Categories
Fish

Chitala chitala

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Binomial name: Chitala chitala
Kingdom:: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Osteoglossiformes
Family: Notopteridae
Genus: Chitala
Species:: C. chitala

Other Names: Indian featherback

Bengali Name: Chitol mach

Habitat : This fish is native to India,Bangladesh,Pakisthan & Nepal.They normally grow in big river basins.This is grown in lakes also.

Description:
Chitala chitala reaches a maximum length of 122 cm (48 in), but more commonly reaches about 75 cm (30 in). It is overall silvery in color. Unlike all its relatives, it usually (but not always) has a series of golden or silvery bars along the back, resulting in a faint striped appearance. Additionally, it has a series of fairly small, sometimes indistinct, non-ocellated dark spots towards the far rear of the body (at the “tail”). This separates it from C. ornata, which has ocellated spots (dark spots surrounded by a paler ring) and lacks bars along the back. The two species have frequently been confused.

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Food Value:
Chitala chitala fish is very tasty, particularly it’s stomach portion.The back portion is bony, but commercially important in native range; flesh minced, made into balls, and cooked with curry.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chitala_chitala

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Categories
Fish

Bangana ariza

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Binomial name: Bangana ariza
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Cypriniformes
Family: Cyprinidae
Subfamily: Labeoninae
Genus: Bangana
Species: B. ariza

Other Names: Bangana ariza, the Reba or ariza labeo, is a cyprinid fish found in India, Nepal, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, and Pakistan

In Bengal it is called Bata mach.

Habitat : Bangana ariza is found in waters on the Indus plain and adjoining hilly areas in Pakistan; in the Ganges-Brahmaputra basins in India, Nepal, and Bangladesh; the basins of the Mahanadi, Krishna and Cauvery, as well as some smaller basins in southern India; the Karnapouli and adjacent smaller basins in Chittagong Hill Tracts in Bangladesh. It has also been reported from Myanmar.

Description:
Bangana ariza occurs in clear rivers and tanks, feeding on plankton and detritus. It breeds in flooded shallows in June–September. Its growth fairly rapid; and it can reach lengths of about 30 cm in natural waters. The males are smaller than females. It is grown in aquaculture ponds in India where breeding is induced by hypophysation, a technique of artificially encouraging fish to reproduce by removing the hypophysis or pituitary gland from a fish, preparing it and then injecting the preparation into another mature fish, of either sex, to promote final maturation and spawning. However, the fry of this species are readlily available in July–September in rivers such as the Cauvery and Bhavani, especially at dawn and dusk. These are collected to stock ponds and in even seasonal waters due to their rapid growth.

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Bangana ariza has thin stripes lying mainly dorsally of the lateral line; larger specimens often have a broad mid-lateral stripe. The colour of this species in life is variable, from dull dirty white or greyish to silvery or yellow, and the narrow stripes van vary in their distinctivenes.

Food value: Bangana ariza fish is very tasty fish. It’s meat contains lots of calcium and phosperous. In Bengal most people like this fish.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangana_ariza

Categories
Fish

Nibea soldado

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Binomial name: Nibea soldado
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Sciaenidae
Genus: Nibea
Species:N. soldado

Other Names:Soldier croaker
Bengali Name: Bhola Vetki mach

Habitat : Nibea soldado is native to the northern Indian and western Pacific Oceans, and found in estuaries of south and southeast Asia, Indochina and northern Australia.Indo-West Pacific: coasts of India and Sri Lanka eastwards extending to Queensland, Australia and New Guinea and north to Viet Nam (Ref. 3490). Found in the lower Mekong basin

Description:
Dorsal spines (total): 10 – 11; Dorsal soft rays (total): 27-33; Anal spines: 2; Anal soft rays: 7. Snout rounded, but not swollen or projecting; upper jaw length 38-44 % of head length, lower jaw length 44-53 % of head length. First pair of mental pores close together, united by a crescent-shaped groove just behind symphysis. Teeth differentiated into large and small in both jaws. Second anal spine long, stiff, 39-59 % of head length. From 8 to 13 scale rows above lateral line to origin of dorsal fin, 12-17 scale rows below lateral line to origin of anal fin (total 21-29 scale rows). Swim bladder carrot-shaped, with 18-22 pairs of arborescent appendages along its sides, the first pair entering head beyond transverse septum. Sagitta (large earstone) with a tadpole-shaped impression, the tail of which is J-shaped.

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Food Value:
YOU MAY CLICK TO LEAR :

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibea_soldado
https://www.fishbase.de/summary/8309

Categories
Fish

Awaous guamensis

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Binomial name: Awaous guamensis
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Perciformes
Family: Gobiidae
Genus: Awaous
Species: A. guamensis

Common name(s): ‘O‘opu n?kea

Other names: Bai-la,
Bengali Name: Bala mach

Habitat: Awaous guamensis is a species of goby native to the Pacific islands from Mariana to Vanuatu, New Caledonia and Fiji where it can be found in fresh, brackish and marine waters. It is available from just above sea level to mid-elevation reaches of streams.It grows in India & Bangladesh

Description:
Males can reach a length of 24.5 cm (9.6 in) SL while females only reach 16.5 cm (6.5 in). Recent work based upon morphological and genetic differences has recognized Hawaiian populations of Awaous as being distinct from Awaous guamensis. Consequently, Hawaiian Awaous are now recognized as a distinct species Awaous stamineus.

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Food Value: Bengalis like this fish very much. It has very high protein. Red blood cells are absent in this fish. Bala mach curry is a palatable dish for Bengalis.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Awaous_guamensis
http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/waipio/Critter%20pages/awaous.html

Categories
Fish

Basa (fish)

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Binomial name: Pangasius bocourti
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Siluriformes
Family: Pangasiidae
Genus: Pangasius
Species: P. bocourti

Synonym(s): Pangasius altifrons

Other Names: “basa fish”, “swai”, or “bocourti”. In the UK all species of Pangasius may legally be described as “river cobbler”, “cobbler”, “basa”, “pangasius”, “panga”

Habitat : Basa fish is native toccCambodia; China (Yunnan); Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Thailand; Viet Nam, India, Bangla dash

Description:
The body of the basa fish is stout and heavy. The rounded head is broader than it is long, with the blunt snout having a white band on its muzzle. This species grows to a maximum length of 120 centimetres.

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Food Value:

Calories:
Basa fish fillets are low in calories, as a 100-gram fillet contains 90 calories. This amount comprises just 4.5 percent of the daily suggested calorie intake of 2,000. If  one is dieting, basa fillets can be a good choice, as it would take less than 10 minutes of jogging or less than 11 minutes of swimming to burn the calories in a 100-gram basa fillet.

Fat:
Basa fillets are moderately high in fat, considering the low calorie content. Each 100-gram fillet contains 4 grams of fat, so fat comprises 40 percent of the calories in the fillet. Only 1 gram of the fat comes from saturated fat, a type of fat that can increase your cholesterol levels. Dietary fat is high in calories but it is vital for optimal health, as it helps your body absorb vitamins and aids in proper growth and development.
Omega-3 Fatty Acids

 

Approximately 2.6 to 6.7 percent of the fat content of a serving of basa consists of omega-3 fatty acids. A high intake of these fatty acids — particularly DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, and EPA, or eicosapentaenoic acid — are linked to a decreased risk of heart disease. To get enough, the American Heart Association recommends that  one should have at least two 3.5-oz. servings of fish like basa each week.

Protein:

Basa fillets are rich in protein, as a 100-gram fillet contains 14 grams. This amount is more than twice the protein in an egg, but a basa fillet contains 50 fewer calories than two eggs would provide.  Every one’s  body needs protein to maintain the integrity of  the existing cells and tissues and build new tissues.

Carbohydrates:

Basa fillets contain no carbohydrates, so  one can eat this fish on a low-carbohydrate diet. While low-carbohydrate diets can help  to lose weight,  one don’t need to restrict carbohydrates to diet successfully.

Choloesterol:

Basa fillets are relatively high in cholesterol, as a 100-gram fillet contains 50 mg of cholesterol. This amount comprises 25 percent of the daily suggested limit of 200 mg. Too much cholesterol can increase your risk of heart disease.

Sodium:

Basa fillets are relatively low in sodium, with 50 mg per fillet. The daily recommended intake of sodium is 2,300 mg, so a 100-gram basa fillet contains just 2 percent of this amount.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basa_(fish)
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/180848/0
https://www.livestrong.com/article/495946-nutrition-in-a-basa-fillet/#