Tag Archives: Salt

Exclusive salts for your meals

1. The Himalayan Pink Salt ………This salt with its salmon pink colour is extremely beautiful. Mined in the foothills of the Himalayan mountain range, this salt comes in large chunks just like rock salt and can make any food flavourful……CLICK & SEE

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2.The Hawaiian Black Lava Salt………. This is another variety of salt which is mixed with volcanic charcoal and that is how it gets its black colour. This salt has the capacity to turn any dish tasty. Mix it when you are making salads so that it looks dramatic…..CLICK & SEE

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3.The Indian Black Mineral Salt…….. Unlike the Hawaiian Black Lava Salt, this salt borders on the same colour but is greyer. This salt has a mineral or sulfur taste to it and is ideal for making soups, salads and sauces….....CLICK & SEE

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4.The Australian Murray River Salt……….. Unlike popular belief, not all salts come from the ocean. One of the popular varieties of river salt is the Australian Murray River Salt. This salt has a very mild flavour and is mostly used in salads.....CLICK & SEE

5.Bamboo Roasted Sea Salt ………A popular method of using salt in Korea, this salt is made by stuffing it into bamboo shoots and heating it. You can use this in any gravy dish that you prepare or you can also make dry dishes using this salt…..CLICK & SEE

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CLICK & SEE>…….Health Benefit of Rock Salt:

CLICK  & SEE..>.. Kala Namak(Bengali Bit Nun)

KALA NAMAK (BIT NUN) IS GOOD FOR HEALTH…… IT DOES NOT INCREASE SODIUM CONTENT OF BLOOD

Resources: The Times Of Indi

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Some Health Quaries & Answers

Ouch! My back hurts:

Q: I am 69 years old and have a pain in my lower back which, when I stand, radiates down both my legs. I am a housewife and the pain makes it very difficult for me to do housework. The orthopaedic I consulted said I have spondylolisthesis but none of the tablets I was prescribed seem to work.


A: Spondylolisthesis can be congenital but usually, especially if it occurs after the age of 50, is due to degeneration of the spinal vertebrae. One vertebra then tends to slip over the other and presses on the nerves (in your case the ones going to the legs) causing the pain.

This condition can usually be managed without surgery. A few days of bed rest should be followed by physiotherapy, concentrating on exercises that help with flexion of the spine and strengthening of the “core” muscles. You should also walk or take up a similar aerobic activity for 40 minutes every day. A lumbosacral brace should be worn at all times, except when lying down or exercising. If you are overweight, you will need to reduce.

Warts and all:

Q: I have had a wart on my finger for some time. Now another one has appeared near it. Both have a repulsive cauliflower like appearance.


A: Warts are a viral infection spread by contact from person to person. They are more likely to occur in children and young adults. They are harmless and not cancerous. They usually disappear on their own without treatment in six months to two years.

Dermatologists also remove them with cryotherapy (freezing), laser and cauterisation. Sometimes they may advise repeated application of medication.

Tread right:

Q: I want to buy a treadmill but do not know how effective exercise on it will be. Also I do not know what type of treadmill to buy.


A: Manual treadmills do not use a motor and move only when the person moves. Electric treadmills use a conveyor belt and motor. There is no wind resistance in a treadmill so unless the incline of the platform is set at 1 per cent, the calorie consumption is 10-15 per cent less than running the same distance on the road. The gait on the treadmill is also more bouncy because of the platform. This leads to bad running form and difficulty when returning to running on the road. Using the treadmill also tends to get repetitive and monotonous so that more mental effort is needed to persist. In short treadmill is expensive, occupies space and is less efficient and interesting than running on the road.

Life after work :

Q: I looked forward to retiring for 30 years, but once I did retire, I feel more stressed and depressed. My wife, who is a housewife, seems to have more to do than me. Also she is stressed because I am around all the time and in her way.

A: The retirement age in India is 58-60 and that is really too early! Most people are healthy, active and still in their prime. If you just sit around the house watching television, eating and sleeping, you will soon deteriorate mentally and physically. To ward this off, try getting a part-time job, starting a small business, joining socially relevant political peoples movements or doing volunteer work. You will feel needed and everyone (including your wife) will be happy.

Salt control :

Q: I have high blood pressure and am on enalapril to control it. My doctor told me to “control salt intake” but was not very specific about how exactly that is done. What should I do?

A: You need around 2.5gm (half a teaspoon) of salt a day if you are less than 50 years old and 1.5gm (quarter teaspoon) if older. This includes hidden salt intake from pickles, pappads, chips and other salty snacks. A rule of thumb is to take half a teaspoon of salt per day per person in the household and use it for cooking. People in the family who do not have high blood pressure can add extra salt if needed.

Down at heel :

Q: A severe pain shoots up my leg whenever I put my foot down in the morning. The doctor took an X-ray and said I have a calcaneal spur. He said I need surgery but I am not really willing to go for it. Is there any other remedy?


A: A calcaneal spur is an extra growth of bone under the heel. It can cause agonising pain. Before you consider surgery, try a few simple measures.

Soak your feet in salted hot water morning and evening. Rock your feet gently in the water.

• Always wear soft footwear. Do not go bare foot even in the house.

• Go to a physiotherapy centre. Ultrasound treatment often helps.

Lose weight if you are obese.

Light therapy:

Q: What should you do if an insect enters your ear?


A: Immediately place your ear near a bright light and turn off all other lights. The insect will usually fly back out again.

Source: The Telegraph ( Kolkata, India)

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Call for Mandatory Salt Curbs

Forcing food manufacturers to cut salt levels in processed food could help cut heart disease rates, claim Australian researchers.

A high salt food is bad for health

A theoretical study suggests mandatory salt limits could help reduce heart disease rates by 18% – far more than by using existing voluntary measures.

High-salt diets are linked to high blood pressure, which can lead to heart attacks or strokes.

Adults are advised to consume a maximum of 6g of salt a day – about a teaspoon.

The study looked at the effectiveness of different strategies around the world for reducing salt in processed foods.

Many countries, including Finland, the US, the UK, Canada, France, Australia and New Zealand, have adopted salt reduction programmes based on food labelling and voluntary cuts.

Australia uses a “Tick” programme, where food manufacturers can use a health promotion logo on packaging if they volunteer to cut salt content.

The team calculated that voluntary use of the logo could reduce heart disease rates in Australia by almost 1% – more than twice that of dietary advice alone.

But if all manufacturers were made to use the logo, the health benefits could be 20 times greater, they predict.

“If corporate responsibility fails, maybe there is an ethical justification for government to step in and legislate,” the authors, led by Linda Cobiac, of the University of Queensland, write in the journal Heart.

A UK heart charity said voluntary measures placed on food companies in the UK had made a difference but more could be done.

Victoria Taylor, senior heart health dietician at the British Heart Foundation, said: “We’re making progress without the need for compulsory limits and as a result we’ve seen a reduction in salt intake.

“But as three quarters of the salt we eat is already in the food we buy, we need to build on this work and watch carefully to make sure the food industry doesn’t slip back into old habits.”

Katharine Jenner of Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH) said the UK had pioneered a voluntary approach where all food sectors reduce the amount of salt they put in food.

“This cost-effective approach has been very successful and has already led to population average salt intakes falling by 10%,” she said.

Source
:BBC News

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Eating Nuts Can Lower Cholesterol, Say Experts

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Eating nuts may help lower cholesterol levels, US research suggests.
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The review of 25 studies, involving nearly 600 people, showed eating on average 67g of nuts – a small bag – a day reduced cholesterol levels by 7.4%.

The US Loma Linda University team believes nuts may help prevent the absorption of cholesterol.

UK experts said the research showed nuts were an important part of a healthy diet, but warned against eating nuts covered in sugar or salt.

Previous work has indicated eating nuts regularly is beneficial, but the Archives of Internal Medicine study set out to put an accurate figure on the effect.

“The effects of nut consumption were dose related, and different types of nuts had similar effects”...SAYS  Lead researcher Joan Sabate
The people involved ate 67g of nuts a day on average, over a period of three to eight weeks.

The people involved ate 67g of nuts a day on average, over a period of three to eight weeks.

As well as improving cholesterol levels, it also reduced the amount of triglyceride, a type of blood fat that has been linked to heart disease.

However, the impact was least pronounced among the overweight.

It is not yet clear why nuts have this effect, although one suggestion is that it is down to the plant sterols they contain, which are thought to interfere with cholesterol absorption.

Lead researcher Joan Sabate said increasing nut consumption as part of a healthy diet should be recommended.

He added: “The effects of nut consumption were dose related, and different types of nuts had similar effects.”

Ellen Mason, senior cardiac nurse at the British Heart Foundation, agreed, but she urged people to go for unsalted nuts.

“Apart from salted peanuts at the pub, nuts in sugary cereals or the traditional Christmas selection, nuts have been largely lacking in our diets in the UK,” she added.

The study was carried out by independent researchers, although it was partly funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation.

Source : BBC NEWS :May 10,2010

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Salt May Improve Your Mood

 

Many people consume too much salt, but new research may have uncovered one reason people crave it — it might lead to a better mood.

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Researchers found that when rats are deficient in sodium chloride (common table salt), they shy away from activities they normally enjoy. A loss of pleasure in normally pleasing actitvities is one of the most important features of psychological depression.

If salt is a natural mood-elevating substance, it could help explain why so many are tempted to over-ingest it, even though it’s known to contribute to high blood pressure, heart disease and other health problems.

Resources :
Science Blog March 10, 2009
Physiology & Behavior August 6, 2009; 94(5):709-21