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Herbs & Plants

Furcraea hexapetala

Botanical Name: Furcraea hexapetala
Family: Asparagaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Genus: Furcraea

Synonyms:
Agave aspera Jacq. Agave australis Steud. Agave cubensis Jacq. Agave hexapetala Jacq. Agave odorata Pers. Agave vivipara Arruda Furcraea agavephylla Brot. Furcraea aspera (Jacq.) M.Roem. Furcraea cahum Trel. Furcraea cubensis (Jacq.) Vent. Furcraea macrophylla Baker Furcraea valleculata Jacobi. Agave odorata, Agave cubensis

Common Names: Fique, Cuban Hemp

Habitat: Furcraea hexapetala is native to Northern S. America – Venezuela, Ecuador, Galapagos, north through the Caribbean and Mexico. It grows on the Tropical highlands.

Description:
Furcraea hexapetala is an evergreen Perennial succulent plants with long, fleshy leaves which grow upwards, similar to Yucca. Flower stalks and long and flowers range from green to white and are slightly fragranced.The plant grows to 1 m (3ft 3in) by 1 m (3ft 3in) at a fast rate.
The flowers are pollinated by Birds, Bees. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

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Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Propagation:
Seed – rarely produced. Plants frequently produce large numbers of bulbils, which root and grow into new plants when they fall to the ground. These bulbils have the capacity to remain viable for a number of years, even in unfavourable conditions

Medicinal Uses:
One of the most popular uses of asthma plant is for treating eye infections. Traditional healers commonly turn the weed into tea or decoction, and then recommended it as eye wash for those who have conjunctivitis. For Snakebites.

Other Uses: Agroforestry Uses: Planted as living fences. Other Uses: A fibre is obtained from the leaves.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furcraea
https://www.rhs.org.uk/plants/189941/i-furcraea-hexapetala-i/details
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Furcraea+hexapetala

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Herbs & Plants

Furcraea andina

Botanical Name: Furcraea andina
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales
Genus: Furcraea
Species: F. andina

Synonyms: Furcraea delevantii Riviere

Common Names: Pacpa, Fique

Habitat: Furcraea andina is native to Andean regions of Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. From here it was extended to Venezuela and the east coast of Brazil. It grows oropical highlands. All climates, from coastal plains to elevations above 3,000 metres.

Description:
Furcraea andina is a perennial succulent shrub kind of plant that grows 59 to 79 inches in both height and width. The stem alone grows about 40 to 80 inches tall and the leaves are thick and fleshy and in the form of a beautiful rosette. Some species come with spine-y leaves and once the plant matures, one can notice that the stalk looks like an asparagus shoot.

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Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, prefers well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid and neutral soils and can grow in very acid soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Propagation: Through seeds. Bulblets, Cuttings. Best method by bulbils found on lower stems.

Edible Uses: Edible Portion: Bud, Leaves – alcoholic drink. The young buds are edible. They are pickled. The leaves are used to make a fermented drink.

Mediicinal Uses: The leaves have been used in topic preparations for treatment of boils. The extract of leaves is used against horse lice.

Other Uses:
Packing (sacks and packages for agriculture). Ropes, Tapestry (rugs and tapestry). The fibres can be stained with different organic materials, such as avocado seed, achiote and eucalyptus cortex. Handcrafts, purses, bags, handbags, mattresses, curtains, shoes, umbrellas, baskets and many other products. Subproducts: Pulp for organic fertilizer and paper. Leaves juice used for soap, fungicides, alcoholic beverages (homemade tapetusa), organic fuel and animal food. Floral stem used in the construction of houses and ladders. Carbon Farming Solutions – Industrial Crop: fiber. Good leaf lamina fibres that need to be seperated from the rest of the plant. Lamina fibres cannot be used for fine textiles but for rope, nets, bags, and rugs. (Industrial crops are grown for non-food uses. Industrial crops provide resources in three main categories: materials, chemicals, and energy. Traditional materials include lumber and thatch, paper and cardboard, and textiles). Agroforestry Services: living fence (Agroforestry is a land use management system in which trees or shrubs are grown around or among crops or pastureland).

Known Hazards: Spines or sharp edges.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furcraea_andina
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Furcraea+andina

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Herbs & Plants

Furcraea foetida

Botaniical Name: Furcraea foetida
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Agavoideae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales
Genus: Furcraea
Species: F. foetida

Synonyms:
Agave bulbosa K.Koch Agave commelyni Salm-Dyck Agave foetida L. Agave gigantea (Vent.) D.Dietr. Agave madagascariensis (Haw.) Salm-Dyck Aloe foetida (L.) Crantz Fourcroya gigantea (Vent.) Hook. Funium piliferum Willemet Furcraea atroviridis Jacobi & Goeff. Furcraea barillettii Jacobi Furcraea commelyni (Salm-Dyck) Kunth Furcraea gigantea Vent. Furcraea madagascariensis Haw. Furcraea viridis Hemsl. Furcraea watsoniana Sander

Common Names: Giant Cabuya, Green-aloe or Mauritius-hemp

Habitat:
Furcraea foetida is native to the Caribbean and northern South America. It is widely cultivated and reportedly naturalized in many places (India, parts of Africa, Portugal, Australia, Thailand, Florida, New Zealand, and many oceanic islands). It grows on the Tropical highlands.

Description:
Furcraea foetida is an evergreen perennial subshrub, stemless or with a short stem up to 1 m tall. The leaves are sword-shaped, 1-1.8 m long and 10–15 cm broad at their widest point, narrowing to 6–7 cm broad at the leaf base, and to a sharp spine tip at the apex; the margins are entire or with a few hooked spines. The flowers are greenish to creamy white, 4 cm long, and strongly scented; they are produced on a large inflorescence up to 7.5 m tall.

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Cultivation:
The plant is cultivated in subtropical and tropical regions for products and as an ornamental plant for gardens. Its leaves are used to produce a natural fiber similar to sisal.

Propagation:
Seed – rarely produced. Plants frequently produce large numbers of bulbils, which root and grow into new plants when they fall to the ground. These bulbils have the capacity to remain viable for a number of years, even in unfavourable conditions.

Medicinal Uses:
The root has been used as blood purifying remedy. An infusion with sweet oil is drunk as a treatment for syphilis. The root is mixed with gin and used as a treatment for back pain. The leaves are febrifuge. They are used in a preparation with molasses or honey to treat children’s obstinate colds.

Other Uses:
Agroforestry Uses: Used as a hedge plant in desert gardens. A strong, good quality fibre is obtained from the leaves. It is thinner and softer than sisal. The fibre is usable for ropes and sacks. The long, soft fibre is used alone or with other fibres in twine, sacks, hammocks, and other products. It breaks down in salt water but withstands fresh water. The macerated young leaves are used as a hair shampoo and a soap.

Known Hazards: The leaves are used as a fish poison. This is probably due to a high content of saponins in the leaves

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furcraea_foetida
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Furcraea+foetida

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Fraxinus longicuspis

Botanical Name: Fraxinus longicuspis
Family: Oleaceae
Genus: Fraxinus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Synonyms : Fraxinus pubinervis. Blume.

Habitat: RFraxinus longicuspis is native to east Asia – central and southern Japan. It grows in deciduous forests in mountains at elevations of 100 – 1100 metres, C. and S. Japan.

Description:
Fraxinus longicuspis is a deciduous Tree growing to 70 ft high; buds rusty tomentose; shoots quadrangular, clad with brown, crisped hairs when young.The leaves are opposite (rarely in whorls of three), and mostly pinnately compound, though simple in a few species. Leaves with two or three pairs of lateral leaflets, which are distinctly stalked and up to 4 in. long and 1-1/4 in. wide.
It is in flower from April to May. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs) and is pollinated by Wind. The fruits on ash trees are samaras, similar to the winged seeds of maples, and they are usually grouped in clusters on the stem.The seeds, popularly known as “keys” or “helicopter seeds”, are a type of fruit known as a samara.

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Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: mildly acid, neutral and basic (mildly alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.
It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.

Propagation:
The seed is best harvested green – as soon as it is fully developed but before it has fully dried on the tree – and can then be sown immediately in a cold frame. It usually germinates in the spring. Stored seed requires a period of cold stratification and is best sown as soon as possible in a cold frame. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions or a nursery bed in late spring or early summer of the following year. If you have sufficient seed then it is possible to sow it directly into an outdoor seedbed, preferably in the autumn. Grow the seedlings on in the seedbed for 2 years before transplanting either to their permanent positions or to nursery beds.

Medicinal Uses: Its tremendous range of pharmacotherapeutic properties has been well documented including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial, and neuroprotective. In addition, its bioactive phytochemicals and secondary metabolites can be effectively used in cosmetic industry and as a competent antiaging agent.

Other Uses: A bluish indelible dye is produced by steeping the bark in water.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://www.google.com/search?q=medicinal+uses++of+Fraxinus+longicuspis+fruits&rlz=1C1JZAP_enIN944IN944&sxsrf=ALiCzsbEtR-T_OZhDJwvQfr6sEC_3ZeXOQ%3A1662696487231&ei=J7waY-PWDbOcseMPo9Kx-Ak&ved=0ahUKEwijhvaL64b6AhUzTmwGHSNpDJ8Q4dUDCA4&uact=5&oq=medicinal+uses++of+Fraxinus+longicuspis+fruits&gs_lcp=Cgdnd3Mtd2l6EAMyBQgAEKIEMgUIABCiBDIFCAAQogQyBQgAEKIEMgUIABCiBDoHCAAQHhCiBEoECEEYAEoECEYYAFAAWMI8YLNYaABwAXgAgAHPAogB2h2SAQcwLjEuOS41mAEAoAEBwAEB&sclient=gws-wiz

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Herbs & Plants

Frasera speciosa

Botanical Name: Frasera speciosa
Family: Gentianaceae
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Gentianales
Genus: Frasera
Species:F. speciosa

Synonyms:
*Frasera angustifolia
*F. macrophylla
*F. stenosepala
*Swertia radiata
*Kuntze.

Common Names: Green Gentian, Elkweed, Deer’s ears, and Monument plant.

Habitat: Frasera speciosa is native to Western N. America – California to Washington. It grows on dryish or dampish places. Rich soils in open pine woods, aspen groves etc, 1500 – 3000 metres.

Description:
Frasera speciosa is a biennial/perennial herb growing from a woody base surrounded by rosettes of large leaves that measure up to 50 centimeters long by 15 wide.It produces a single erect stem which can reach two meters in height.
The stem bears whorls of lance-shaped, pointed leaves smaller than those at the base. The plant is monocarpic, growing for several years and only flowering once before it dies. Flowering is synchronized among plants in a given area, with widespread, picturesque blooms occurring periodically. It is not known why some plants in an area will not flower in a mass flowering event, or what cues the plants rely on to initiate flowering. The inflorescence is a tall, erect panicle with flowers densely clustered at the top and then spread out in interrupted clusters below. Each flower has a calyx of four pointed sepals and a corolla of four pointed lobes each one to two centimeters long. The corolla is yellow-green with purple spots and each lobe has two fringed nectary pits at the base. There are four stamens tipped with large anthers and a central ovary. It is in flower from July to August. The species is hermaphrodite (has both male and female organs).

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Cultivation:
Suitable for: light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: mildly acid and neutral soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.

Propagation:
Through seeds – sow spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in late winter.

Edible Uses:
Roots may be edible : It has been reported that the N. American Indians ate the fleshy root of this plant, but caution is advised since the roots of closely related plants are used medicinally as emetics and cathartics. See the notes above on toxicity.

Medicinal Uses:
The whole plant is febrifuge, pectoral, laxative and tonic. An infusion of the dried, powdered leaves, or the root, has been used in the treatment of diarrhoea. A cooled decoction of the roots has been used in the treatment of asthma, colds, digestive complaints etc. An infusion of the plant has been used as a contraceptive. Caution is advised in the use of this plant, see the notes above on toxicity.

Other Uses:
The root, when ground into a powder and then mixed with oil, has been used as a parasiticide in order to kill lice.

Known Hazards: When used medicinally, large doses of the powdered root have proved fatal.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frasera_speciosa
https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Frasera+speciosa

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