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Fruits & Vegetables

Pulasan

Botanical Name: Nephelium ramboutan-ake
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Family: Sapindaceae
Genus: Nephelium
Species: N. ramboutan-ake

Synonyms:
*Litchi ramboutan-ake Labill.
*Nephelium mutabile Blume

Common Names : Pulasan, kapulasan (Indonesia), Ngoh-khonsan (Thailand) and Bulala (Philippines)

Habitat:
The pulasan is native to Peninsular Malaysia. Wild trees are infrequent in lowland forests around Perak, Malaysia but abundant in the Philippines at low elevations from Luzon to Mindanao. The tree has long been cultivated in the Malay Peninsula and Thailand; is rarely domesticated in the Philippines. Ochse reported that there were extensive plantings in Java only around Bogor and the villages along the railway between Bogor and Jakarta. Found mostly in lowland primary forests, often on river banks but rarely in swamps, usually on sand or clay.

Description:
The name pulasan comes from the Malay word pulas (twist) related to “pilas” (remove) of Tagalog. The fruit is opened through the act of twisting the fruit with both hands, thus the name pulasan.

Pulasan is a semi-deciduous, ornamental tree. It attains a height of 10–15 m and has a short trunk to 30–40 cm thick. The branchlets are brown and hairy when young. The alternate leaves, pinnate or odd-pinnate, are 17–45 cm long, have 2 to 5 pairs of opposite or nearly opposite leaflets, are oblong or elliptic-lanceolate, 6.25-17.5 cm long and up to 5 cm wide; slightly wavy, dark-green and barely glossy on the upper surface; pale, and somewhat bluish, with a few short, silky hairs on the underside. Very small, greenish, petalless flowers with 4-5 hairy sepals are borne singly or in clusters on the branches of the erect, axillary or terminal, panicles clothed with fine yellowish or brownish hairs.

The pulasan is ultra-tropical and thrives only in very humid regions between 360 and 1,150 ft (110–350 m) of altitude. In Malaya, it is said that the tree bears best after a long, dry season.

The fruit is ovoid, 5-7.5 cm long, dark red, with its thick, leathery rind closely set with conical, blunt-tipped tubercles or thick, fleshy, straight spines, which are up to 1 cm long. There may be one or two small, undeveloped fruits nestled close to the stem. Within is the glistening, white or yellowish-white flesh (aril) to 1 cm thick, more or less clinging to the thin, grayish-brown seedcoat (testa) which separates from the seed. The flavour is generally much sweeter than that of the rambutan. The seed is ovoid, oblong or ellipsoid, light brown, somewhat flattened on one side, and 2 to 3.5 cm long.

While very similar to rambutan, the fruit lacks the hairy spines. The flesh is very sweet and juicy, and separates easily from the seed, much more easily than the rambutan. In addition, unlike the seed of the rambutan, the seed of the pulasan is readily edible raw. It has a flavour somewhat similar to that of almonds.

There are two varieties of Pulasan one is dark red and the other one is light red. The dark red fruit haves a seed that separates easily from the flesh whereas the light red fruit haves a seed that sticks on to the flesh of the fruit.

CLICK & SEE…….TREE……..FRUITS

Cultivation:
Pulasan grows best in the lowland humid tropics at an elevation below 600 metres. It grows best in areas where annual daytime temperatures are within the range 26 – 32°c, but can tolerate 18 – 38°c. The plant cannot tolerate frost. It prefers a mean annual rainfall in the range 2,000 – 3,000mm, but tolerates 1,350 – 4,100mm. Grows best in a sunny position, tolerating some shade. Prefers a sand or clay soil. Succeeds in most well-drained soils. Prefers a pH in the range 5 – 5.8, tolerating 4.3 – 8. There are some named varieties. Some of the varieties bear parthenocarpic fruit. Being overshadowed by good rambutan cultivars, this species has little prospect of being develop for commercial cultivation. However, it is a good potential genetic source in breeding programmes with the rambutan.

Propagation:
Pulasan can be propagated by seed and grafting methods. Grafting is a common practice among horticulturalists that often is a proactive method of preventing disease, by using healthy rootstocks. Though starting by seed can be successful, most producers will not use this method of propagation due to variation in gender, which causes chance in having an actual fruiting tree.

Edible Uses:
Pulasan is usually eaten fresh, though it resembles much like Rambutan, it is different from Rambutan and haves its own characteristics. The flesh of the red tropical fruit is either eaten raw or made into a jam. The seeds of the exotic fruits are boiled or roasted to prepare a beverage resembling cocoa.

Nutrition Facts of Pulasan:
Per 100 g of flesh of pulasan fruit contains about 84.54 percent to 90.87 percent of moisture and other nutrition benefits.

Nutrients……. Amount
Protein……… 0.82 g
Carbohydrates…. 12.86 g
Fiber……………… 0.14 g
Fat…………. 0.55 g
Calcium …………….0.01-0.05 mg
Iron………… 0.002 mg
Vitamin C……. 11 mg

Medicinal Uses:
The decotion of the fruit is highly used bathing fever patients.The roots have medicinal properties.

Other Uses:
An oil obtained from the seeds is used in lamps. The wood is hard. A useful timber, but rarely used because the fruit is too valuable to merit the tree being felled.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulasan
https://www.fruitsinfo.com/pulasan-tropical-fruit.php
https://www.medindia.net/patients/lifestyleandwellness/health-benefits-of-pulasan.htm
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Nephelium+ramboutan-ake

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Categories
Fruits & Vegetables

Pineberry

Botanical Name: Pineberry
Genus:Fragaria
Species : F. virginiana x chiloensis
Cultivar:Pineberry

Habitat: Pineberries come from breeding strawberry stocks from Chile and Virginia. The first commercial cultivation occurred in 2010 in the Netherlands and Belgium. Pineberry was first sold commercially in the United States in 2012. Pineberry has been marketed to restaurants, bakeries and wholesale markets in Europe and Dubai. The berry was dubbed “pineberry” for the UK market where it became available in 2010 to reflect its “pineapple” flavor while appearing to be a strawberry.

Description:
A pineberry is smaller than a common strawberry, measuring between 15 to 23 mm (0.6 to 0.9 in). When ripe, it is almost completely white, but with red “seeds” (achenes). The plant is disease resistant, but is highly priced, although not very profitable due to small-scale farming, small berry size and low yield. Pineberries are available in the spring and summer.Strawberry Pineberry has a wonderful sweet taste like pineapple. Originating from South America, this variety has been re-introduced some years ago in Europe and is a true must have for both the experienced and novice strawberry gardener and -grower. Harvesting Strawberry Pineberry can be started from June 10 until the end of June.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Resources:
https://infinity.icicibank.com/corp/AuthenticationController?FORMSGROUP_ID__=AuthenticationFG&START_TRAN_FLAG=Y&FG_BUTTONS__=LOAD&ACTION.LOAD=Y&AuthenticationFG.LOGIN_FLAG=1&BANK_ID=ICI&_ga=1.154939135.612988567.1465880869

Categories
Fruits & Vegetables

Pili Nut

Botanical Name: Canarium ovatum
Family: Burseraceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Genus: Canarium
Species: C. ovatum

Common Names: Pili Nut

Habitat: Pili Nut is native to maritime Southeast Asia, Papua New Guinea, and Northern Australia. They are commercially cultivated in the Philippines for their edible nuts. Pili is a tropical tree preferring deep, fertile, well drained soil, warm temperatures, and well distributed rainfall. It cannot tolerate the slightest frost or low temperature. It grows in forests where rainfall is abundant. Low to medium elevations in primary and secondary forests.

Description:
The pili tree is an attractive, symmetrically-shaped evergreen, averaging 20 m (66 ft) tall with resinous wood and resistance to strong winds. It is dioecious, with flowers borne on cymose inflorescence at the leaf axils of young shoots. As in papaya and rambutan, functional hermaphrodites exist in pili. Pollination is by insects. Flowering of pili is frequent and fruits ripen through a prolonged period of time. The ovary contains three locules, each with two ovules; most of the time only one ovule develops (Chandler 1958).

The pili fruit is a drupe, 4 to 7 cm (1.6 to 2.8 in) long, 2.3 to 3.8 cm (0.91 to 1.50 in) in diameter, and weighs 15.7 to 45.7 g (0.035 to 0.101 lb). The skin (exocarp) is smooth, thin, shiny, and turns purplish black when the fruit ripens; the pulp (mesocarp) is fibrous, fleshy, and greenish yellow in color, and the hard shell (endocarp) within protects a normally dicotyledonous embryo. The basal end of the shell (endocarp) is pointed and the apical end is more or less blunt; between the seed and the hard shell (endocarp) is a thin, brownish, fibrous seed coat developed from the inner layer of the endocarp. This thin coat usually adheres tightly to the shell and/or the seed. Much of the kernel weight is made up of the cotyledons, which are about 4.1 to 16.6% of the whole fruit; it is composed of approximately 8% carbohydrate, 11.5 to 13.9% protein, and 70% fat. Kernels from some trees may be bitter, fibrous or have a turpentine odor.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES.TREE……....FLOWER…....FRUIT

Edible Uses:
Seed is eaten – raw or cooked. A popular nut. The sweet nuts have a delicious flavour. When raw, their flavour resembles roasted pumpkin seed, when roasted their mild, nutty flavour and tender, crispy texture are superior to the almond. They can also be used in confections, ice cream, nut milks etc, and as an adulterant to chocolate. The coat surrounding the kernel should be removed since it can cause diarrhoea. The shell is very thick and difficult to crack, though some thinner shelled forms have been found. Nutritionally, the kernel contains 71.1% fat, 11.4% protein and 8.4% carbohydrates; it is high in calcium, phosphorus and potassium. The kernel is a major ingredient in a famous Chinese festive dessert known as the ‘moon cake’. However, kernels from some trees may be bitter, fibrous or have a turpentine odour. The seed keeps very well in storage. A sweet, light-yellow oil obtained from the seed is used for cooking purposes. It is comparable in quality to that of olive oil, containing up to 59% oleic glycerides and 32-59% of palmitic glycerides. An oil can be extracted from the fruit pulp. It has a tangy, resin-like flavour and can be used for cooking. The fruit pulp is boiled, seasoned and eaten. Rather tasteless. It resembles the sweet potato in texture, it is oily (about 12%) and is considered to have food value similar to the avocado. Young shoots – raw. Eaten in salads.

Medicinal Uses:
The resin is soft, odorous and has the texture of honey. It was formerly exported for the European pharmaceutical trade as Manila or Philippine gum elemi for use as an ointment for healing wounds and as a plaster. The bark is used in the treatment of malaria. The leaves are used in the treatment of vertigo. Raw nuts are a purgative.

Other Uses:
Shade tree, Street tree, Nut tree, Public open space. Agroforestry Uses: The tree makes an excellent windbreak as it resists strong winds and even typhoons. Other Uses: The hard and thick shell that encloses the kernel makes an excellent fuel for cooking. The possibility of using the shell as a source for making charcoal and activated carbon for industry has yet to be explored. Polished and varnished, the stony thick shell becomes an attractive ornament. The stony shells are excellent as a porous, inert growth medium for orchids and anthuriums. A valuable resin, called Manila elemi or ‘breabianca’, is used as an ingredient in the manufacture of plastics, printing inks and perfumes. It is also is used by the Spaniards for ship repair. The plant contains two different oils. That obtained from the seed is of similar quality to olive oil. An oil contained in the fruit pulp can be extracted and used as a substitute for cottonseed oil in the manufacture of soap and edible products. It is used in making suntan lotions and cosmetics. The reddish wood is hard and considered to be similar to mahogany. The resin-rich wood makes good firewood. This species is one of the sources of kedondong timber, which is obtained from several species in the family Burseraceae. We do not have a specific description of the wood for this species, but the general description of kedondong wood is as follows:- The heartwood is generally a light brown; it is not sharply demarcated from the 3 – 5cm wide band of lighter-coloured sapwood. The texture is moderately fine and even; the grain is interlocked to wavy; the surface is lustrous. The wood is light in weight; moderately hard; not very durable, being susceptible to fungi, dry wood borers and termites. It seasons somewhat slowly with only a slight risk of checking and distortion; once dry it is moderately stable to stable in service. The wood has a fairly high blunting effect, stellite-tipped and tungsten carbide tools are recommended; it is moderately easy to slightly difficult to plane; finishes smooth to rough; can be easy to very difficult to bore; slightly difficult to difficult to turn; nailing and screwing properties are good; gluing is correct. The wood is suitable for internal use as a general utility timber for planking, cladding, plywood, flooring, furniture, packing cases, pallets and general carpentry work

Cultivation:
Pili is a tree of the hot, wet tropical lowlands, where it is usually found at elevations below 400 metres. It grows best in areas where annual daytime temperatures are within the range 22 – 34°c, but can tolerate 12 – 40°c. It cannot withstand low temperatures or even the slightest frost. It prefers a rainfall that is distributed throughout the year with a mean annual rainfall in the range 2,000 – 3,000mm, but tolerates 1,000 – 4,000mm. Succeeds in both light and heavy soils. Prefers a well-drained soil. Prefers a pH in the range 5 – 6, tolerating 4.5 – 6.5. Mature trees can resist strong winds. Trees flower all year round. Young seedling trees can grow to a height of 2 metres or more in about 3 – 4 years, and do not usually produce side branches until this stage. Seedling trees can produce their first flowers when about 4 years old. On average, seedling trees start producing fruit 5 – 6 years after planting. Clonal trees bear fruit 3 – 4 years after planting. Full production commences at around the age of 12 – 15 years Yields of 140 kilos or more per tree have been obtained. Wild forms usually have three, sometimes two kernels present in the nut, each in its own compartment. In the case of cultivated trees, however, only one kernel is sometimes found in each nut. When this is so, the kernel is proportionately larger and the nut easier to crack. The tree is cultivated more or less by accident, having appeared as self-sown seedlings in hemp and coconut plantations. Trees are dioecious – both male and female forms would normally need to be grown in order to produce fruit and seed. Functional hermaphrodites, however, exist within the species.

Propagation:
Seed – most kernels tend to stick to their shell when fresh but come off easily after being dried to 3 – 5% mc, which takes 27 – 28 hours at 30°c. The pericarp is also removed prior to sowing by dipping the fruits in hot water. Sow the seeds in light shade in individual containers or in a nursery seedbed. The seedlings take 40 – 50 days to emerge, and should be potted into individual containers as soon as they are large enough to handle. The transplanted seedling initially grows slowly, but soon the growth rate picks up, stem height and girth increasing rapidly and new leaves unfolding continuously. Plant out when 25 – 30cm tall. One year-old seedlings can be used for rootstock. Asexual propagation is best through patch budding, which has a claimed success rate of 85 – 90% in the Philippines. Cleft grafting is also successful.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canarium_ovatum
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?Latin

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Fruits & Vegetables

Pigface

Botanical Name: Carpobrotus glaucescens
Family: Aizoaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Carpobrotus
Species: C. glaucescens

Common Names:Pigface or Angular sea-fig

Habitat: Pigface is native to temperate eastern Australia. It is a succulent coastal groundcover.Grows near the sea.

Description:
Pigface is a perennial flowering plant growing to 0.3 m (1ft) by 2 m (6ft 7in). The plant is a coastal ground cover one which originates from temperate eastern Australia. Leaves have 3.5-10 cm and 9-15 mm length and width, Flowers hold light purple color with width 3.2-6 cm, and Fruits with length and width of 2-3 cm and 1.6-2.4 cm possess a red to purple color. The pulp of the fruit is consumable having a flavor which is similar to that of a salty strawberry or kiwifruit. These wild fruits are considered the favorites of Australia for its well known taste, after the ripening they become purple and their pulp is eaten by squeezing it out.

CLICK & SEE…....PLANT…….FLOWERS.……....FRUITS

Cultivation:
The plant grows mostly in the duration between Summer and Spring, They are cultivated in two ways, directly through the seeds else with the help of cuttings, Propagation process is done by layering method easily in which the horizontal stem cuttings are rooted this is the way the plant actually grows by nature. The layers must have a length of 30 cm and a depth of 5cm bellow the sand. The plants rise from the cut pieces too or various divisions of bigger plants.

Propagation:
The preferable method for propagation is done by laying out a long stem on the ground and covered, leaving out 2- 3 cm in contact with soil. The plant forms roots easily as their nodes have the capacity to produce roots easily. Additively, when you grow from cuttings, 10 cm from the base is uprooted and kept into a potting mixture and must stay moist until the plant produces roots, Other different method is that the cuttings must be placed wherever we want them to grow in the garden following the same method with a condition but making sure it does not perish.

Edible Uses:
Pigface plants bear a red-purple berry fruit; the aborigine natives used it as a major source of food earlier. Their pulp’s taste are similar to salty apples. Roasted from of their leaves are used as a replacement of salt and also to obtain dietary salt. The fruits central part is appetizing . Base of the fruit is squeezed into mouth, if collected from beach tastes salty. Since the fruits are Aborigines famous ones they are ate as sweets.

Medicinal Uses & Health Benefits:
The plant is utilized for the anti-scurvy treatment which was in practice since the European Explorers arrival. The plants juice aids in soothing the pain caused by insect bites . The Carpobrotus glaucescens’s fruit juice is made us as a mild astringent. On external application to the skin it acts as a universal first aid medicament for jelly fish and similar stings. It helps in eradicating stomach based problems such as diarrhea and stomach cramps when coupled with water, Similar to that of aloe vera its application on skin heals skin based complications such as wounds, mosquito bites, sunburns and treatment for various skin conditions, Also treats tuberculosis when combined with honey and olive oil, The fruit holds laxative property so solves ringworm, eczema, dermatitis, herpes, thrush, cold sores, cracked lips, chafing, skin conditions and allergies, Traditional treatment for constipation when eaten with brackish water. Due to its laxative nature a syrup is prepared by the use of this fruit. A traditional medicament for TB is done by using a combination of equal proportions of leaf, juice, honey and olive oil mixed with water.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpobrotus_glaucescens
https://www.fruitsinfo.com/pigface-fruit.php

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Fruits & Vegetables

Pigeon plum

Botanical Name: Coccoloba diversifolia
Family: Polygonaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Coccoloba
Species: C. diversifolia

Common Names: Pigeon plum and Tietongue

Habitat: Pigeon plum is native to coastal areas of the Caribbean, Central America (Belize, Guatemala), southern Mexico, southern Florida (coastal regions from Cape Canaveral to the Florida Keys) and The Bahamas.

Description:
Pigeon plum is a small to medium-sized tree growing upright, densely-foliated, rounded evergreen tree is usually seen at 15 to 25 feet and a spread of 20 to 35 feet, though it can grow larger. Young trees appear pyramidal until the multiple trunks begin spreading.
The bark is light gray, smooth, and thin but may become scaly on the largest trees.This can form a rounded vase on older specimens. It is a wonderful small to medium-sized tree for subtropical landscapes, typically sporting a multiple trunk. Trunks often grow almost parallel to each other, and embedded or included bark forms regularly, but this does not appear to compromise the wood strength of Pigeon-Plum. The four-inch-long, shiny, dark green, leathery leaves drop uniformly in March but quickly emerge as bright red new growth…....CLICK & SEE

The numerous, inconspicuous flowers appear on spikes 1.5–18 cm long in the spring. The fruit is an achene 6–10 mm long surrounded by a dark purple edible fleshy perianth, ripen in late fall and winter and are very attractive to birds.

The tree is unable to survive hard frost. It is resistant to high winds, salt and drought.

Cultivation:
The pigeon plum grows best in moist, well-drained soil in areas that receive full sun or partial shade. The tree makes a good shade tree, with its dense branches and is often used in landscaping, or as planted in median strips along highways. Pigeon plums usually contain multiple trunks that grow parallel to one another. The trees are unaffected by high winds, droughts, and salty conditions, so they can grow in sandy, rocky areas along tidewater areas. The species is often used as a hurricane barrier in coastal areas.

Edible Uses: Fruits are edible. The fruit comes under the dry fruit classification known as achene which is 6-10 mm in length enclosed by a dark edible fleshy perianth ripening takes place in the fall, the flowers on the female trees are followed by the fruit appearing smaller in size , oval to round, with a diameter of ½ inch , The ripening takes place during autumn and winter, they turn out to be dark red or purplish. The fruit resembles an achene and grown as groups only. The thin pulpy coat is covered by a single layered large hard ‘stone’. The fruits are eaten by birds and animals and dispersed making it very sour and astringent for human taste so they are stored for few days and then consumed. The fruit’s juice is used in preparing jelly and a perfect wine too. The fruits are not consumed and sold in the local markets which happened only in the past.

Medicinal Uses:
The fruits are utilized in Bahamas to treat gastrointestinal problems such as diarrhea also a soothing material and also in aphrodisiac teas. Their fruits are consumable either raw state or even used in preparation of jellies and wine too.

Other Uses:Pegion plum is an ornalmental tree, usually planted in median strips along highways. The wooden part is useful in carving. The fruits help in feeding various birds and also iguanas where they evolve.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coccoloba_diversifolia
http://www.floridaplants.com/Reprints/Coccoloba%20diversifolia%20Pigeon-Plum.htm
https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-pigeon-plum.htm