Category Archives: Healthy Tips

Banana Peels are most Useful

This is probably one of the most common fruits that we don’t really relish it as much. But before throwing the banana peel into the bin, read this post to know its benefits. It will give you amazing results.

The flesh of the banana is rich in many nutrients and carbohydrates. It is high in vitamins B6, B12, magnesium and potassium. The sugar content is the highest when the banana peel turns black.

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The top benefits of banana peels:-

1.For Sparkling Teeth:

Rub the banana peel every day for a week on your teeth for about a minute. This actually results in teeth whitening, which can cost a lot of money otherwise.

2. Removes Warts:
The banana peel helps in removing warts and eliminates the occurrence of new ones. For this, simply rub the peel on the affected area or tie the peel overnight on it. This is one of the simplest ways to use a banana peel for the skin.

3. Eat Them:
Banana peels can also be eaten. You can find amazing Indian recipes that use banana peels. They are also used to tender chicken.

4. Cures Pimples:
Just massage banana peels on your face and body for 5 minutes every day to cure pimples. The results should be visible within a week. Keep applying the peels till the acne disappears.

CLICK TO SEE  HOW ACNE  IS TOTALLY CURED BY BANANA PEEL :
Treat Acne & Other Skin Conditions With Banana Peels

5. Reduces Wrinkles:
The banana peel helps to keep your skin hydrated. Add an egg yolk to a mashed banana peel. Apply this mixture on your face and leave it for 5 minutes. Wash off after 5minutes.

6. Pain Reliever:
Apply the banana peel directly on the painful area. Leave it for 30 minutes till the pain is gone. A mixture of vegetable oil and banana peel also helps in pain relief.

7. Heals Psoriasis:
Apply the peel on the psoriasis affected area. The banana peel has moisturizing properties and also reduces itchiness. It will quickly heal psoriasis and you can see noticeable results within no time.

8. Heals Bites By Bugs:
Massage the peel on the mosquito bites to get instant relief from the itching and pain.

9. Shoes, Leather, Silver Polish:
Rub a banana peel on shoes, leather, and silver articles to make them shine instantly.

10. UV Protection:
Banana peel helps in protecting the eyes from the harmful UV rays. Make sure you leave the peel under the sun before rubbing the banana peel on your eyes. It is also proven to reduce the risk of cataracts.

CLICK TO SEE  : 16 Ingenious Ways To Re-Use Banana Peels

Resources:
https://www.stylecraze.com/articles/amazing-benefits-of-banana-peels/#gref

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Treat Leg Pain With RICE

As we age, one or both of our legs can pain. A slip or fall or even an awkward step can sprain the ankle. It bears half the weight of the upright body but is a relatively weak joint. If the ligaments are strained, swelling and pain occur. If the ligaments are torn, there may be bruising as well. The R.I.C.E. treatment (rest, application of ice every 20 minutes, compression with an elastocrepe bandage and elevation ) for 2-3 days will usually work. Medication such as paracetamol and ibuprofen help relieve the pain. If there is no improvement after three days, then it is advised to consult a doctor.

Now what exactly the RICE method of healing injury:-

Step 1: Rest
Pain is your body’s signal that something is wrong. As soon as you’re hurt, stop your activity, and rest as much as possible for the first 2 days. Don’t try to follow the “no pain, no gain” philosophy. Doing so with certain injuries, like a moderate to severe ankle sprain, can make the damage worse and delay your recovery. Doctors say you should avoid putting weight on the injured area for 24 to 48 hours. Resting also helps prevent further bruising.

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Step 2: Ice
Ice is a tried-and-true tool for reducing pain and swelling. Apply an ice pack (covered with a light, absorbent towel to help prevent frostbite) for 10 minutes, then remove for 10 minutes. Repeat this as often as possible for the first 24 to 48 hours after your injury. Don’t have an ice pack? A bag of frozen peas or corn will work just fine.

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Step 3: Compression
This means wrapping the injured area to prevent swelling. Wrap the affected area with an elastic medical bandage (like an ACE bandage). You want it to be snug but not too tight — if it’s too tight, it’ll interrupt blood flow. If the skin below the wrap turns blue or feels cold, numb, or tingly, loosen the bandage. If these symptoms don’t disappear right away, seek immediate medical help.

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Step 4: Elevation
This means raising the sore body part above the level of your heart. Doing so reduces pain, throbbing, and any internal bleeding that can lead to bruises. It’s not as tricky to do as you might think. For example, if you have an ankle sprain, you can prop your leg up on pillows while sitting on the sofa. The CDC recommends you keep the injured area raised whenever possible, even when you’re not icing it.

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Yogurt The best food stuff that everyone should eat


A new study suggests, it could lower the risk of stroke, Victoria Lambert looks at the benefits of this superfood.

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Could a pot of full-fat yogurt for breakfast be an alternative to a daily aspirin to prevent strokes? New research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that a fatty acid found in dairy could lower the risk of death from cardiovascular disease — and strokes in particular.

Moreover, the University of Texas scientists, who analysed nearly 3,000 adults aged over 65 for 22 years, reported that they had found no significant link between dairy fats and heart disease and stroke, two of the biggest killers associated with a diet high in saturated fat.

The report follows another US study which found that men and women who already have high blood pressure are at lower risk of developing cardiovascular disease if they eat more than two servings of yogurt a week. Scientists from the Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts, looked at two large cohorts (55,898 females from the Nurses’ Health Study, and 18,232 males from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study) and found that eating yogurt as part of a healthy diet reduced the risk by 17 per cent in women and 21 per cent in men.

But is yogurt, with its balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat that’s rich in calcium and Vitamin D, really such a “superfood”? Or is it time to rethink everything we thought we knew about its health benefits?

Dieter’s best friend:

Time was when dieters were advised to reach for a yogurt to take the edge off their appetite. Not any more.
“Not if you are opting for a low-fat yogurt which is high in sugar,” says Kim Pearson, a nutritionist based in London. “Some well-known brands contain 20g (five teaspoons) of sugar per serving.”

The NHS recommends that all adults limit sugar consumption to 30g a day. In the new study, the low-fat yogurts contained 17g of sugar and researchers noted that those “seeking to increase yogurt intake should be advised to maintain a healthful eating pattern”.

Triggers asthma :

A study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison published in the Journal of Nutrition last month found that eating 8oz (226gm) of yogurt before a meal improved metabolism and dampened down inflammation, which is associated with chronic conditions like asthma, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

The scientists behind the study, supported by the American National Dairy Council, claim the key is yogurt’s ability to calm chronic inflammation by improving levels of healthy bacteria in the gut.

The news will be of interest to anyone with an allergy-related condition, such as asthma, who may have eschewed dairy thinking it could trigger an attack.

“Calcium-rich dairy products are essential for healthy bones, especially for children and adolescents. And people with asthma can be at higher risk of bone disease osteoporosis because of the use of steroid medication. So, only avoid dairy products if necessary, ensuring you replace them with other sources of calcium.”

Probiotic power :

“Yogurts contain probiotics which can improve a range of gut conditions,” says Dr Foster. “But the dose in the brands you find in supermarkets is so low, it is of negligible benefit. The probiotics get broken down by stomach acid long before they get a chance to be useful.”

An independent Canadian study published in Nutrients in 2017 agrees. Scientists from the University of Toronto looked at 31 studies which found probiotics were associated with “decreased diarrhoea and constipation, improved digestive symptoms, glycaemic control, antioxidant status, blood lipids, oral health and infant breastfeeding outcomes, as well as enhanced immunity and support for Helicobacter pylori [which causes ulcers] eradication.”

But they warned that many of the studies had been funded by the food industry and tested dosages that were up to 25 times the dosage found in most food products. “Many dosages are too low to provide the benefits demonstrated in clinical trials,” warned Dr Mary Scourboutakos, the lead researcher. “Further research is needed to enable more effective use of these functional foods.”

Pearson says: “Consuming probiotics in food is great as everyday maintenance but if it was for a specific purpose — such as after taking a course of antibiotics — I would recommend a high-strength supplement instead.”

Go dairy-free :

Non-dairy yogurts — those made with soya beans or coconut milk — can be among the most highly processed varieties, and are often laden with sugar; Alpro’s Go On Strawberry, for instance, contains two teaspoons per 100g.

However, Pearson singles out one dairy-free variety for praise. “This yogurt contains just four ingredients: coconut milk, vanilla bean paste, tapioca starch and live cultures. (The plain version contains just three — no vanilla). It’s relatively high in fat, but they are healthy fats, so that’s no bad thing as long as it’s in moderation.”

Resources:
https://www.telegraphindia.com/health/yogurt-myths-248965?ref=health-new-stry

Decoding candida infrection

The commonest fungus that affects humans belongs to the candida species. That is why the infection is called candida or thrush.

We are usually resistant to a thrush infection because of our natural immunity. Babies, the elderly and people whose immunity is compromised by HIV infection, cancer or treatment with steroids are unable to withstand the infection.

The spores thrive in the mouth, vagina, penis, and in the sweaty folds of the body – in the armpits, under the folds of the breast, in the groin and diaper areas of babies. They can grow rapidly, causing the area to become inflamed, red, scaly and itchy.

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In the mouth and vagina, thrush is visible as curdy white patches that cannot be scraped off. It makes the foreskin of the penis inflamed and cracked. There may be a foul odour. Scratching causes the organism to be deposited under the nails and transported to other areas.

Prolonged sucking on pacifiers and bottle nipples can cause micro trauma to the mucous membrane of the mouth in babies, enabling candida to get a foothold. If the infant is on antibiotics, the protective microbes in the mouth can get suppressed, causing an overgrowth of candida. The infection can occur in breast-fed infants also and may be passed back and forth from nipple to mouth.

Diapers can promote the overgrowth of candida. The diaper area may be covered with red splotches or be scaly. It can occur because the baby is left in the soiled diaper too long or the baby or mother is on antibiotics.

Local applications of anti-fungal solutions or creams are usually all that is required for the infection to clear up.

Natural probiotics (like a tablespoon of curd) on an empty stomach in the morning will help to repopulate the body with good bacteria and prevent overgrowth of fungus.

Sources:  The Telegraph (Kolkata, India)

Mindfulness Can Improve Heart Health

Research suggests a regular meditation practice could protect against heart disease.

What’s good for the mind also tends to be good for the heart:-

The mind-calming practice of meditation may play a role in reducing your risk of heart disease, according to a scientific statement published in the Sept. 28, 2017, Journal of the American Heart Association.

Experts reviewed dozens of studies published over the past two decades and found that meditation may improve a host of factors linked with heart disease — making it worth including in an overall program for ongoing heart care.

“Not only can meditation improve how your heart functions, but a regular practice can enhance your outlook on life and motivate you to maintain many heart-healthy behaviors, like following a proper diet, getting adequate sleep, and keeping up regular exercise,” says Dr. John Denninger, director of research at the Harvard-affiliated Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Moving meditations:-
Sitting and being still isn’t the only way to practice meditation. Mind-body activities like yoga and tai chi are similar to meditation in that they emphasize slow movements, controlled breathing, and mental focus. Even exercises that emphasize steady, repetitive movements, such as riding a bike, swimming laps, or walking can be a form of meditation, if you focus your brain on the task at hand.

The heart of meditation:-
Meditation involves sitting comfortably with closed eyes and focusing on your breathing, a mental image, or repetition of a single positive word or phrase. The goal is to keep your mind focused on the present and away from stressful or distracting thoughts. As your mind becomes calm, so does your body.

A meditation practice supports your heart in many ways — from changing how you cope with stress to lowering high blood pressure.

Research has found that meditation can positively affect a measure of heart health known as heart rate variability (HRV). HRV reflects how quickly your heart makes small changes in the time interval between each heartbeat. A high HRV is a sign of healthier heart. A 2013 study found that low HRV is associated with a 32% to 45% increased risk of heart attack or stroke among people without cardiovascular disease.

With regular meditation, you may be able to raise your HRV. A 2013 study found that people who did five minutes of meditation daily for 10 days had a better HRV compared with those who didn’t meditate.

A number of high-quality studies also show that meditation can modestly lower blood pressure, according to a 2013 American Heart Association scientific statement published in Hypertension. One analysis pooled results from nine studies and found that, on average, meditation lowered systolic blood pressure (the top number in a reading) by 4.7 milligrams of mercury (mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) by 3.2 mm Hg.

Take a seat:-
There are many different styles and approaches to meditation, but here is a simple routine to begin with.

* Sit quietly and close your eyes. Breathe slowly.

* Relax all of your muscles, beginning with your feet, legs, and thighs.

* Shrug your shoulders and roll your neck to the left and then right.

* On each exhalation, say the word “peace” out loud or to yourself.

When your thoughts wander (and they will), don’t get discouraged. Simply go back to repeating the pattern.

Continue for five to 10 minutes.

Thinking about a practice:-
As with any new endeavor, it takes time to learn meditation and build confidence in your ability. Dr. Denninger recommends that you begin small and give yourself space to progress at your own speed.

For example, devote just five minutes a few days per week to meditation, and then gradually increase the time and frequency until you can do it daily for up to 20 minutes. “Doing some meditation, no matter how brief, is always better than nothing,” says Dr. Denninger.

Set up a schedule to help establish a routine. Try to meditate at the same time each day, says Dr. Denninger. If you have trouble sticking to a set time, plan to do your meditation after a regular activity like brushing your teeth. “If you miss a day or two, don’t feel you have lost any progress and have to start over,” says Dr. Denninger. “Simply pick up where you left off and keep going.”

Some people find that learning and practicing meditation with a group is helpful, so you could inquire about meditation classes at yoga studios and community centers, or even follow meditation exercises online. Dr. Ronald Siegel, an assistant clinical professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School, offers free meditation exercises at www.mindfulness-solution.com.

Meditation can be yet another way to improve heart health and at the same time help ease your mind.

Resources: Harvard Health Publishing