Smoking and the Digestive System

Smoking has direct effect on Digestive System:
Smoking can harm your digestive system in a number of ways. Smokers tend to get heartburn and peptic ulcers more often than nonsmokers. Smoking makes those conditions harder to treat. Smoking increases the risk for Crohn’s disease and gallstones. It also increases the risk of more damage in liver disease. Smoking can also make pancreatitis worse. In addition, smoking is associated with cancer of the digestive organs, including the head and neck, stomach, pancreas, and colon.

Smoking affects the entire body, increasing the risk of many life-threatening diseases—including lung cancer, emphysema, and heart disease. Smoking also contributes to many cancers and diseases of the digestive system. Estimates show that about one-fifth of all adults smoke,1 and each year at least 443,000 Americans die from diseases caused by cigarette smoking.

Smoking contributes to many common disorders of the digestive system, such as heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcers, and some liver diseases. Smoking increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, colon polyps, and pancreatitis, and it may increase the risk of gallstones.

Quitting smoking can improve the digestive system:
Quitting smoking can reverse some of the effects of smoking on the digestive system. For example, the balance between factors that harm and protect the stomach and duodenum lining returns to normal within a few hours of a person quitting smoking. The effects of smoking on how the liver handles medications also disappear when a person stops smoking. However, people who stop smoking continue to have a higher risk of some digestive diseases, such as colon polyps and pancreatitis, than people who have never smoked.12, 13

Quitting smoking can improve the symptoms of some digestive diseases or keep them from getting worse. For example, people with Crohn’s disease who quit smoking have less severe symptoms than smokers with the disease.

Points to Remember:
*Smoking has been found to increase the risk of cancers of the mouth, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas. Research suggests that smoking may also increase the risk of cancers of the liver, colon, and rectum.

*Smoking increases the risk of heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

*Smoking increases the risk of peptic ulcers.

*Smoking may worsen some liver diseases, including primary biliary cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

*Current and former smokers have a higher risk of developing Crohn’s disease than people who have never smoked.
People who smoke are more likely to develop colon polyps.

*Smoking increases the risk of developing pancreatitis.

*Some studies have shown that smoking may increase the risk of developing gallstones. However, research results are not consistent and more study is needed.

*Quitting smoking can reverse some of the effects of smoking on the digestive system.

ALWAYS REMEMBER BY  GIVING UP  SMOKING  YOU ARE NOT ONLY SAVING YOUR HEALTH,  YOU ARE SAVING YOUR FAMILY,   YOUR SOCIETY  AND THE WHOLE HUMAN COMMUNITY. 

  SMOKING IS A SIN AS IT IS HARMFUL FOR THE WHOLE  HUMAN BEING.


CLICK TO READ HOW TO QUIT SMOKING FOREVER 

Resources:
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/conditions/digestive_disorders/smoking_and_the_digestive_system_134,177
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/smoking-digestive-system

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