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Claytonia virginica

Botanical Name: Claytonia virginica
Family: Montiaceae
Genus: Claytonia
Species:C. virginica
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales

Synonyms: Claytonia grandiflora.

Common Names: Virginia springbeauty, Eastern spring beauty, or Fairy spud,Spring Beauty, Hammond’s claytonia, Yellow Virginia springbeauty

Habitat:
Claytonia virginica is native to Eastern N. America – Quebec to Texas. A garden escape, locally naturalized in Britain. It grows in rich woods, thickets and clearings. Wetlands, seeps, moist woods, riparian hardwood forests, copses, bluffs, ravines and prairies from sea level to 1000 metres.

Description:
Claytonia virginica is a perennial plant, overwintering through a corm. It is a trailing plant growing to 5–40 cm long. The leaves are slender lanceolate, 3–14 cm long and 0.5–1.3 cm broad, with a 6–20 cm long petiole.

The flowers are 0.7–1.4 cm diameter with five pale pink or white (rarely yellow) petals, and reflect UV light. It has a raceme inflorescence, in which its flowers branch off of the shoot. The individual flowers bloom for three days, although the five stamens on each flower are only active for a single day. Flowering occurs between March and May depending on part of its range and weather. The seeds are between 0.2-0.3 cm in diameter and a shiny black. The seeds are released from the capsule fruit when it breaks open. Elaiosomes are present on the seeds and allow for ant dispersal.

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It is also a polyploid, having 2n between 12 and 191 chromosomes. The largest number of chromosomes was observed in New York City.

It is in flower from Mar to April, and the seeds ripen in May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland). It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
Landscape Uses:Rock garden, Woodland garden. Prefers a damp peaty soil and a position in full sun. Another report says that it requires some shade[188]. Requires a lime-free soil. Special Features:North American native, Naturalizing, Wetlands plant.

Propagation:
Seed – surface sow on a peat based compost in spring in a cold frame. Germination usually takes place within 2 – 4 weeks at 10°c. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the cold frame for at least their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer after the last expected frosts. Division of offsets in spring or autumn.

Edible Uses:
Root – raw or cooked. Rich in starch, it has a pleasant nutty flavour. A radish-like flavour when raw, it tastes like a cross between a potato and a chestnut when cooked. The root is rich in vitamins A and C. The globose tuber is up to 20cm in diameter.Algonquin people cooked them like potatoes. Spring beauty corms along with the entire above ground portion of the plant are safe for human consumption. Leaves and flowering stems – raw or cooked. Added to salads or used as greens. The leaves are often available in the winter.

Medicinal Uses:
This plant has been used medicinally by the Iroquois, who would give a cold infusion or decoction of the powdered roots to children suffering from convulsions. They would also eat the raw roots, believing that they permanently prevented conception.A cold infusion or decoction of the powdered roots has been given to children with convulsions.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claytonia_virginica
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Claytonia+virginica

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Allium cupanii

Botanical Name : Allium cupanii
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. moschatum
Division:Vascular plants
Kingdom:plants
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms : Allium moschatum

Common Names:

Habitat : Allium cupanii is native to S. Europe – Mediterranean to W. Asia.( with a range extending from Spain to Iran.) It grows on the pinus nigra forest, amongst Quercus parygana, alpine and grey steppe rocky places on limestone, serpentine and schist, to 2200 metres in Turkey….CLICK &  SEE THE PICTURES

Description:
Allium moschatum is a bulb-forming perennial. Flowers are born in umbels on top of thin, wiry scapes rarely more than 15 cm tall; tepals white with a thin but prominent purple midvein.. It is in flower in August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.

The species is divided into the following species:
*A. c. Cupani
*A. c. Cyprium
Cultivation:
Requires a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. Only hardy in the milder areas of the country, tolerating temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c. The bulbs show some summer dormancy and so are best grown in a bulb frame, water being withheld in late summer. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Most members of this genus are intolerant of competition from other growing plants. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when
Seed – so they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. The plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season, pot up the divisions in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are growing well and then plant them out into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses: Bulb – raw or cooked. The bulb is up to 15mm in diameter. Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles.

Known Hazards: Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_moschatum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+cupanii

Allium carinatum

 

Botanical Name : Allium carinatum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. carinatum
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Names: Keeled garlic, Witch’s garlic

Habitat:Allium carinatum is considered native to the Mediterranean Region from Spain to Turkey, north to Sweden and the Baltic Republics. It is naturalized in the British Isles. It grows in the dry grassy places and open woods.

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Description:

Allium carinatum produces a single small bulb rarely more than 15 mm long, flat leaves, and an umbel of purple to reddish-purple flowers. The flowers are on long pedicels and often nodding (hanging downwards] It is not frost tender. It is in flower from Jun to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects…..CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Varieties
Numerous botanical names have been coined within the species at the varietal level, but only two are recognized:

*Allium carinatum subsp. carinatum – most of species range
*Allium carinatum subsp. pulchellum (G.Don) Bonnier & Layens – central Europe + Balkans
Cultivation:
Prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil. Succeeds in clay soils. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Most members of this genus are intolerant of competition from other growing plants. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. A good plant for the wild garden. This species can become very invasive by means of its bulbils. The sub-species A. carinatum pulchellum Bonnier.&Layens. is much better behaved and makes a good garden plant. Closely allied to A. oleraceum. Produces new growth in early autumn. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. Very easy, the plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season and the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required. Bulbils are harvested in late summer and can be planted out immediately in situ or stored and planted out in spring.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.
Bulb – raw or cooked. The bulb is very small, about 15mm tall and 10mm in diameter. Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Bulbils – raw or cooked. Rather small and fiddly to use, but they have a fairly pleasant onion/garlic flavour.
Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles. It is cultivated in many places as an ornamental and also for its potently aromatic bulbs used as a food flavoring.
Known Hazards: Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_carinatum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+carinatum

Allium bisceptrum

Botanical Name : Allium bisceptrum
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily:Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. bisceptrum
Kingdom: Plantae

Synonyms:
*Allium bisceptrum var. palmeri (S. Watson) Cronquist
*Allium bisceptrum var. utahense M.E. Jones
*Allium palmeri S. Watson

Common Names: Twincrest onion,Aspen Onion

Habitat:Allium bisceptrum is native to Western N. America – Oregon to California (California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Utah. ) It grows on the meadows and aspen groves, occasionally on open slopes.
Description:
Allium bisceptrum is twincrest onion which is a perennial herb at altitudes ranging from 2000 to 2900 meters.It is a is a bulb growing to 0.3 m (1ft). They grow up to anywhere between ten to forty cm high. The onion bulbs are round and egg-shaped. The bulbs have a light tint and when cut, has a powerful odor. Their flower heads are about 10–15 mm in length. The flowers are a lightly tinted purple. Each flower head contains usually six petals with pointed tips. Their flat leaves usually come in pairs of two or three and give off an odor when scratched.

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It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root; Seed.
Bulb – raw or cooked. They were usually harvested in spring or early summer. The bulbs are 10 – 15mm wide. Leaves – raw or cooked. Used as a relish. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads. The seed heads can be placed in hot ashes for a few minutes, then the seeds extracted and eaten.
Medicinal Uses:
The plant juice has been used as an appetite restorer. Although no other specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses: The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles. Wild animals in the area such as elk, black bears, white-tailed prairie dogs, and mantled ground squirrels eat the bulbs of the wild onions. Some cattle and sheep also graze these plants.

Known Hazards : Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_bisceptrum
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+bisceptrum

Allium akaka

Botanical Name : Allium akaka
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Genus: Allium
Species:A. akaka
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Synonyms : A. latifolium.

Habitat :Allium akaka is native to W. Asia – Turkey, N. Iran, Russia. It grows on the dry stony places, screes etc, 1600 metres to 3000 metres

Description:
Allium akaka (Onion). This species of bulbous perennial, growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in) by 0.1 m (0ft 4in).It produces wide grey-green leaves that are oblong to elliptic. The flowers are produced in umbels of star-shaped flowers in either punk-purple, purple or off-white, which are borne in the spring.It is not frost tender. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, insects. The bulbs are almost spherical.

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Cultivation:
Prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained dry to moist soil. Bulbs are not hardy in all parts of Britain, they probably tolerate temperatures down to between -5 and -10°c but because of their need for a very well-drained dry to moist soil are probably best grown in a bulb frame. The plants need a dry period in late summer when they are dormant in order to fully ripen the bulb. The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply. Most members of this genus are intolerant of competition from other growing plants. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other. This species is a cultivated crop in Iran, where it is sold in the bazaars of Teheran. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.
Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle – if you want to produce clumps more quickly then put three plants in each pot. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in spring once they are growing vigorously and are large enough. Division in spring. The plants divide successfully at any time in the growing season, pot up the divisions in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are growing well and then plant them out into their permanent positions.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves; Root.

Bulb – raw or cooked. Used as an onion substitute. The whole of the young plant is said to be a great delicacy and is used as an addition to rice in a pilau. The bulb is 15 – 30mm wide. Leaves – raw or cooked. Flowers – raw. Used as a garnish on salads.

Medicinal Uses:
Although no specific mention of medicinal uses has been seen for this species, members of this genus are in general very healthy additions to the diet. They contain sulphur compounds (which give them their onion flavour) and when added to the diet on a regular basis they help reduce blood cholesterol levels, act as a tonic to the digestive system and also tonify the circulatory system.

Other Uses:..Repellent….The growing plant is said to repel insects and moles.

Known Hazards : Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allium_akaka
https://www.greenplantswap.co.uk/plants/696
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Allium+akaka