Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies Pediatric

Infantile Colic

[amazon_link asins=’B0747NKNP9,B00G600AXA,B01IKTIF2M,B00JFCCOCG,B003N2RX34,B0089DP10Y,9529263031′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’1d13b514-97cd-11e7-85a0-d5f96502f729′]

What is infantile colic?……….CLICK & SEE
Infantile colic was first described as indigestion. While different diagnostic criteria have emerged since then, there has never been complete agreement on what colic is, what causes it, or how to treat it. The most widely accepted definition of colic today is “unexplainable and uncontrollable crying in babies from 0 to 3 months old, more than 3 hours a day, more than 3 days a week for 3 weeks or more, usually in the afternoon and evening hours.”

Who suffers from colic?
It has been widely estimated that between 8% and 49% of newborns suffer from colic, or an estimated average of 22% of all newborns who suffer from colic at some time. The condition is regarded as self-limiting, disappearing spontaneously at three months of age; however, studies have shown that many cases of colic will persist until six and even 12 months of age, causing considerable distress and frustration for both children and parents.

What are some of the symptoms of colic?
The most common symptom of colic is “excessive crying” — more hours of crying and more stretches of crying per day than non-symptomatic children. The crying may also have a higher frequency/pitch than normal babies. Other possible symptoms include motor unrest (flexing of the knees against the abdomen, clenching of the fists, and extension or straightening of the trunk, legs and arms)

What can Chiropratic do?
For years, chiropractors have cared for children with colic symptoms, and with apparently good results. In fact, the benefit of chiropractic for managing infantile colic was clearly illustrated in a recent study that compared the short-term effects of spinal manipulation vs. drug intervention (a drug called “dimethicone“). Results not only showed that chiropractic adjustments were effective in reducing colic symptoms, most notably the average hours per day spent crying, but also that the use of drugs was not particularly effective, and certainly less effective than chiropractic care. Your doctor of chiropractic can evaluate your child’s condition and recommend the best approach for maximizing health and wellness.

Source:ChiriFind.com


Advertisements
Categories
Ailmemts & Remedies Pediatric

Cat Scratch Disease

[amazon_link asins=’B00TGX5PIE,B01NBJ3UD3,B005IXBIX2,B01EAPKKF0,B0054DB0D4,B01JP8Y75G,B0044KLP2E,B008CYJ82M,B0092DEPF2′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’88bdf827-06e8-11e7-a4fc-6bd33d701e4f’]

What is cat scratch disease?

Cat scratch disease (CSD) is a bacterial disease caused by Bartonella henselae. Most children with CSD have been bitten or scratched by a cat and developed a mild infection at the point of injury. Lymph nodes, especially those around the head, neck, and upper limbs, become swollen. Additionally, a youngster with CSD may experience fever, headache, fatigue, and a poor appetite.

Can my cat transmit Bartonella henselae to me?

Sometimes, yes, cats can spread B. henselae to people. Most people get CSD from cat bites and scratches. Kittens are more likely to be infected and to pass the bacterium to people. About 40% of cats carry B. henselae at some time in their lives. Cats that carry B. henselae do not show any signs of illness; therefore, parents cannot tell which cats can spread the disease to you. children with immunocompromised conditions, such as those undergoing immunosuppressive treatments for cancer, organ transplant patients, and children with HIV/AIDS, are more likely than others to have complications of CSD. Although B. henselae has been found in fleas, so far there is no evidence that a bite from an infected flea can give you CSD.

How can I reduce my child’s risk of getting cat scratch disease from my cat?

  • Avoid “rough play” with cats, especially kittens. This includes any activity that may lead to cat scratches and bites.
  • Wash cat bites and scratches immediately and thoroughly with running water and soap.
  • Do not allow cats to lick open wounds that your child may have.
  • Control fleas.
  • If your child develops an infection (with pus and pronounced swelling) where they were scratched or bitten by a cat or develop symptoms, including fever, headache, swollen lymph nodes, and fatigue, contact your child’s physician.

COMMON OCCURANCE:

Swollen glands a Common Occurrence :

Most adults know that an unexplained lump is one of the seven warning signs of cancer. So it is easy to understand why discovering an enlarged lymph node in their child’s neck or under their arm strikes fear in a parent’s heart. They suspect the worst and arrange a prompt visit with their youngster’s physician. True, enlarged lymph nodes can be a symptom of a serious disease, but in children that is rarely the case.

Made up of specialized blood cells, lymph nodes are an important part of the body’s defense system. There are nearly 1,000 of them stationed throughout the body, ranging in size from a pinhead to a small grape. Nodes act as filtering plants for the lymph system, trapping and eliminating foreign particles and infectious agents from the circulation. In addition, lymph nodes act to prevent the spread of infection by producing white blood cells and antibodies to destroy infecting germs and poisons. When lymph nodes enlarge, it usually means that the nodes are being called into action to make extra antibody or are filtering out unfriendly germs. Any illness or wound, even one as minor as an insect bite, can mobilize this response, which explains why children’s nodes can be swollen even when the youngster does not seem sick.

click to see the pictures>….…(01).....(1)....(2).……..(3)……….

The lymph node system is divided into different districts with each part of the body being defended by its own network of nodes. Most of the time, the location of the enlaged node indicates where the current or past infection was located. For example, since most infections enter the child’s body through the nose, mouth, and throat, the lymph nodes in the neck (especially the ones just under the corner of the jaw bone) are most often swollen and tender. When a child has an infection in the arm, the nodes under the arm will enlarge. Similarly, swollen nodes found in the groin usually indicate an infection in the leg. Certain viral infections, like infectious mononucleosis, can cause swelling of the lymph nodes all over the body. Occasionally, the node itself can become infected causing skin redness, node tenderness, and in rare cases a yellow discharge is seen oozing from the lump. When this occurs, parents should contact the child’s physician since antibiotics will probably be needed.

Because less fat covers the lymph nodes in children, they are very easy to feel, even when they are not busy filtering germs or making antibody. Furthermore, a youngstes nodes enlarge faster and get bigger in response to an infection and stay swollen longer, “like a peace keeping force that remains behind after the battles have all been fought,” according to California pediatrician Dr. Gilbert Simon. “They both seem to last a lot longer than would appear necessary.”

When a child’s lymph nodes enlarge without an obvious reason, infections such as mononucleosis, tuberculosis, and a number of viruses, may be responsible. Another cause of lymph node swelling is a common condition called “Cat-Scratch Disease” that follows weeks to months after a scratch from a cat (most often a kitten).

Still, the major concern for most parents when they feel a lymph node in their child is leukemia or Hodgkin’s Disease. Physicians also think about this possibility, and use child’s physical examination to help determine whether an enlarged node is worrisome or not.

The first important finding is the gland’s location – lymph nodes in the neck are less likely to be a problem than those found above the collarbone, for example. A node that is growing rapidly is potentially more serious than one that remains the same size for a period of time. Physicians are less concerned about a swollen node when the cause is found, such as a past ear or throat infection. Generally, a lymph gland that is easily movable and can be rolled around under the skin is less likely to be caused by a serious disease. The size of the lymph node is usually a poor indicator of its cause, but a node that is abnormally large should always be carefully watched. While all nodes in children feel like firm rubber, an extremely hard lymph node might be more cause for concern. The last sign doctors look for has more to do with the child than node. Lymph node swelling that persists while the child begins experiencing intermittent fevers, weight loss, night sweats, fatigue, or loss of appetite requires a more intensive investigation.

Occasionally, a two-week trial of antibiotics will help determine whether or not a swollen lymph node is worrisome. If the node responds to medication by getting smaller, an infection is most likely the cause. Failure of the lymph node to get smaller may mean followup observation perhaps additional studies. Investigations might include a blood count, skin test for tuberculosis and cat-scratch disease, throat culture, chest x-ray and a mononucleosis test.

A physician might consider a biopsy of the lymph node if the swelling persists without an apparent diagnosis. Fortunately, most biopsies do not reveal cancer but reassure both the family and physician that the condition is not malignant. It can also help in making the diagnosis!

Doctors caring for kids frequently exam their young patients after a parent discovers a swollen lymph node. Since young children are more suscpetible to infections than older kids and adults, enlarged nodes are very common. However, whenever a parent is worried after finding a lump in their child, they should check with their pediatrician, just for safety sake.

 Swollen Glands Rarely Serious :-
Discovering a bump in your young child’s neck or under their arm can strike fear into the hearts of parents. True, this can be the sign of a serious illness such as cancer or tuberculosis, but that’s rarely the case. Children quite often have visible enlarged glands, especially in their necks, and most of the time the swelling indicates the presence of an infection of some kind. Every wonder what are these “swollen glands?” Think back to the last time that you were sick and visited your doctor. If your memory is good, you might recall the doctor carefully palpated all sides of your neck. More than just to soothe a tense patient, this exam provided important clues for your doctor about the body’s current “battle readiness” in the war against infections diseases.

Swollen glands are, in fact, specialized tissue called lymph nodes. There are more than a thousand lymph nodes scattered throughout the body, ranging in size from a pinhead to a small grape. These glands consist of a dense core of cells that serve as a “staging area” for the body’s fight against disease by producing white blood cells and antibodies. The lymph glands also filter out impurities in the body such as germs and foreign proteins. The glands in young children are covered with less tissue and fat than in adults, and so are more visible. When a physician feels a swollen node on physical examination, it usually infers the possibility of some infectious process at work.

In children, swollen lymph nodes are usually due to viral illnesses. Another frequent cause of enlerged glands in children is “Cat Scratch Disease.” The course of children with “Cat-Scratch Disease” is fairly consistent; several weeks to months after a scratch or bite from a cat, the lymph glands that drain the scratch site become enlarged and tender. For example, if the scratch is on the hands or arms, the lymph glands under the arm or in the neck become swollen. Likewise, the lymph glands in the groin enlarge if the cat scratch was on the leg. Additionally, the skin over the enlarged gland(s) may become red and warm. Usually by the time the lymph glands become enlarged, the primary scratch site has completely healed over. The child is otherwise healthy; rarely are there other symptoms present, such as headache, fever, persistent fatigue, or a sore throat.

“Cat-Scratch Disease” was first described by doctors in the 1930’s and is primarily a pediatric disease, with 80% of cases occurring in persons under 21 years of age. Over 90% of the children have been exposed to a healthy cat, usually a kitten (since adult cats are probably smart enough to stay away from kids!). Boys have a higher chance of getting the disease, perhaps because they tend to be more aggressive when playing with their pets. Interestingly, 25% of children cannot recall actually being scratched by a cat! The incubation period of the disease is usually 7 to 12 days after exposure, but it can be as long as three months. Person to person transmission has not been reported. The actual cause of “Cat-Scratch Disease” is unknown, but investigators have recently isolated what appears to be a previously unknown bacteria at the site of the infections. More research will be necessary to better define the disease and to then develop appropriate treatment.

The diagnosis of “Cat-Scratch Disease” is usually made by a history of exposure to a cat, an inoculation or scratch site, and a physical examination of the child. While there is a definite test to confirm the diagnosis it is not readily available to most practicing physicians. Since enlarged lymph nodes can be caused by other medical conditions, your child’s doctor may order other tests, such as a tuberculosis skin test, blood tests, chest x-rays, or even a biopsy of the lymph gland itself.

Prevention of “Cat-Scratch Disease” is difficult; there are over 50 million cats in the United States and cases of “Cat-Scratch Disease” can occur even though a cat has been declawed. Parents should teach their children to avoid bites and scratches, and not to allow a cat to lick open skin wounds on the child. Parents of a young child with “Cat-Scratch Disease” frequently ask about permanent removal of the animal from the home, but this is unnecessary. The cat who transmits “Cat-Scratch Disease” is not sick (Veterinarians are presently unable to test cats for this illness) and the disease confers lifelong immunity to the child. This means that each child will only be stricken once by the disease. Furthermore, not every child who gets scratched by a cat will get the illness. Because there has never been a case of child-to-child transmission, isolation from other siblings or playmates is unnecessary.

Parents need to help their children through the extended recovery period, which may be as long as five months. Treatment includes acetaminophen for fever and ibuprofen for pain. Hot, salt water compresses on the involved glands have been known to shorten the duration of lymph gland enlargement. Rough-housing and contact sports should probably be avoided until the glands are no longer tender. In some cases, the involved lymph glands may need to be sampled by needle aspiration by a surgeon to insure that other diseases are not present. This is usually done if the gland becomes extremely painful and disabling to the child. The long term outlook for children with “Cat-Scratch Disease” is similar to other common infectious diseases in children, with little long term effects persisting into adulthood. Parents whose households also include cats as pets should be on the look out for swollen glands in their children, for this may be a tip-off to this common and relatively harmless disease caused by a cat scratch.

Source:KidsGrowth.com

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Pediatric

Tips for Protecting Your Child from Dog Bites

[amazon_link asins=’B076ZJYKB8,B075F2LDM4,B07BDLCM8J,B000MVTN0U,B079DZ5X1Z,B01I080YB8,B075K6SC68,B07CVHFJXL,B00CTJ8E8K’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’a58bbf48-8dbb-11e8-bb2a-c10ef68948cc’]

Nearly half of all U.S. Children have been bitten by a dog, and boys 5 to 9 years old appear to be at greatest risk. In addition, all children are more likely than adults to receive dangerous bites to the head, face, and neck.

CLICK & SEE

Still, many bites are preventable if families follow basic safety tips and demonstrate responsible dog ownership. Parents can reduce the risk of your child suffering a potentially dangerous dog bite by following these guidelines:

* Choose a good breed for children. Some dogs are naturally more aggressive than others. Consider a good natured breed like a golden retriever, collie, old English sheepdog, or basset hound.

*Socialize your pet. Expose a puppy to a variety of situations and people, and continue that exposure as it grows older. But do not leave it unsupervised with your children. Many bites occur during playful roughhousing when a child does not realize that the animal is overexcited.

   #Train your dog. It should be willing to respond to commands consistently.
#Teach children never to disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies.
#Warn children never to approach a strange dog. Teach them to ask permission from a dog’s owner before petting it.
#Tell children not to run past dogs. Canines naturally like to chase things, and this gives them a reason to become excited and aggressive.
# Tell children never to stare a dog in the eye. The animal interprets it as a challenge and a sign of aggression.
# If a dog threatens your child, tell him or her to remain calm. Children should not turn and run. Tell them to avoid eye contact and stay still until the dog leaves. If they fall or a re knocked to the ground, tell them to curl into a ball with their hands over their heads and necks.

 Education, supervision can prevent dog bites:-   According to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), an estimated 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs in the United States each year. Fortunately, only about 20% of these require medical attention. With more than 52 million dogs kept as pets in the United States, bites will continue to pose a serious health threat to children.

Most of the 52 million dogs in this country kept as pets will never bite or kill anyone. Yet parents should remember that domesticated dogs retain their wild instincts and pose a health threat to their children.

Canine injuries range from simple puncture wounds to severe lacerations. Children are most likely to be bit on the head, face, or neck, while adults generally suffer wounds to the hands and upper arms. Over half are permanently scarred. The highest incidents of dog bite wounds occur in children five to fourteen years of age. Boys suffer dog bites twice as frequently as girls. Many parents falsely assume that their youngsters will be bitten by a strange or wild animal. More than 80% of bites are inflicted by the family pet or an animal known to the child.

Contrary to myth, few dog attacks can be traced to teasing and tormenting. Other human behaviors and characteristics, however, do make dogs more likely to attack them. One is being very young. Infants make up most of the fatal attack victims. It is suspected that these attacks occur because dogs mistake tiny babies for prey, and any breed of dog can make this tragic mistake. Therefore, never, ever leave any dog alone with an infant.

When the circumstances surrounding a bite are known, most dog attacks are provoked. Therefore, children should be educated on behaviors that will lessen their risk for an injury. Here are some guidelines:

· Immediately report stray dogs or dogs displaying unusual behavior.

· Teach children not to approach an unfamiliar dog or run away from a dog that is chasing them. A dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch someone who is running. Instruct the child to stand still with their hands at their sides. The dog will most likely stop, sniff the youngster, and leave them alone when they realize that the child is not a threat.

· Instruct children not to approach an injured dog (or any other animal). Instead, tell an adult about the animal.

· Do not pet or approach a dog while he or she is eating, sleeping, or guarding something. Pets naturally guard their food, their new puppies, and their toys. Dogs also protect their owners, and the property that belongs to their owners–such as an owner’s home, yard, or car. Toddlers frequently are bitten because they get right in the dog’s face, moving quickly and making high-pitched, unpredictable noises.

· Do not pet a dog without letting it see and sniff you first. Before petting someone elses dog, ask the owner for permission.

·Keep fingers away from a dog’s mouth. ·

·Teach children when it is okay to play with a dog and when to leave the dog alone.

·Most important, parents need to realize that young children need constant supervision when they’re with dogs.

· St. Petersburg veterinarian Dr. Steve Bryan believes early intervention is the best way to avoid bites from the family dog. “All puppies should receive obedience training with the family, “stated Dr. Bryan. “At the first sign of aggressive behavior the owners must act and seek help from the veterinarian, since the first bite is often devastating and leaves no recourse for the pet.”

· Dr. Bryan also commented that the likelihood of a bite inflicted by the family pet can be reduced by choosing more docile breeds. Which bites most? Research usually points to German shepherds, pit bulls, chows, Dobermans, rottweilers, Siberian huskies, malamutes, wolf-hybrids, Akitas, Labradors, cocker spaniels and golden retrievers. Remember, there is a danger in believing that the family is safe because parents have not picked a breed from the “dangerous” list. Remember, any dog can bite.

· If a dog bites once, it is apt to bite again. If parents get a warning, they better act on it. Time for that dog to stay with an uncle on the farm.

The intent of this article is not to scare parents into not owning a dog. Remember, the vast majority of dog – child interactions are wonderful. When parents choose their dog wisely, show them lots of love and take proper precautions, the family pooch will be a welcome addition to the household.

 These dog bite prevention tips are provided courtesy of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Categories
Pediatric

Pediatric

[amazon_link asins=’1591034868,B009BQEWLC,B009BEQSHA,B00ZCM43JU,0071848541,B01IDMQK96,1451151527,B001IDZLBG,B01MQSEBFQ’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’a2721467-270e-11e7-9a58-5704ac3c2ce7′]

Cleanliness is the most important word for handling chieldren.Emphasis has to be laid to keep the environment free from pollution.A polluted environment will give rise to various respiratory diseases and hearts and lungs ailments. Smoking in front of the chieldren should be totally band.

In the third world villages it is often found that the umbilical cords of the newborn are cut by uncleaned bamboo sticks by the untrained persons without knowing serious impact it will have on the health of the kid.Oil should never be applied on the chieldren as their skin is tender and hair follicles get chocked and the skin gets sticky.

Mothers must keep their hands clean and develop the habit of cutting nails regularly and rings should be removed during feeding the chield, as they are sourse of contamination and infection for the chieldren.Chieldren should be bathed regularly and mild soaps should be used atleast twice a week to keep them clean.Or else, the skin gets colonised with bacteria and other things.Over clothing of chieldren is to be avoided by parents as chieldren feel extreamly uneasy and sometimes it gives rise to fungal infection.Cases of fungal infection are found more in winter than summer.( specially in the third world.)The common belief that chieldren will suffer from hypothermia is absolutely wrong unless they are exposed to very low temperature ranging between 0 to 5 degree Celsicus.

Breast- feeding is most important for the healthy development of chieldren as it gives immunity to the kids. Mothers should breast feed their chieldren even when they are suffering from stomac upset. In case of diarrhoea, oral rehydration solution is the best medicine.Foreign milk should not be given to chieldren as it gives rise to various diseases starting from auto-immune diseases,multiple sclerosis,allergy and others.

Parents shouldnot force their chieldren as far feeding is concerned as they are the best judge of their appetite. Well and toomuch of it will be the reason for loss of interest in the food intake.

As the baby starts growing external babyfood over and above mother’s milk should be started as per advice of the pediactrician.Always keeping in mind every feeding equipment should be properly sterilised before it is used.All immunisation shorts should be given in time as per advice of the pediactrician.

.
Intimidation should not be used and fairly tales containing horror stories should not be read aloud before going to bed. Chieldren need to be hugged and kissed for for better psychological development.Dining room concept is essential and chieldren should develop the habit of eating in it.

Toilet training is a must to a growing baby.Every care should be taken so that baby’s colon is cleaned properly everyday.

Chieldren often suffer from cough and cold. The disease is due to the viral infection and there is nothing to fear.In some cases antibiotics are used for treatment but doctors should be consulted if the chield falls sick.

A healthy baby is the future healthy human of the world.

Categories
News on Health & Science Pediatric

Ease off on those kids, it’s their time to play

 Here’s some soothing medicine for stressed-out parents and overscheduled kids: The American Academy of Pediatrics says what children really need for healthy development is more good, old-fashioned playtime. Many parents load their children’s schedules with get-smart videos, enrichment activities and lots of classes in a drive to help them excel. The efforts often begin as early as infancy.

click & see

Spontaneous, free play whether it’s chasing butterflies, playing with “true toys” like blocks and dolls, or just romping on the floor with mom and dad often is sacrificed in the shuffle, a new academy report says.

Jennifer Gervasio has a 5-year-old son and 3-year-old daughter involved in preschool three mornings weekly, plus T-ball and ballet for each one day a week.

That’s a light schedule compared to her kids’ friends, and Gervasio said her son in particular has trouble finding buddies who are free to come over and just play.

“There’s just such a huge variety of things you can do for your kids if you have the resources, you almost feel why not,” said Gervasio, of Wilmette, Ill. “There is a part of me that would worry if I don’t sign my son up for some of these things, will he not be on par with the other kids.chieldren to play.

(From the news published in The Times Of India)