources:
New York Times March 24, 2011
Archives of Surgery
USA Today April, 2011
Pediatrics March 28, 2011

Posted By Dr. Mercola | April 15 2011

Enhanced by Zemanta