Category Archives: Herbs & Plants

Mamoncillo.


Botanical Name: Melicoccus bijugatus
Family: Sapindaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Genus: Melicoccus
Species: M. bijugatus

Synonyms: Melicoccus bijuga L. Melicoccus carpopodea Juss. Paullinia sphaerocarpa Rich. ex Juss.

Common Names: Spanish lime, genip, guinep, genipe, ginepa, kenèp, quenepa, quenepe, quenette, chenet, talpa jocote, mamón, limoncillo, skinip, kinnip, huaya, or mamoncillo.

Local names:
It is known by many names around the growth region: mamoncillo or mamón (in Cuba, some parts of El Salvador, Costa Rica, Honduras, Colombia, Nicaragua, Panama, and Venezuela), chenette (in Trinidad and Tobago), quenette (in the French speaking islands of the Caribbean including; Guadeloupe, Marie-Galante and Martinique), gnep or ginep (in the United States Virgin Islands, Jamaica, the Cayman Islands, Antigua and Barbuda), guaya, quenepa (in Mexico and Puerto Rico), skinnip (in St. Kitts), skinup in (Grenada), kenip (in Dominica), canepa, genip, guinep, ginepa, ginnip, kinnip, kenèp (in Guyana, Haiti, Belize, Bahamas, Anguilla, Jamaica, Sint Maarten / Saint Martin, Sint Eustatius, Saba) and in some parts of Central America talpa jocote (in some parts of Guatemala and El Salvador), genepa, xenepa, kenepa (in Curaçao and Aruba), knippa (in Suriname) and Spanish lime (in the United States), and limoncillo (in the Dominican Republic). Also, it is often referred to as anoncillo in central Cuba and southern Florida. It is called “ackee” in the countries of Barbados, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, however, in the rest of the Caribbean, the latter name is used to refer to the related Blighia sapida. ((Batanes, Philippines)), Chayi and referred as kosam in chhattisgarh state of India.

Habitat: Melicoccus bijugatus is native to northern South America and naturalised in coastal and dry forest in Central America, the Caribbean and parts of the Old World tropics. It is believed to have been introduced into the Caribbean in pre-Columbian times and is also found in India. This fruit, known as quenepa in Puerto Rico, grows particularly abundantly in the municipality of Ponce, and there is a yearly celebration in that municipality known as Festival Nacional de la Quenepa (National Genip Fruit Festival). The fruit ripens during the warm summer months.

Description:
Trees can reach heights of up to 25 m (82 ft) and come with alternate, compound leaves. The leaves have four elliptic leaflets which are 5–12.5 cm (2.0–4.9 in) long and 2.5–5 cm (0.98–1.97 in) wide. They are typically dioecious plants, however polygamous trees occur from time to time. Flowers have four petals and eight stamens and produce void, green drupes which are 2.5–4 cm (0.98–1.57 in) long and 2 cm (0.79 in) wide. Their pulp is orange, salmon or yellowish in color with a somewhat juicy and pasty texture.

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Cultivation:
The species is also commonly planted along roadsides as an ornamental tree.

Health Benefits:

  • Mamoncillo is full of fiber that helps in lowering the cholesterol levels in the body and prevents constipation.
  • It also contains Vitamin A that improves the immune system and prevents from stones getting formed in the urinary system.
  • Vitamin C in quenepa acts like an antioxidant, and calcium helps in keeping the bones and teeth strong. The calcium in mamoncillo also helps prevent cancer.
  • Phosphorous in this fruit is good for digestion and in regulating hormones.
  • Quenepa also contains tryptophan, which is said to be good for your sleep, and lysine that helps in proper growth and also helps prevent herpes.
  • It helps lower the blood pressure, and is quite beneficial for people with asthma.
  • Since it contains antioxidants, they help in preventing cardiovascular diseases and stroke, and boosts the immune system.
  • Being low in fat and cholesterol, it is helpful for those who are trying to lose weight.
  • The leaves of mamoncillo tree can be boiled and made into tea that is extremely good for intestinal problems.
  • Quenepa seeds when roasted, crushed, and mixed with honey helps in controlling diarrhea.
  • The leaves of the tree can be scattered in the house to keep away the fleas.

Cautions:
Make sure that the Mamoncillo fruits you have is ripe, as the raw ones may contain some toxins. There’s a potential hazard of choking in small children because of the large seeds. The large seeds can be cooked and eaten. The roasted seeds are also used as a substitute for cassava flour in baking in South America. So, these were some benefits of the sweet and delicious Mamoncillo fruit.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melicoccus_bijugatus
https://pfaf.org/user/DatabaseSearhResult.aspx
https://nutrineat.com/benefits-nutritional-facts-of-mamoncillo-fruit

Rambutan


Botanical Name: Nephelium lappaceum
Family: Sapindaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Genus: Nephelium
Species: N. lappaceum

Synonyms: Nephelium glabrum Cambess. Nephelium obovatum Ridely. Nephelium sufferugineum Radlk.

Common Names: Rambutan. Hairy Lychee
(The name “rambutan” is derived from the Malay word rambut meaning “hair”, a reference to the numerous hairy protuberances of the fruit, together with the noun-building suffix -an. Similarly, in Vietnam, it is called chôm chôm (meaning “messy hair”)

Habitat : The rambutan is native to the Indonesian region, and other regions of tropical Southeast Asia. It is closely related to several other edible tropical fruits including the lychee, longan, and mamoncillo.

Description:
Rambutan tree is an evergreen tree growing to a height of 12–20 m. The leaves are alternate, 10–30 cm long, pinnate, with three to 11 leaflets, each leaflet 5–15 cm wide and 3–10 cm broad, with an entire margin. The flowers are small, 2.5–5 mm, apetalous, discoidal, and borne in erect terminal panicles 15–30 cm wide.

Rambutan trees can be male (producing only staminate flowers and, hence, produce no fruit), female (producing flowers that are only functionally female), or hermaphroditic (producing flowers that are female with a small percentage of male flowers).

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The fruit is a round to oval single-seeded berry, 3–6 cm (rarely to 8 cm) long and 3–4 cm broad, borne in a loose pendant cluster of 10–20 together. The leathery skin is reddish (rarely orange or yellow), and covered with fleshy pliable spines, hence the name, which means ‘hairs’. Furthermore, the spines (also known as spinterns) contribute to the transpiration of the fruit and can lead to affecting fruit quality.

The fruit flesh, which is actually the aril, is translucent, whitish or very pale pink, with a sweet, mildly acidic flavor very reminiscent of grapes.

The single seed is glossy brown, 1–1.3 cm, with a white basal scar. Soft and containing equal portions of saturated and unsaturated fats,[8] the seeds may be cooked and eaten. The peeled fruits can be eaten raw, or cooked and eaten: first, the grape-like fleshy aril, then the nutty seed, with no waste.

Health Benefits:
Neutricianal Value: Rambutan fruit contains diverse nutrients but in modest amounts, with only manganese having moderate content at 16 percent of the Daily Value per 100 g consumed (right table; note data are for canned fruit in syrup, not as raw which may have different nutrient contents)

As an unpigmented fruit flesh, rambutan does not contain significant polyphenol content, but its colorful rind displays diverse phenolic acids, such as syringic, coumaric, gallic, caffeic, and ellagic acids having antioxidant activity in vitro.[19][20] Rambutan seeds contain equal proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, where arachidic (34%) and oleic (42%) acids, respectively, are highest in fat content.

The pleasant fragrance of rambutan fruit derives from numerous volatile organic compounds, including beta-damascenone, vanillin, phenylacetic acid, and cinnamic acid

Rambutan has a very high B3, amounting to 1352 mg. At 1950s, vitamin B3 is used to heart attack prevention therapy and lower cholesterol levels. Men should consume 15-19 mg per day, Women about of 15-18 mg per day, while for children 9-13mg daily.

As the fruit has good amount of Vitamin B3 & vitamin C it has thousands of health benefits that we get by eating this.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rambutan
https://pfaf.org/user/DatabaseSearhResult.aspx
https://drhealthbenefits.com/food-bevarages/fruits/health-benefits-of-rambutan

Dragonfruit

Botanical Name: Hylocereus undatus
Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Hylocereus
Species: H. undatus

Common names:
English: pitahaya, dragon fruit, night blooming cereus, strawberry pear, Belle of the Night, Cinderella plant, Jesus in the cradle
Estonian: maasik-metskaktus
Finnish: pitaija, lohikäärmehedelmä
French: pitaya, fruit du dragon, cierge-lézard, poire de chardon
German: Drachenfrucht, Distelbirne
Greek: ?????? ??? ?????? (fruto tu draku)
Hawaiian: panini-o-ka-puna-hou (“Punahou cactus”) – a famous specimen still grows at Punahou School
Japanese: pitaya (???), dragon fruit (????????),
Portuguese: pitaia, cato-barse, cardo-ananaz, rainha da noite
Spanish: pitahaya roja (Costa Rica, Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela); flor de caliz, pitajava (Puerto Rico); junco, junco tapatio, pitahaya orejona, reina de la noche, tasajo (Mexico)
Swedish: skogskaktus, röd pitahaya
Vietnamese: thanh long
Thai:kaeo mangkon
Malay: buah naga. pronounce:boo-ah naa-gaa
Chinese: pinyin: hu?lónggu?
Italian: Pitahaya, Frutto del Drago
Bengali: Dragon fal.
Lithuanian: kertuotis

Habitat :
The native origin of Dragonfruit has never been resolved.It is lithophytic or hemiepiphytic. It is widely distributed through the tropics in cultivation. Like all true cacti, the genus originates in the Americas, the precise origin of the dragogfruit may be a hybrid.

Description:
Dragonfruit is a sprawling or vining, terrestrial or epiphytic cactus. They climb by use of aerial roots and can reach a height 10 meters or more growing on rocks and trees. The genus is very variable and closely related to Selenicereus.
The stems are scandent (climbing habit), creeping, sprawling or clambering, and branch profusely. There can be 4-7 of them, between 5 and 10 m or longer, with joints from 30–120 cm or longer, and 10–12 cm thick; with generally three ribs; margins are corneous (horn-like) with age, and undulate.

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Areoles, that is, the small area bearing spines or hairs on a cactus, are 2 mm across with internodes 1–4 cm. Spines on the adult branches are 1-3, 2–4 mm long, being acicular (needle-like) to almost conical, and grayish brown to black in colour and spreading, with a deep green epidermis.

The scented, nocturnal flowers are 25–30 cm long, 15–17 cm wide with the pericarpel 2.5–5 cm long, about 2.5 cm thick, bracteoles ovate, acute, to 2.5 to less than 4 cm long; receptacle about 3 cm thick, bracteoles are linear-lanceolate, 3–8 cm long; outer tepals lanceolate-linear to linear, acuminate (tapering to a point), being 10–15 cm long, 10–15 mm wide and mucronate (ending in a short sharp point). Their colour is greenish-yellow or whitish, rarely rose-tinged; inner tepals are lanceolate (tapering to a point at the tip) to oblanceolate (i.e. more pointed at the base), up to 10–15 cm long about 40 mm wide at widest point, and mucronate, unbroken, sharp to acuminate (pointed), and white. Stamens 5–10 cm long, are declinate, inserted in one continuous zone from throat to 35 mm above the pericarpel and cream. The style (bearing the stigma) to 17, they are 5-24.5 cm long, stout, 6–8 mm thick, cream, and up to 26 stigma lobes, they can be whole or sometimes split at the top, cream, about 25 mm long. Nectar chambers are 30 mm long.

The fruit is oblong to oval, 6–12 cm long, 4–9 cm thick, red with large bracteoles, with white pulp and edible black seeds….CLICK & SEE

Health Benefits :
Some studies have already been conducted to determine if dragon fruit plays a role in improving overall health and well-being. One example is a 2011 study from the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, where researchers assessed the relationship between a healthy diet containing fruits and vegetables, lifetime physical activity and oxidative DNA damage linked to prostate cancer .

Dragon fruit contains a surprising number of phytonutrients.6 It is also loaded with antioxidants,7 and is home to carotene, protein, vitamin C (said to be near 10 percent of the daily recommended value), polyunsaturated (good) fatty acids and B vitamins that may be needed for carbohydrate metabolism .8,9 In addition, this tropical fruit doesn’t contain complex carbohydrates, which may allow vitamin B1 (thiamin) along with other B vitamins in the body to break down food more easily in the body.10

The dragon fruit is also a source of other nutrients like calcium that may help develop strong bones and teeth, iron that may assist in forming healthy red blood cells, and phosphorus to aid in promoting tissue and cell growth, maintenance and repair.11,12

A phytochemical called captin is present in dragon fruit too. It is typically used in medicines that may help alleviate heart problems. Other known benefits of dragon fruit include boosting the immune system, promoting quicker recovery from wounds and bruises, and reducing the risk for respiratory problems.13

Eating dragon fruit may also help the body maintain its normal function by helping eliminate toxic heavy metals14 and improving eyesight.15 Lycopene, responsible for the fruit’s red color ,16 has been linked with a lower prostate cancer risk.17 Meanwhile,

seed extracts from dragon fruit are high in polyunsaturated fats (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids)18 that may help reduce triglyceride levels19 and lower the risk of cardiovascular disorders.20 In some cases, oil derived from the seeds may serve as a mild laxative too.21

Caution:
Make sure to consume dragon fruit in moderation because it contains fructose, a type of sugar that may be harmful to your health if consumed in excessive amounts.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hylocereus_undatus
https://foodfacts.mercola.com/dragon-fruit.html

Tacoma Flower

Botanical Name: Tecoma stans
Family: Bignoniaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Genus: Tecoma
Species:T. stans

Common Names: Yellow trumpetbush, Yellow bells, Yellow elder, Ginger-thomas.

Hindi Names: Pillya, Sonapati

Habitat: Tacoma plant is native to S. America – Argentina north to the Caribbean and through Central America to southern N. America. Tecoma stans is the official flower of the United States Virgin Islands and the floral emblem of The Bahamas. It prefers to grows on dry and disturbed areas such as roadsides but it can also be found in relatively undisturbed forests.

Description:
Tacoma is a fast-growing shrub or small tree that can reach a height of 5 – 8 metres.It is often grown as an ornamental plant by virtue of its many yellow trumpet-shaped, scented flowers. It has sharply toothed, pinnate green leaves and bears large, showy, bright golden yellow trumpet-shaped flowers. It is drought-tolerant and grows well in warm climates. The flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. The plant produces pods containing yellow seeds with papery wings. The plant is desirable fodder when it grows in fields grazed by livestock. Yellow trumpetbush is a ruderal species, readily colonizing disturbed, rocky, sandy, and cleared land and occasionally becoming an invasive weed.

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it is also sometimes cultivated for its medicinal virtues, as a hedge and to provide shade.

Propagation:
Seed – does not require pre-treatment. The seed, which germinates easily, can be sown in nursery beds or in containers. Seedlings require 3 – 4 months in the nursery, after which they can be directly planted out.
Seed storage behaviour is orthodox, and seeds can be stored for long periods under ideal conditions.
Regeneration by cuttings is also possible.

Medicinal Uses:

Parts Used for herbal uses: leaves,flowers,root and seeds.
Herbs made from tacoma stans for cancer, respetory problems,stomach ache,snake bites and scorpion sting.
The flowers are diuretic.
A leaf infusion can be taken orally for treating diabetes and stomach pains.
A strong leaf and root decoction is taken orally as a diuretic, to treat syphilis or for intestinal worms.

Other Uses:
The light brown wood is hard and very durable. It is used in cabinet making, turnery, to make tools, and in the construction of buildings[303
Trees provide firewood and charcoal.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tecoma_stans
https://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Tecoma-Stans-Cid4451
http://tropical.theferns.info/viewtropical.php?id=Tecoma+stans

Mullaca

Botanical Name : Physalis angulata
Family: Solanaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Solanales
Genus: Physalis
Species: P. angulata

Synonyms: Physalis capsicifolia, Physalis lanceifolia, Physalis ramosissima.

Common Names: English common names include: angular winter cherry, balloon cherry, cutleaf groundcherry, gooseberry, hogweed, wild tomato, camapu, and occasionally other common names for the genus Physalis.In Malayalam it is known as njottanjodiyan and mottaampuli.

Alternative Names:
Bolsa Mullaca, Battre-Autour, Camapu, Cape Gooseberry, Capulí Cimarrón, Cecendet, Dumadu Harachan, Hog Weed, Juá-De-Capote, Mullaca, Nvovo, Polopa, Saca-Buche, Topatop, Thongtheng, Tino-Tino, Urmoa Batoto Bita, Wapotok.

Habitat : . It is native to the Americas, but is now widely distributed and naturalized in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide

Description:
Mullaca or Physalis angulata is an erect, herbaceous, annual plant belonging to the nightshade family Solanaceae. It reproduces by seed. Its leaves are dark green and roughly oval, often with tooth shapes around the edge. The flowers are five-sided and pale yellow; the yellow-orange fruits are born inside a balloon-like calyx. It is native to the Americas, but is now widely distributed and naturalized in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide.

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MULLACA PLANT

Medicinal Used of Mullaca Power:
It is helpful in the treatment of arthritis. • Use of mullaca powder is believed to help patients having gout. • Physalis angulata is also believed to have diuretic effects. Therefore, it is also used for the treatment of conditions pertaining to bladder and kidney. • It is also used as a blood thinner. • It is considered an immunity booster. • Mullaca is believed to have anti-bacterial and anti-viral effects. • Spasms are often treated with the use of mullaca powder.

TRIBAL AND HERBAL MEDICINE USES:
Mullaca has long held a place in natural medicine in the tropical countries where it grows. Its use by rainforest Indians in the Amazon is well documented, and its edible sweet-tart fruits are enjoyed by many rainforest inhabitants, animal and human alike. Indigenous tribes in the Amazon use a leaf infusion as a diuretic. Some Colombian tribes believe the fruits and leaves have narcotic properties and also decoct them as an anti-inflammatory and disinfectant for skin diseases; others use a leaf tea for asthma. Indigenous peoples in the Peruvian Amazon use the leaf juice internally and externally for worms and the leaves and/or roots for earache, liver problems, malaria, hepatitis, and rheumatism. Indigenous tribes in the Brazilian Amazon use the sap of the plant for earaches and the roots for jaundice. Mullaca has also been used by indigenous peoples for female disorders. In the Solomon Islands, the fruit of mullaca is decocted and taken internally to promote fertility. A tea is made of the entire plant and/or the leaves in the West Indies and Jamaica to prevent miscarriages. In Peru the leaf is infused and used to treat postpartum infections.

Mullaca is employed in herbal medicine systems today in both Peru and Brazil. In Peruvian herbal medicine the plant is called mullaca or bolsa mullaca. To treat diabetes, the roots of three mullaca plants are sliced and macerated in 1/4 liter of rum for seven days. Honey is added, and 1/2 glass of this medicine is taken twice daily for 60 days. In addition, an infusion of the leaves is recommended as a good diuretic, and an infusion of the roots is used to treat hepatitis. For asthma and malaria, the dosage is 1 cup of tea made from the aerial parts of the plant. In Brazilian herbal medicine the plant is employed for chronic rheumatism, for skin diseases and dermatitis, as a sedative and diuretic, for fever and vomiting, and for many types of kidney, liver, and gallbladder problems.

PLANT CHEMICALS:
Phytochemical studies on mullaca reveal that it contains many types of biologically active, naturally occurring chemicals including flavonoids, alkaloids, and many different types of plant steroids, some of which have never before been seen in science. Mullaca has been the subject of recent clinical research (which is still ongoing), based on the preliminary studies showing that it is an effective immune stimulant, is toxic to numerous types of cancer and leukemia cells, and that it has antimicrobial properties. The new steroids found in mullaca have received the most attention, and many of the documented anti-cancerous, anti-tumorous and anti-leukemic actions are attributed to these steroids.

Various extracts of mullaca, as well as these extracted plant steroids called physalins, have shown strong in vitro and in vivo (mice) activity against numerous types of human and animal cancer cells including lung, colon, nasopharynx, liver, cervix, melanoma and glioma (brain) cancer cells. This cancer research began in the early 1980s with researchers in Thailand and the U.S. and was verified with research performed at the University of Taiwan in 1992 (where they demonstrated a significant effect against five human cancer cell lines and three animal cancer cell lines). Then in 2001, researchers at the University of Houston isolated yet another new chemical in mullaca which demonstrated remarkable toxicity against nasopharynx cancer cells, lung (adenocarcinoma) cancer cells as well as leukemia in mice. The same Taiwanese researchers had already published a separate study on mullaca’s other anti-leukemic phytochemicals in 1992, reporting that two physalin chemicals inhibited the growth of five types of acute leukemia, including lymphoid (T & B), promyelocytic, myeloid and monocytic.

Other researchers in China and Russia independently demonstrated significant immunomodulatory effects against blastogenesis (a process triggered in leukemia) while boosting other immune functions which might account for the anti-leukemic effects in mice seen by other researchers. With tumor cells, research suggests that several of the steroidal chemicals in mullaca act on an enzyme level to arrest the normal cell cycle in cancer cells as well as cause DNA damage inside of cancer cells (making them unable to replicate).

The main plant chemicals isolated in mullaca thus far include: ayanin, chlorogenic acid, choline, ixocarpanolide, myricetin, phygrine, physagulin A thru G, physalin A thru K, physangulide, sitosterol, vamonolide, withaminimin, withangulatin A, withanolide D, withanolide T, and withaphysanolide.

BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND CLINICAL RESEARCH:

In addition to mullaca’s anticancerous and antileukemic actions, several research groups have confirmed mullaca’s antibacterial and antiviral activity. Most recently in 2002 and 2000, mullaca was shown to be active in vitro against several strains of mycobacteriums and mycoplasmas (both very stubborn types of bacteria which are not widely susceptible to standard antibiotics). In addition to these actions, mullaca has demonstrated effective antibacterial properties in vitro against numerous types of gram positive and gram negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. Other research groups in Japan have been focusing on mullaca’s antiviral actions and preliminary studies show that it is active in vitro against Polio virus I, Herpes simplex virus I, the measles virus, and HIV-I – demonstrating reverse transcriptase inhibitory effects.

Mullaca has also been reported to reduce spasms in guinea pigs, lower blood pressure in cats and to contract isotonic muscles in toads. In the test tube, mullaca was shown to have an anticoagulant effect. Western scientists did somewhat validate the indigenous use for diabetes when they reported a mild hypoglycemic effect in mice fed a water extract of the root. One must wonder what the results would have been if they had followed native customs and employed an alcohol extract instead.

CURRENT PRACTICAL USES:
Interestingly enough, much of the clinical research has ignored the local and indigenous uses of the plant; thus, many of its effective uses in herbal medicine remain unexplained. Its tested antibacterial properties could validate its use as a antiseptic and disinfectant for skin diseases and its use to treat gonorrhea. Its antiviral properties could well explain its long history of use for hepatitis, although scientists have not tested it specifically against hepatitis. Possibly the antispasmodic and muscle contractive properties documented for mullaca might explain its widespread use for asthma and female disorders as well. Yet its widespread use throughout the rainforests for malaria and fevers remains unexplained by science.

Herbal practitioners in both South and North America today rely on mullaca for various bacterial and viral infections as well as a complementary therapy for cancer and leukemia. Although not widely available here in the U.S., it is found as an ingredient in various herbal formulas and in bulk supplies. The animal studies conducted to date indicate no toxicity at any of the dosages used indicating that is a safe natural remedy.

Precautions:
Nothing can be said about the safety of Physalis angulata (Mullaca) due to the shortage of reliable information. Lactation and Pregnancy – Nursing and pregnant females should avoid the use of mullaca powder because there is lack of information that could support the safety of use of this herb during lactation or pregnancy.

Side Effects :
The herbalists from both North and South America depend on the use of mullaca powder for the preparation of a number of anti-viral, anti-bacterial and a wide variety of complementary medicines used for the treatment of cancers and leukemia. Although pure isolated Physalis angulata is not very easily available in the US, but still it is found as a component of countless herbal preparations. Generally it is considered very safe and no serious side effects have been reported so far with the use of mullaca containing products.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physalis_angulata
http://www.amazondiscovery.com/products/mullaca-powder/
http://www.rain-tree.com/mullaca.htm