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Herbs & Plants

Himatanthus sucuuba

Botanical Name: Himatanthus sucuuba
Family: Apocynaceae
Subfamily: Rauvolfioideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales
Tribe: Plumerieae
Subtribe: Plumeriinae
Genus: Himatanthus

Synonyms: Plumeria sucuuba Spruce

Common Name: Plumeria sucuuba

Habitat: Himatanthus sucuuba is native to S. America – Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, the Guyanas; C. America – Panama. It grows in the rainforests, in both dense primary and the more open, secondary growth areas; favouring deep, well-drained sandy or loamy soils and avoiding areas subject to periodic inundation.

Description:
Himatanthus sucuuba is an evergreen tree with a narrowly pyramidal crown and a straight, cylindrical bole of up to 40 cm in diameter. It grows about 8-16 m tall and can be found across South America where it is a known medicinal plant.

Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.
Grows best in a sunny position. Requires a well-drained soil. Grows best in a deep, sandy to loamy soil. Established plants are drought tolerant. Young plants have a moderate rate of growth. The plant can flower all year round

Medicinal Uses:
Himatanthus sucuuba is a well respected and widely used medicinal plant in herbal medicine systems in the Amazon and South America; many of its traditional uses have been explained and verified by research. It is mainly used for treating pain and inflammation related to many conditions; cancerous tumours, and as a broad spectrum antimicrobial for various internal and external infections. Although toxic in larger doses, toxicity studies indicate that the use of the plant at traditional dosages is non-toxic. There have been no toxic, abortive, or birth defects reported. The plant contains several medically active compounds. An antitumor iridoid compound and two depsides showing inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) have been isolated from the bark. In addition, two iridoid chemicals called plumericin and isoplumericin have been found in the bark and the latex. These two chemicals have been reported with cytotoxic, anticancer, antifungal and antibacterial actions in laboratory research. An extract of the bark has been shown to provide significant protection from ulcers and to reduce gastric hypersecretion through several novel mechanisms of actions. The latex has shown significant anti-inflammatory and pain relieving actions. The latex can exert anti-inflammatory effects even in the acute phase of the inflammatory process. This action has been attributed to the cinnamate chemicals that are found in the latex and bark. The bark has been shown to be significantly cytotoxic to five different human cancer cell lines, which may help explain why the tree has been used against cancer and tumours for many years in South America. This anti-cancerous action is probably related to the iridoids and triterpenoids in the tree bark. Research has shown that the bark has a greater antifungal effect than a control drug (nistatin) that was used – this action has been attributed to the triterpenic esters found in the bark. The plants effectiveness in treating infected wounds, candida, tuberculosis, syphilis, and even mange might be explained by the documented antimicrobial actions of the bark and latex. The plant’s use in the treatment of asthma might be explained by the smooth-muscle relaxant actions documented in 2005 by Brazilian researchers working with a bark extract. The bark and the latex are considered analgesic, antiinflammatory, antirheumatic, antitumor, antifungal, anthelmintic, aphrodisiac, astringent, blood purifier, emmenagogue, emollient, febrifuge, laxative, purgative, tonic, vermifuge and vulnerary. A decoction of the bark is taken internally in the treatment of rheumatism, stomach aches and body aches and pain. Applied externally, the powdered tree bark is sprinkled directly onto stubborn wounds and sores. The latex is placed in warm water which is used to bathe the part of the body suffering from arthritis, pain and/or inflammation. The latex is also put directly onto abscesses, sores, wounds, rashes and skin ulcers. It is rubbed on to bot-fly bites in order to suffocate and kill the larvae under the skin (in both animals and humans. Both bark and latex are also used in the treatment of lymphatic gland diseases and inflammation; female disorders such as endometriosis, uterine fibroid tumours, menstrual irregularities and pain, ovarian cysts and ovarian inflammation; cancerous tumours and skin cancers; digestion problems such as indigestion, stomach aches, bowel inflammation and gastric ulcers; coughs, fevers, headaches, asthma and other lung disorders.

Other Uses:
A latex is obtained from wounds in the bark and stems. Although toxic, it is used medicinally in small quantities. The wood is medium-textured, moderately heavy, soft, with poor mechanical properties and not very durable. Easy to work with, it is used for various internal purposes including scantlings, beams, laths and various kinds of boards for partitions; it is also used for making boxes, tool handles and toys. The wood is used for fuel and to make charcoa.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himatanthus
https://pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Himatanthus+sucuuba

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Herbs & Plants

Hieracium umbellatum

Botanical Name:Hieracium umbellatum
Family: Asteraceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Cichorieae
Genus: Hieracium
Species: H. umbellatum

Synonyms:
*Hieracium vulgatum
*Hieracium kalmii L.
*Hieracium umbellatum L.
*Hieracium scabriusculum Schwein.
*Hieracium acranthophorum Omang
*Hieracium columbianum Rydb.

Common Names: Canadian hawkweed, Canada hawkweed, Narrowleaf hawkweed, or Northern hawkweed

Habitat: Hieracium umbellatum is native to most of the temperate parts of the northern hemisphere. It grows on roadsides, banks, open woods, copses, heaths and rocks, mainly in lowland areas.

Description:
Hieracium umbellatum is a perenniial plant,, growing to 0.8 m (2ft 7in). tall, glabrous below, becoming stellate-puberulent above, without long, spreading hairs, and with milky juice. Leaves are alternate, the basal and lower cauline small and soon deciduous, the others, except for the reduced upper ones, nearly alike in size and shape; leaves sessile but not clasping, up to 10 cm. long and 2 cm. wide, with a few coarse, irregular teeth, and short, stiff hairs on the margins. It is in flower from July to September, and the seeds ripen from August to October. Flowers heads several in an open inflorescence, 40- to 110-flowered; involucre 6-13 mm. high, its bracts imbricate, glabrous; corollas ligulate, yellow. Fruits are achene. (a small, dry one-seeded fruit that does not open to release the seed.) Fruit is a dry seed that ripens to black, with a tuft of light brown hair to carry it off in the wind.

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The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Apomictic (reproduce by seeds formed without sexual fusion). The plant is self-fertile.

Cultivation: Prefers a well-drained low-fertility soil, neutral or acid, and a sunny position. Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Edible Uses: Young leaves are edible.

Medicinal Uses: One report says that the plant has medicinal uses but gives no details.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hieracium_umbellatum
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hieracium+umbellatum
http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection/taxon.php?Taxon=Hieracium%20umbellatum

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Herbs & Plants

Hibiscus tilliaceus

Botanical Name:Hibiscus tilliaceus
Family: Malvaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Malvales
Genus: Hibiscus
Species: H. tiliaceus

Synonyms: Talipariti tiliaceum (L.) Fryxell

Common names : Sea hibiscus, Beach hibiscus, Coastal (or coast) hibiscus, Coastal (or coast) cottonwood, Green cottonwood, Native hibiscus, Native rosella, Cottonwood hibiscus, Kurrajong, Sea rosemallow, Balibago (Tagalog), Malabago or malbago (Cebuano – Southern), Maribago (Cebuano – Northern), Waru (Javanese), Baru or bebaru (Malay), Pagu (Chamorro), Hau (Hawaiian), Fau (Samoan), Purau (Tahitian), and Vau tree.

Habitat: Hibiscus tilliaceus is native to coastal areas of Australia, South East Asia and the South Pacific It grows on the coastal swamps; edges of mangrove swamps.

Description:
Hibiscus tilliaceus is an evergreen tree growing to 8 m (26ft) with a trunk up to 15 cm (5.9 in) in diameter. The flowers of H. tiliaceus are bright yellow with a deep red center upon opening. Over the course of the day, the flowers deepen to orange and finally red before they fall. The branches of the tree often curve over time. The leaves are heart shaped and deep red in the var. rubra.
The flowers are pollinated by Insects. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

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Cultivation:
Climate: subtropical to tropical. Humidity: humid. Sea Hibiscus is suited to coastal environments. It tolerates salinity and waterlogging, and can grow in a variety of coastal sands and soils. pH Level: Acid, Neutral, Alkaline. Soil Type: Sandy, Loamy, Sandy loam. Light: Sunny, Light shade. Soil Moisture: Well-drained, Moist soil. Tolerates light frost. Found at elevations from sea level to 800m (2,600ft) in areas that receive 900–2,500mm (35–98in) of annual rainfall. Carbon Farming Solutions – Cultivation: minor global crop. Management: coppice (Describes the non-destructive management systems that are used in cultivation)

Edible Uses:
Young leaves and green barks are eaten as a famine food. Leaves are eaten, femented into a sauce, used as a substrate for tempeh starter culture or boiled in salt water to form a beverage called Onge tea . The flowers can be eaten as a potherb or dipped in batter and fried.
In Indonesia hibiscus tiliaceus is also used for fermenting tempeh. The undersides of the leaves are covered in downy hairs known technically as trichomes to which the mold Rhizopus oligosporus can be found adhering in the wild. Soybeans are pressed into the leaf, and stored. Fermentation occurs resulting in tempeh.

The bark and roots may be boiled to make a cooling tea to cool fevers, and its young leafy shoots may be eaten as vegetables.

Medicinal Uses: Flowers have laxative properties.

Other Uses:
The wood of H. tiliaceus has a specific gravity of 0.6. It has been used in a variety of applications, such as seacraft construction, firewood, and wood carvings. It is easy to plane and turns well, so it is regarded by many as a high quality furniture wood. Plant fibers taken from the stems have traditionally been used in rope making, while its bark has been used like cork, in sealing cracks in boats. Native Hawaiians used the wood to make iako (spars) for waa (outrigger canoes), mouo (fishing net floats), and au koi (adze handles). Kaula ilihau (cordage) was made from the bast fibers. Hau would be used to make ama (canoe floats) if wiliwili (Erythrina sandwicensis) was unavailable.

Hibiscus tiliaceus is widely used in Asian countries as a subject for the art of bonsai, especially Taiwan. The finest specimens are taken from Kenting National Park. Lending itself to free grafting, the leaf size is reduced fairly quickly. Its leaves are also used in cooking, as trays for steamed rice cakes .

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hibiscus_tiliaceushttps://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hibiscus+tilliaceus

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Herbs & Plants

Heuchera glabra

Botanical Name: Heuchera glabra
Family: Saxifragaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Saxifragales
Genus: Heuchera

Common Name: Alpine Heuchera

Habitat: Heuchera glabra is native to Western N. America. It growsw on the stream banks and crevices of moist rocks from the coast to above the timber line.

Description:
Heuchera glabra is an evergreen perennial herb, growing to 0.6 m (2ft). Leaves are heart shaped with point at the apex and the margines are lobed. Leaf blades are squared at the base. Flower color is white and the size is about 0.2 inches. It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees.

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Cultivation:
Succeeds in any good sweet garden soil that does not dry out in spring. Prefers full sun but tolerates partial shade. Prefers a well-drained fairly rich and not too heavy soil. Apt to hybridize with other members of this genus. A very ornamental plant.

Edible Uses: Leaves are eaten -raw or cooked. Not choice.

Medicinal Uses: The root is antiseptic, salve, styptic and tonic. It has been used to treat inflammation of the testicles caused by syphilis.

Other Uses: The root can be used as an alum substitute, this is a mordant used in fixing dyes. The root is rich in tannin(it contains about 9 – 20%), is this the active ingredient that acts as a mordant?. A good ground cover plant for the woodland garden.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heuchera
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Heuchera+glabra
https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=HEGL5

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Herbs & Plants

Heuchera diversifolia

Botanical Name: Heuchera diversifolia
Family: Saxifragaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Saxifragales
Genus: Heuchera

Synonyms: Heuchera micrantha diversifolia. (Rydb.)Rossend.Butters.&Lakela.

Common Name: Alum Root, Crevice alumroot, Coral bells

Habitat:
Heuchera diversifolia iis natiove to western N. America – British Columbia to California. It grows on moist banks of humus and rocks in woodland below 600 metres, from British Columbia to California. Gravelly banks and rock crevices from low elevations to the sub-alpine zone.

Description:
Heuchera diversifolia is an evergreen Perennial growing to 0.6 m (2ft) by 0.4 m (1ft 4in).
It is in leaf all year, in flower from July to August, and the seeds ripen from August to September. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Bees.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in any good sweet garden soil that does not dry out in spring. Prefers full sun but tolerates partial shade. Prefers a well-drained fairly rich and not too heavy soil. Plants are hardy to about -15°c. Apt to hybridize with other members of this genus. This species is probably best treated as a sub-species of H. micrantha.

Edible Uses: Young leaves – cooked and eaten . Not very palatable.

Medicinal Uses: The root is antiphlogistic, antiseptic, astringent, febrifuge and ophthalmic.

Other Uses: The root can be used as an alum substitute, this is a mordant used in fixing dyes. The root is rich in tannin, is this the active ingredient that acts as a mordant?. A good ground cover plant for the woodland garden. Plants should be spaced about 30cm apart each way.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heuchera
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Heuchera+diversifolia