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Herbs & Plants

Touch-me-not

Botanical Name: Impatiens noli-tangere
Family: Balsaminaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Ericales
Genus: Impatiens
Species: I. noli-tangere

Synonyms:
*Balsamina lutea Delarbre
*Balsamina noli-tangere (L.) Scop.
*Impatiens komarovii Pobed.
*Impatiens lutea Lam. nom. illeg.

Common Names: Touch-me-not, Touch-me-not balsam

Habitat:Touch-me-not balsam or Touch me not is native to Europe, including Britain, from Scandanavia to France, east to Macedonia and temperate Asia.
It grows on side of streams, wet ground in woods in N. Wales, the Lake District, Yorkshire and Lancashire.

Description:
Impatiens noli-tangere is an annual plant growing to 1 m (3ft 3in).
It is in flower from July to September,color of the frower is yellow. The fruit is a capsul and the seeds ripen from August to October. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.

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Cultivation:
Succeeds in any reasonably good soil. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist well-drained humus rich soil in a cool site. Self sows in areas where the minimum temperature is no lower than -15°c. This plant has seed capsules that spring open forcibly as the seed ripens to eject the seed a considerable distance. The capsules are sensitive to touch even before the seed is ripe, making seed collection difficult but fun.

Edible Uses:
Young shoots – cooked and eaten. (See the notes above on toxicity below). Seed are eaten raw. A delicious nutty flavour but rather difficult to harvest, mainly because of their exploding seed capsules which scatter the ripe seed at the slightest touch.

Medicinal Uses:
The plant is antiseptic, diuretic, strongly emetic, laxative and vulnerary. It has been used in the treatment of stranguary and haemorrhoids. The plant is occasionally used internally in the treatment of haemorrhoids and as a laxative and diuretic, but the dose must be carefully adhered to since large quantities are strongly emetic. The plant is harvested at any time in the summer.

Known Hazards: Regular ingestion of large quantities of these plants can be dangerous due to their high mineral content. This report, which seems nonsensical, might refer to calcium oxalate. This mineral is found in I. capensis and so is probably also in other members of the genus. It can be harmful raw but is destroyed by thoroughly cooking or drying the plant. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones and hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impatiens_noli-tangere
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Impatiens+noli-tangere

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Herbs & Plants

Sweet William

Botanical Name:Dianthus barbatus
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Dianthus
Species: D. barbatus

Synonyms:
*Caryophyllus barbatus Moench
*Cylichnanthus barbatus Dulac
*Dianthus aggregatus Poir.
*Dianthus compactus Kit.
*Dianthus corymbosus F.Dietr.
*Dianthus girardinii Lamott

Common Name: Sweet William

Habitat:Sweet William is native to southern Europe and parts of Asia. It normally grows in Meadows and woods.Now it is growing in the mountains of southern Europe from the Pyrenees east to the Carpathians and the Balkans, with a variety disjunct in northeastern China, Korea, and southeasternmost Russia

Description:
Sweet William is a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant growing to 13–92 cm tall, with green to glaucous blue-green tapered leaves 4–10 cm long and 1–2 cm broad. The flowers are produced in a dense cluster of up to 30 at the top of the stems (known as an umbel). Each flower is 2–3 cm diameter with five petals displaying serrated edges, with a spicy, clove-like scent. Wild plants produce red flowers with a white base, but colours in cultivars range from white, pink, red, and purple to variegated patterns.

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There are two varieties:
*Dianthus barbatus var. barbatus. Southern Europe. Leaves broader, up to 2 cm broad.
*Dianthus barbatus var. asiaticus Nakai. Northeastern Asia. Leaves slenderer, not over 1 cm broad.

Cultivation:
Prefers a rich well-drained loamy soil in a sunny position, but succeeds in most soils including dry ones. A very ornamental plant, its flowers are very attractive to butterflies and moths. The flowers have a strong clove-like scent. Plants self-sow freely when grown in a suitable position. Although the Sweet William is a perennial species, it is quite short-lived and degenerates after its second year. It is best treated as a biennial in the garden.

Propagation: Through seeds.

Edible Uses: The flowers are considered edible. The flowers have a mild flavour and are used as a garnish for vegetable and fruit salads, cakes, desserts, cold drinks etc.

Medicinal Uses: Not yet known.

Other Uses:
Landscape Uses:Border, Container, Rock garden, Seashore, Specimen.
Special Features:Attracts butterflies, Suitable for cut flowers, Suitable for dried flowers, Fragrant flowers.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dianthus_barbatus
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Dianthus+barbatus

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Herbs & Plants

Sweet Sultan

Botanical Name: Amberboa moschata
Family: Asteraceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Tribe: Cynareae
Genus: Amberboa
Species: A. moschata

Synonyms:
*Centaurea moschata L.
*Centaurium moschatum (L.) Cass.
*Centaurium suaveolens Cass.
*Chryseis moschata (L.) Cass.
*Cyanus luteus Moench
*Cyanus moschatus (L.) Gaertn.

Common Names: Sweet Sultan

Habitat: Sweet Sultan is native to Turkey, Iraq, Iran, and the Caucasus.

Description:
Amberboa moschata is an annual,branching herb grows up to 50 cm tall. Flower heads are usually showy and sweet-scented.

Leaf type: leaves are simple (i.e., lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets)
Leaf arrangement: alternate: there is one leaf per node along the stem
basal: the leaves are growing only at the base of the plant
Leaf blade edges: the edge of the leaf blade has lobes, or it has both teeth and lobes, the edge of the leaf blade has teeth.

Flower type in flower heads: the flower head has disk flowers only, and lacks the strap-shaped flowers
Ray flower color: blue to purple…pink to red…white

Bloom Time:Late Spring/Early Summer, Mid Summer, Late Summer/Early Fall.

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Cultivation: Resents root disturbance so best sown in situ in well-drained neutral or alkaline soil in a sunny, sheltered position. May require staking

Propagation: From seed; sow indoors before last frost, direct sow after last frost.

Uses:
Sweet Sultan is not only beautiful, but also fragrant as well. The blooms will attract an array of beneficial insects including bumblebees, butterflies, hummingbirds and lady bugs.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amberboa_moschata
https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/amberboa/moschata/
https://www.myseedneeds.com/products/sweet-sultan-seeds?variant=37597231624
https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/280976/Amberboa-moschata-Dairy-Maid/Details

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Herbs & Plants

Pseudostellaria jamesiana

Botanical Name: Pseudostellaria jamesiana
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Caryophyllales
Genus: Pseudostellaria
Species:P. jamesiana

Synonyms:
*Alsine jamesiana
*Arenaria jamesiana
*Stellaria jamesiana

Common Name : Tuber starwort

Habitat: Pseudostellaria jamesiana is native to much of the western United States, where it can be found in sagebrush, coniferous forests, and many other types of habitat. It is a perennial herb growing from a rhizome network with tuberlike swellings. It grows on moist woodland amongst shrubs, westwards from Wyoming and Texas.

Description:
Pseudostellaria jamesiana is a perennial plant growing to 0.5 m (1ft 8in). The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Insects.The stem grows up to 45 to 60 centimeters in maximum height. It is four-angled and usually at least partially coated in glandular hairs. The thick lance-shaped leaves are up to 15 centimeters long, oppositely arranged, and sometimes rough and hairy. The inflorescence is a cluster of flowers at the tip of the stem or in the leaf axils. Flowers occurring in leaf axils are sometimes cleistogamous, never opening. Open flowers have five white petals with two lobes at the tips and usually ten long stamens.

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Edible Uses: Young leaves are eaten raw or cooked. Root – raw or cooked. Sweet and pleasant.

Medicinal Uses: Not known to us.

Known Hazards: Although no mention has been seen for this species, the leaves of some members of this genus contain saponins. Although toxic, these substances are very poorly absorbed by the body and so tend to pass through without causing harm. They are also broken down by thorough cooking. Saponins are found in many plants, including several that are often used for food, such as certain beans. It is advisable not to eat large quantities of food that contain saponins. Saponins are much more toxic to some creatures, such as fish, and hunting tribes have traditionally put large quantities of them in streams, lakes etc in order to stupefy or kill the fish. Stellaria jamesiana Torr. is a synonym of Pseudostellaria jamesiana (Torr.) W.A. Weber & R.L. Hartm.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudostellaria_jamesiana
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Stellaria+jamesiana

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Herbs & Plants

Callitriche stagnalis

Botanical Name: Callitriche stagnalis
Family: Plantaginaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales
Genus: Callitriche
Species: C. stagnalis

Synonyms: Callitriche platycarpa Kuetzing.

Common Names: Common starwort, Common water starwort, Common water-starwort, Mud water starwort, Pond water starwort, Pond water-starwort, Starwort, Water starwort.

Habitat: Callitriche stagnalis is native to both Europe and North Africa, where it is widespread in aquatic and subaquatic habitats. Currently C. stagnalis has been found in Europe, Northern Africa, The United States, Asia, Australia, New Caledonia, and New Zealand. It is normally found in aquatic environments particularly in which there is little to no motion. C. stagnalis frequents lakes, ponds, salt marshes, and slow moving rivers and streams. This species is able to thrive in both fresh and brackish water habitats.

Description:
Callitriche stagnalis is a perennial aquatic vascular plant species. Also known as pond water-starwort, C. stagnalis, may thrive in a variety of aquatic and subaquatic habitats, specially those exhibiting slowly moving to non-moving water.

The general appearance of C. stagnalis differs slightly depending on whether the plant being viewed was submerged or floating. Both exhibit long stems that vary in length from approximately 1 to 3 decimeters. These stems give rise to leaves that are oppositely arranged. The characteristic difference between the submerged and floating C. stagnalis is its leaf shape. Submerged leaves of C. stagnalis are linear, appearing long and thin with one vein running up the center. Floating leaves of C. stagnalis, however, may be spatulate to obovate in shape, which appear much wider that the typical submerged leaves, and contain a much larger number of veins (5-7). Growth of the leaves of C. stagnalis also differs depending on whether they are submerged or floating. Submerged leaves can grow 4 to 10 mm in length whereas floating leaves may only reach 2 mm in length. Submerged leaves are typically thin but may be wider in some cases making it harder to differentiate them from their floating counterparts which may grow 5 to 8 mm in width.

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Slender stems reach to the surface and form floating mats of leaves, which are often round to spoon-shaped but are variable in morphology. The plants are monoecious, with male and female flowers on an individual. Both types of flower are very tiny and whitish in color.

Cultivation:
A water plant, it should be allowed to root into the soil at the bottom of the pond or be grown in a pot in the pond. This species is an excellent oxygenator of the water and a good food source for fish. It provides a good habitat for wildlife in the pond, the leaves holding spawn well. This species belongs to one of only two known dicot genera where pollination taks place under water. Plants remain active all winter.

ery tiny and whitish in color.

Cultivation:

Propagation:
Seed – we have no details on this species but would suggest that the seed will be best sown in a greenhouse as soon as it is ripe in a pot standing in about 5cm of water. It is quite likely that the seed has a short viability, especially if it is allowed to become dry. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in trays of water in the greenhouse for at least their first winter, planting them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Cuttings can be taken at any time in the growing season. They root easily, even if just placed in a pot of water.

Edible Uses:
Plant may be eaten after properly boiled & seasoned.

Medicinal Uses:
Could not find anywhere.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callitriche_stagnalis
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Callitriche+palustris