Categories
Herbs & Plants

Acer oblongifolium

Botanical Name : Acer oblongifolium
Family: Sapindaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Sapindales
Genus: Acer

Synonyms:
*Acer albopurpurascens Hayata
*Acer buzimpala Buch.-Ham. ex D.Don
*Acer hypoleucum Hayata
*Acer itoanum (Hayata) H.L.Li
*Acer laikuanii Ling
*Acer lanceolatum Molliard

Common Names: Himalayan maple, Evergreen maple and Kashmir maple

Habitat:
Acer oblongum is native to central, eastern, and southeastern Asia, (from Tibet and northern India east as far as Japan, including southern China, and northern Indochina.) It grows under humid climate of the Himalayan forests, especially along streams, at an elevation of about 600–2,000 metres (2,000–6,600 ft) above sea level.

Description:
Acer oblongum is a medium-sized evergreen to semi-deciduous tree reaching a height of approximately 15–22 metres (49–72 ft). Unique among maples, this plant stays green all winter. The trunks are buttressed, with a smooth to wrinkled bark. Leaves are opposite, ovate-lanceolate with entire margin, with a petiole 5–12 cm long, with glaucous-green underside and dark green upperside. The young shoots are reddish bronze and finely hairy. The flowers are hermaphroditic, small and inconspicuous, about 4 mm, greenish white, gathered in hairy racemes. The fruits are represented by the typical two-winged samaras, about 2.5 cm long, wind dispersed. It has been introduced for its wood and it is sometimes cultivated in large gardens for its evergreen foliage.

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Cultivation:
Acer oblongum is found in the warm temperate zone to the subtropics, usually at elevations above 600 metres. It succeeds in areas of the temperate zone that experience mild winters with few, short-lived frosts – forms from the northern part of its range in China are usually more tolerant of colder winters[. Of easy cultivation, it prefers a good moist well-drained soil. in a sunny position but tolerates some shade. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Chlorosis can sometimes develop as a result of iron deficiency when the plants are grown in alkaline soils, but in general maples are not fussy as to soil pH. This species is found on acid soils in the wild. Most maples are bad companion plants, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants.


Propagation:
Through Seeds – best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame, it usually germinates in the following spring. Pre-soak stored seed for 24 hours and then stratify for 2 – 4 months at 1 – 8°c. It can be slow to germinate. The seed can be harvested ‘green’ (when it has fully developed but before it has dried and produced any germination inhibitors) and sown immediately. It should germinate in late winter. If the seed is harvested too soon it will produce very weak plants or no plants at all. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on until they are 20cm or more tall before planting them out in their permanent positions.
Layering, which takes about 12 months, is successful with most species in this genus.
Cuttings of young shoots in early summer . The cuttings should have 2 – 3 pairs of leaves, plus one pair of buds at the base. Remove a very thin slice of bark at the base of the cutting, rooting is improved if a rooting hormone is used. The rooted cuttings must show new growth during the summer before being potted up otherwise they are unlikely to survive the winter.
If seed is unavailable, the plant can be grafted onto A. buergerianum.

Medicinal Uses: Cytotoxic, antibacterial, anti-tumour and antifungal activities are known. Several species of Acer genera are used traditionally in the treat- ment of cancer, polio, and dysentery (Moerman, 1998).

Other Uses:
The leaves of Acer oblongifolium , when laid in layers between crops such as apples, carrots and potatoes, have a preservative effect.
The wood is close grained, moderately hard. It is used for agricultural implements, minor construction, cups etc.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acer_oblongum
https://temperate.theferns.info/plant/Acer+oblongum

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Salvia nubicola

Botanical Name: Salvia nubicola
Family: Lamiaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Genus: Salvia
Species: S. nubicola

Synonyms: Salvia glutinosa subsp.

Common Names: Himalayan Yellow Sage, Himalayan Cloud Sage

Habitat: Salvia nubicola is native to a wide region that includes Afghanistan, Bhutan, India, Pakistan, southwest Asia, and Europe. The plant grows at elevations of 2,000 to 4,300 m (6,600 to 14,100 ft) in dry forests, often with Pinus wallichiana, typically growing in large colonies in woodland clearings. It is especially common in the Muktinath Valley, and is used in traditional Tibetan medicine.

Description:
Salvia nubicola is a herbaceous perennial plant . It reaches 3 ft (0.91 m) high and wide, growing upright, with fresh-green colored leaves that are triangular shaped, with the largest, approximately 5 in (13 cm), growing at the base of the plant. The petiole is typically about the same length as the leaf blade. The plant puts out numerous 10 in (25 cm) long inflorescences holding pale yellow flowers, in whorls of two to six, that have finely spotted maroon markings on the upper lip.[2] The calyx is bright green, hairy, sticky, and glandular, giving off a medicinal odor when rubbed, described by one author as “resembling the distinct odour of a billy-goat,” all of which cause animals to avoid it in its native habitat.

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Cultivation:
Salvia nubicola is perfect grown in a woodland setting under a deciduous tree. As this species is taller than many of the other varieties, it is best planted in the garden in a dappled shade or a sunny protected position. Plant with other small shrubs, bulbs and perennials that appreciate similar growing conditions.
*Add a 2-inch layer of mulch around the plant to retain moisture and control weeds.
*Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. …
*Salvia really doesn’t need feeding during the season.
*To encourage continuous blooms throughout the season, deadhead spent flowers periodically.

Propagation:
Usually by tip cuttings/ new shoots taken in late spring before the flower stems appear. Seed is also an option, sowing fresh seed to get better results with germination.

Medicinal Uses:Salvia nubicola has been used for the treatment of different kinds of disorders including seizure, ulcers, gout, rheumatism, inflammation, dizziness, tremor, paralysis, diarrhea, and hyperglycemia.
(Antioxidant, Cytotoxic, and Anti-cancerous activities are recently identified.)

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_nubicola
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1JZAP_enIN944IN944&sxsrf=ALiCzsbQBkCJ-RZSlpbRPO4x7FFSG27fcA:1669264514678&q=Salvia+medicinal+uses&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiMzbvz_sX7AhURRmwGHTWEDxAQ1QJ6BAghEAE&biw=1280&bih=577&dpr=1.5

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Euphorbia wallichii

Botanical Name : Euphorbia wallichii
Family: Euphorbiaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Malpighiales
Genus: Euphorbia
Species: E. wallichii

Common Names: Wallich Spurge, Himalayan Spurge
Habitat: Euphorbia wallichii is native to Asia – Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, India, Nepal, Laos. It grows on alpine meadows, slopes, forest margins; at elevations from 1,800 – 4,700 metres.

Description:
E. wallichii is a clump-forming, herbaceous perennial plant with erect stems, linear, dark green leaves with white midribs and purple-tinted margins,which is perfect to brighten any border. It typically grows up to 24 in. tall and wide (60 cm) . It produces exceptionally eye-catching clusters of bright yellow cupped flowers with orange stamens in mid-spring which last for months . Its one to several few-branched basally stems up to 100cm tall.
The plant is harvested from the wild for local use as a medicine. It has been shown to be an effective antibiotic.

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Cultivation:
*Choosing a Variety Pick silver-leafed euphorbia for good drainage. Silver-leaved …
*Propagating Your Plant Prepare well-draining soil in a pot for circulation. …
*Caring Routinely for Euphorbia Prune your euphorbia regularly. Euphorbia …

Propagation: Through seeds.

Medicinal Uses:
Euphorbia wallichii is an herb. The parts of the plant that grow above the ground are used to make medicine. Euphorbia is used for breathing disorders including asthma, bronchitis, and chest congestion. It is also used for mucus in the nose and throat, throat spasms, hay fever, and tumors. Some people use it to cause vomiting. In India, it is also used for treating worms, severe diarrhea (dysentery), gonorrhea, and digestive problems. The root is used traditionally in the treatment of skin problems. Research has shown that the plant is an effective antimicrobial.

Other Uses: People prefers to grow the plant in flower garden for beautifivation. It is a fascinating and long lasting plant to grow. Since they come in so many different sizes and colors you can find an option to match your home. They are popular as indoor plants, but do great as outdoor as well.


Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.


Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euphorbia_wallichii
https://temperate.theferns.info/plant/Euphorbia+wallichii
https://www.emedicinehealth.com/euphorbia/vitamins-supplements.htm

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Rhazyastricta

Botanical Name: Rhazyastricta
Family: Apocynaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales
Genus: Rhazya

Habitat: Rhazyastricta is a native poisonous plant in Southern Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Iraq, Oman, Yemen, and Saudi Arabia.

Description:
The plant is an evergreen dwarf shrub. It produces a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) some of which possess important pharmacological properties. However, the yields of these compounds are very low. Establishment of a reliable, reproducible and efficient transformation method and induction of hairy roots system is a vital prerequisite for application of biotechnology in order to improve secondary metabolite yields. In the present review, recent biotechnological attempts and advances in TIAs production through transformed hairy root cultures in R. stricta are reviewed to draw the attention to its metabolic engineering potential.

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Cultivation:
Provide the right amount of sunlight. Plants generally need either full sunlight, partial sunlight, or partial shade. This relatively simple distinction has a big impact on how …
Water the plants only as often as needed. Watering can cause perfectly lovely people to become serial plant killers. They either water too little or too much. Many first …
Fertilize. Most avid plant growers use some sort of fertilizer, but that’s a matter of preference. If you choose to use fertilizer, visit your local greenhouse and ask …

Medicinal Uses:
Rhazyastricta is a medicinal plant used in folk medicine to treat diseases such as diabetes mellitus, fever, sore throat, and syphilis (Adam, 1998; El-Ghonemy, 1993). It’s used in the treatment of diseases like boils, eruptions, red sore, infected and swollen eyes, skin rashes, colic and stomach pain etc.

Anti-cancerous and Allelopathic activities are known. Locally diabetic patients drink its leaves water extract.

Known Hazards: Rhazyastricta is a highly poisonous plant.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhazya_stricta
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10529-017-2320-7

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Withania coagulans

Botanical Name: Withania coagulans
Family: Solanaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Solanales
Genus: WithaniaDescription:
Species: W. coagulans

Synonyms: Puneeria coagulans Stocks

Common Names: Sanskrit: Rishyagandha, Tamil: Panneer ilai chedi, Hindi: Paneer phool

Habitat:
Withania coagulans is native to Afghanistan, Pakistan and the Indian subcontinent. Within the genus Withania, W. somnifera (Ashwagandha) and W. coagulans (Paneer booti/Ashutosh booti) are economically significant, and are cultivated in several regions for their use in Ayurveda. It is claimed to help control diabetes.

Description:
Withania coagulans . is a dense, hairy, erect, grayish-tomentose herb or under-shrub, grows up to a height of 1.5 meter. Its all parts are covered with whitish, stellate trichomes.Branching is extensive; leaves are simple, alternate or sub-opposite, ovate, entire, basis cunate, 10 cm long. The roots are stout, long tuberous, fleshy, whitish-brown. The flowers are greenish-yellow and found in few flowered clusters in axils; pedicels up to 4 mm long. Calyx is 5 mm long and stellately tomentose; teeth 2.5 mm long, linear, acute and form a deltoid base. Corolla is 8 mm long, divided rather more than ½ – way down; lobes lanceolate, acute and pubescent outside. Filaments are 3 mm long, slender, glabrous and anthers are broadly elliptic (almost orbicular), 1.25 mm long. Ovary and style are glabrous.
The fruit is red-yellow berry, smooth, 6 mm in diameter, enclosed in the inflated calyx which reaches more than 25 mm diameter and is globose, slightly 5-angled, pointed with the connivent calyx-teeth and scurfy- pubescent outside. Seeds are 2.5 mm in diameter, yellow and somewhat scurfy.

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Cultivation :
Withania coagulans is grown on sub-marginal waste lands and low fertility areas. Plant grows well in red, sandy, black and loamy soil with pH 6.5- 8.0 with good water drainage. It can be cultivated upto an altitudes of 1000 meter. The plant prefers a sub-tropical climate. The semitropical areas receiving 500-750 mm rainfall are suitable for cultivation of this crop. The crop requires dry season during the growing period. Temperature between 20° C to 35° C is most suitable for its cultivation. Late winter rains are conducive for the proper development of the plant roots.
Propagation: Through seeds.


Medicinal Uses:
*The drug is rejuvenating agent; mainly used in Ayurvedic and Unani preparations.
*The plant has anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, fungicidal, anthelmintic, anti-convulsant, anti-stress, immunomodulatory and anti-pyretic properties.
*It is also used in insomnia, weakness, ulcers and painful swellings as aphrodisiac and in leucoderma.
*The paste prepared out of its leaves is used for curing inflammation of tubercular glands and that of its roots for curing skin diseases, bronchitis, ulcer and dyspepsia and eye diseases.
*The fruits and seeds of Ashwagandha are diuretic in nature.
*The leaves are reported to contain anthelmintic and febrifuge properties.

  • An infusion of the bark is given for asthma.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Withania_coagulans#:~:text=Withania%20coagulans%20%28Sanskrit%3A%20Rishyagandha%2C%20Tamil%3A%20Panneer%20ilai%20chedi%2C,to%20Afghanistan%2C%20Pakistan%20and%20the%20Indian%20subcontinent.%20
https://vikaspedia.in/agriculture/crop-production/package-of-practices/medicinal-and-aromatic-plants/tribulus-terrestris-1

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