Tag Archives: Adrenal gland

Cushing’s syndrome

Alternative Names: Itsenko-Cushing syndrome, hyperadrenocorticism or hypercorticism
Definition:
Cushing’s syndrome is a hormone disorder caused by high levels of cortisol in the blood. This can be caused by taking glucocorticoid drugs, or by tumors that produce cortisol or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or CRH

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Cushing’s disease refers to one specific cause of the syndrome, a tumor (adenoma) in the pituitary gland that produces large amounts of ACTH, which in turn elevates cortisol. It is the most common cause of Cushing’s syndrome, responsible for 70% of cases.

This pathology was described by Harvey Cushing in 1932.

Cushing’s syndrome is not confined to humans and is also a relatively common condition in domestic dogs and horses.

Treatments for Cushing’s syndrome can return your body’s cortisol production to normal and noticeably improve your symptoms. The earlier treatment begins, the better your chances for recovery.

Symptoms:
SymptomsMost people with Cushing syndrome will have:

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•Upper body obesity (above the waist) and thin arms and legs
•Round, red, full face (moon face)
•Slow growth rate in children

Skin changes that are often seen:
•Acne or skin infections
•Purple marks (1/2 inch or more wide) called striae on the skin of the abdomen, thighs, and breasts
•Thin skin with easy bruising

Muscle and bone changes include:
•Backache, which occurs with routine activities
•Bone pain or tenderness
•Collection of fat between the shoulders (buffalo hump)
•Thinning of the bones, which leads to rib and spine fractures
•Weak muscles

Woman with cushing syndrome often have:

•Excess hair growth on the face, neck, chest, abdomen, and thighs
•Menstrual cycle becomes irregular or stops

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Men may have:
•Decreased fertility
•Decreased or no desire for sex
•Impotence

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Other symptoms that may occur with this disease:
*Mental changes, such as depression, anxiety and irritability or changes in behavior
*Fatigue
*Headache
*High blood pressure
*Increased thirst and urination
*Muscle weakness
*Loss of emotional control
*Cognitive difficulties
*New or worsened high blood pressure
*Glucose intolerance that may lead to diabetes
*Headache
*Bone loss, leading to fractures over time

Iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (caused by treatment with corticosteroids) is the most common form of Cushing’s syndrome. The incidence of pituitary tumors may be relatively high, as much as one in five people, but only a minute fraction are active and produce excessive hormones.

Adults with the disease may also have symptoms of extreme weight gain, excess hair growth in women, high blood pressure, and skin problems. In addition, they may show:

*muscle and bone weakness
*osteoporosis
*diabetes mellitus
*hypertension
*moodiness, irritability, or depression
*sleep disturbances
*menstrual disorders such as amenorrhea in women and decreased fertility in men
*baldness
*hypercholesterolemia

Cause:
There are several possible causes of Cushing’s syndrome.

Exogenous vs. endogenous Hormones that come from outside the body are called exogenous; hormones that come from within the body are called endogenous.

The most common cause of Cushing’s syndrome is exogenous administration of glucocorticoids prescribed by a health care practitioner to treat other diseases (called iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). This can be an effect of steroid treatment of a variety of disorders such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis, or in immunosuppression after an organ transplant. Administration of synthetic ACTH is also possible, but ACTH is less often prescribed due to cost and lesser utility. Although rare, Cushing’s syndrome can also be due to the use of medroxyprogesterone.

Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome results from some derangement of the body’s own system of secreting cortisol. Normally, ACTH is released from the pituitary gland when necessary to stimulate the release of cortisol from the adrenal glands.

*In pituitary Cushing’s, a benign pituitary adenoma secretes ACTH. This is also known as Cushing’s disease and is responsible for 70% of endogenous Cushing’s syndrome.

*In adrenal Cushing’s, excess cortisol is produced by adrenal gland tumors, hyperplastic adrenal glands, or adrenal glands with nodular adrenal hyperplasia.

*Finally, tumors outside the normal pituitary-adrenal system can produce ACTH that affects the adrenal glands. This final etiology is called ectopic or paraneoplastic Cushing’s syndrome and is seen in diseases like small cell lung cancer.

Pseudo-cushing’s syndrome:
Elevated levels of total cortisol can also be due to estrogen found in oral contraceptive pills that contain a mixture of estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen can cause an increase of cortisol-binding globulin and thereby cause the total cortisol level to be elevated. However, the total free cortisol, which is the active hormone in the body, as measured by a 24 hour urine collection for urinary free cortisol, is normal.

Pathophysiology:
The hypothalamus is in the brain and the pituitary gland sits just below it. The paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus releases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which stimulates the pituitary gland to release adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). ACTH travels via the blood to the adrenal gland, where it stimulates the release of cortisol. Cortisol is secreted by the cortex of the adrenal gland from a region called the zona fasciculata in response to ACTH. Elevated levels of cortisol exert negative feedback on the pituitary, which decreases the amount of ACTH released from the pituitary gland. Strictly, Cushing’s syndrome refers to excess cortisol of any etiology. One of the causes of Cushing’s syndrome is a cortisol secreting adenoma in the cortex of the adrenal gland. The adenoma causes cortisol levels in the blood to be very high, and negative feedback on the pituitary from the high cortisol levels causes ACTH levels to be very low. Cushing’s disease refers only to hypercortisolism secondary to excess production of ACTH from a corticotrophic pituitary adenoma. This causes the blood ACTH levels to be elevated along with cortisol from the adrenal gland. The ACTH levels remain high because a tumor causes the pituitary to be unresponsive to negative feedback from high cortisol levels.

Cushing’s Syndrome was also the first autoimmune disease identified in humans.

Diagnosis:-
When Cushing’s syndrome is suspected, either a dexamethasone suppression test (administration of dexamethasone and frequent determination of cortisol and ACTH level), or a 24-hour urinary measurement for cortisol offer equal detection rates. Dexamethasone is a glucocorticoid and simulates the effects of cortisol, including negative feedback on the pituitary gland. When dexamethasone is administered and a blood sample is tested, high cortisol would be indicative of Cushing’s syndrome because there is an ectopic source of cortisol or ACTH (e.g.: adrenal adenoma) that is not inhibited by the dexamethasone. A novel approach, recently cleared by the US FDA, is sampling cortisol in saliva over 24 hours, which may be equally sensitive, as late night levels of salivary cortisol are high in Cushingoid patients. Other pituitary hormone levels may need to be ascertained. Performing a physical examination to determine any visual field defect may be necessary if a pituitary lesion is suspected, which may compress the optic chiasm causing typical bitemporal hemianopia.

When any of these tests are positive, CT scanning of the adrenal gland and MRI of the pituitary gland are performed to detect the presence of any adrenal or pituitary adenomas or incidentalomas (the incidental discovery of harmless lesions). Scintigraphy of the adrenal gland with iodocholesterol scan is occasionally necessary. Very rarely, determining the ACTH levels in various veins in the body by venous catheterization, working towards the pituitary (petrosal sinus sampling) is necessary.

Mnemonic:
C – Central obesity, Cervical fat pads, Collagen fibre weakness, Comedones (acne)
U – Urinary free cortisol and glucose increase
S – Striae, Suppressed immunity
H – Hypercortisolism, Hypertension, Hyperglycemia, Hypercholesterolemia, Hirsutism
I – Iatrogenic (Increased administration of corticosteroids)
N – Noniatrogenic (Neoplasms)
G – Glucose intolerance, Growth retardation

Treatment:-
Most Cushing’s syndrome cases are caused by steroid medications (iatrogenic). Consequently, most patients are effectively treated by carefully tapering off (and eventually stopping) the medication that causes the symptoms.

If an adrenal adenoma is identified it may be removed by surgery. An ACTH-secreting corticotrophic pituitary adenoma should be removed after diagnosis. Regardless of the adenoma’s location, most patients will require steroid replacement postoperatively at least in the interim as long-term suppression of pituitary ACTH and normal adrenal tissue does not recover immediately. Clearly, if both adrenals are removed, replacement with hydrocortisone or prednisolone is imperative.

In those patients not suitable for or unwilling to undergo surgery, several drugs have been found to inhibit cortisol synthesis (e.g. ketoconazole, metyrapone) but they are of limited efficacy.

Removal of the adrenals in the absence of a known tumor is occasionally performed to eliminate the production of excess cortisol. In some occasions, this removes negative feedback from a previously occult pituitary adenoma, which starts growing rapidly and produces extreme levels of ACTH, leading to hyperpigmentation. This clinical situation is known as Nelson’s syndrome.

Lifestyle and home remedies:-

The length of your recovery from Cushing’s syndrome will depend on the severity and cause of your condition. Remember to be patient. You didn’t develop Cushing’s syndrome overnight and your symptoms won’t disappear overnight, either. In the meantime, these tips may help you on your journey back to health.

*Increase activities slowly. You may be in such a hurry to get your old self back that you push yourself too hard too fast, but your weakened muscles need a slower approach. Work up to a reasonable level of exercise or activity that feels comfortable without overdoing it. You’ll improve little by little, and your persistence will be rewarded.

*Eat sensibly. Nutritious, wholesome foods provide a good source of fuel for your recovering body and can help you lose the extra pounds that you gained from Cushing’s syndrome. Make sure you’re getting enough calcium and vitamin D. Taken together, they help your body absorb calcium, which can help strengthen your bones, counteracting the bone density loss that often occurs with Cushing’s syndrome.

*Monitor your mental health. Depression can be a side effect of Cushing’s syndrome, but it can also persist or develop after treatment begins. Don’t ignore your depression or wait it out. Seek help promptly from your doctor or a therapist if you’re depressed, overwhelmed or having difficulty coping during your recovery.

*Gently soothe aches and pains. Hot baths, massages and low-impact exercises, such as water aerobics and tai chi, can help alleviate some of the muscle and joint pain that accompanies Cushing’s syndrome recovery.

*Exercise your brain. If you’re recovering from any cognitive difficulties as a result of Cushing’s syndrome, mental exercises, such as math problems and crossword puzzles, may improve your brain function.

Coping and support:-
Support groups can be valuable in dealing with Cushing’s syndrome and recovery. They bring you together with other people who are coping with the same kinds of challenges, along with their families and friends, and offer a setting in which youe can share common problems.

Ask your doctor about support groups in your community. Your local health department, public library and telephone book and the Internet also may be good sources to find a support group in your area.

Prognosis:
Removing the tumor may lead to full recovery, but there is a chance that the condition will return.

Survival for people with ectopic tumors depends on the tumor type. Untreated, Cushing syndrome can be life-threatening.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cushing’s_syndrome
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cushings-syndrome/DS00470
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000410.htm
http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/physical_health/conditions/cushing1.shtml

Cushing’s Syndrome


http://www.potbellysyndrome.com/documents/083EFB330BDDC27C6EEC8354AFFA139607633EB6.html
http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/c/cushings_disease/book-diseases-7a.htm

http://www.nature.com/eye/journal/v20/n6/fig_tab/6701956f4.html

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Addison’s Disease

Definition:
Addison’s disease is a disorder that results when your body produces insufficient amounts of certain hormones produced by your adrenal glands. In Addison’s disease, your adrenal glands produce too little cortisol, and often insufficient levels of aldosterone as well.

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Also called adrenal insufficiency or hypocortisolism, Addison’s disease can occur at any age, but is most common in people ages 30 to 50. Addison’s disease can be life-threatening.

Symptoms:

Addison’s disease symptoms usually develop slowly, often over several months, and may include:
*Muscle weakness and fatigue
*Weight loss and decreased appetite
*Darkening of your skin (hyperpigmentation)
*Low blood pressure, even fainting
*Salt craving
*Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)
*Nausea, diarrhea or vomiting
*Muscle or joint pains
*Irritability
*Depression

Acute adrenal failure (addisonian crisis)
Sometimes, however, the signs and symptoms of Addison’s disease may appear suddenly. In acute adrenal failure (addisonian crisis), the signs and symptoms may also include:

*Pain in your lower back, abdomen or legs
*Severe vomiting and diarrhea, leading to dehydration
*Low blood pressure
*Loss of consciousness
*High potassium (hyperkalemia)

Causes :
Your adrenal glands are located just above each of your two kidneys. These glands are part of your endocrine system, and they produce hormones that give instructions to virtually every organ and tissue in your body.

Your adrenal glands are composed of two sections. The interior (medulla) produces adrenaline-like hormones. The outer layer (cortex) produces a group of hormones called corticosteroids, which include glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and male sex hormones (androgens).

Some of the hormones the cortex produces are essential for life — the glucocorticoids and the mineralocorticoids.

*Glucocorticoids. These hormones, which include cortisol, influence your body’s ability to convert food fuels into energy, play a role in your immune system’s inflammatory response and help your body respond to stress.

*Mineralocorticoids. These hormones, which include aldosterone, maintain your body’s balance of sodium and potassium and water to keep your blood pressure normal.

*Primary adrenal insufficiency: Addison’s disease occurs when the cortex is damaged and doesn’t produce its hormones in adequate quantities. Doctors refer to the condition involving damage to the adrenal glands as primary adrenal insufficiency.

The failure of your adrenal glands to produce adrenocortical hormones is most commonly the result of the body attacking itself (autoimmune disease). For unknown reasons, your immune system views the adrenal cortex as foreign, something to attack and destroy.

Other causes of adrenal gland failure may include:
*Tuberculosis
*Other infections of the adrenal glands
*Spread of cancer to the adrenal glands
*Bleeding into the adrenal glands

Secondary adrenal insufficiency
Adrenal insufficiency can also occur if your pituitary gland is diseased. The pituitary gland makes a hormone called adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which stimulates the adrenal cortex to produce its hormones. Inadequate production of ACTH can lead to insufficient production of hormones normally produced by your adrenal glands, even though your adrenal glands aren’t damaged. Doctors call this condition secondary adrenal insufficiency.

Another more common possible cause of secondary adrenal insufficiency occurs when people who take corticosteroids for treatment of chronic conditions, such as asthma or arthritis, abruptly stop taking the corticosteroids.

Addisonian crisis
If you have untreated Addison’s disease, an addisonian crisis may be provoked by physical stress, such as an injury, infection or illness.

When to seek medical advice:
See your doctor if you have signs and symptoms that commonly occur in people with Addison’s disease. Most people with this condition experience darkening areas of skin (hyperpigmentation), severe fatigue, unintentional weight loss, and gastrointestinal problems, such as nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Dizziness or fainting, salt cravings, and muscle or joint pains also are common.

Your doctor can determine whether Addison’s disease or some other medical condition may be causing these problems.

Tests and diagnosis:-

Your doctor will talk to you first about your medical history and your signs and symptoms. If your doctor thinks that you may have Addison’s disease, you may undergo some of the following tests:

*Blood test. Measuring your blood levels of sodium, potassium, cortisol and ACTH gives your doctor an initial indication of whether adrenal insufficiency may be causing your signs and symptoms. A blood test can also measure antibodies associated with autoimmune Addison’s disease.

*ACTH stimulation test. This test involves measuring the level of cortisol in your blood before and after an injection of synthetic ACTH. ACTH signals your adrenal glands to produce cortisol. If your adrenal glands are damaged, the ACTH stimulation test shows that your output of cortisol in response to synthetic ACTH is blunted or nonexistent.

*Insulin-induced hypoglycemia test. Occasionally, doctors suggest this test if pituitary disease is a possible cause of adrenal insufficiency (secondary adrenal insufficiency). The test involves checking your blood sugar (blood glucose) and cortisol levels at various intervals after an injection of insulin. In healthy people, glucose levels fall and cortisol levels increase.

*Imaging tests. Your doctor may have you undergo a computerized tomography (CT) scan of your abdomen to check the size of your adrenal glands and look for other abnormalities that may give insight to the cause of the adrenal insufficiency. Your doctor may also suggest a CT scan or MRI scan of your pituitary gland if testing indicates you have secondary adrenal insufficiency.

Treatments and drugs:-
If you receive an early diagnosis of Addison’s disease, treatment may involve taking prescription corticosteroids. Because your body isn’t producing sufficient steroid hormones, your doctor may have you take one or more hormones to replace the deficiency. Cortisol is replaced using hydrocortisone (Cortef), prednisone or cortisone acetate. Fludrocortisone (Florinef) replaces aldosterone, which controls your body’s sodium and potassium needs and keeps your blood pressure normal.

You take these hormones orally in daily doses that mimic the amount your body normally would make, thereby minimizing side effects. If you’re facing a stressful situation, such as an operation, an infection or a minor illness, your doctor will suggest a temporary increase in your dosage. If you’re ill with vomiting and can’t retain oral medications, you may need corticosteroid injections.

In addition, your doctor may recommend treating androgen deficiency with an androgen replacement called dehydroepiandrosterone. Some studies indicate that, for women with Addison’s disease, androgen replacement therapy may improve overall sense of well-being, libido and sexual satisfaction.

You may click to learn more about:-
-> Natural Addison’s Disease Treatment
->Natural Help for Addison’s Disease
->AN ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY MEDICINE RESOURCE GUIDE
->Treatment For Addison’s Disease – Herbal Remedies – Natural Cures

Addisonian crisis
An addisonian crisis is a life-threatening situation that results in low blood pressure, low blood levels of sugar and high blood levels of potassium. This situation requires immediate medical care. Treatment typically includes intravenous injections of:

*Hydrocortisone
*Saline solution
*Sugar (dextrose

Coping and support:-

These steps may help you cope better with a medical emergency if you have Addison’s disease:

Carry a medical alert card and bracelet at all times. In the event you’re incapacitated, emergency medical personnel know what kind of care you need.

Keep extra medication handy. Because missing even one day of therapy may be dangerous, it’s a good idea to keep a small supply of medication at work, at a vacation home and in your travel bag, in the event you forget to take your pills. Also, have your doctor prescribe a needle, syringe and injectable form of corticosteroids to have with you in case of an emergency.

Stay in contact with your doctor. Keep an ongoing relationship with your doctor to make sure that the doses or replacement hormones are adequate but not excessive. If you’re having persistent problems with your medications, you may need adjustments in the doses or timing of the medications.

Sources:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/addisons-disease/DS00361/DSECTION=symptoms

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Adrenal Fatigue

Definition:
One common condition that frequently accompanies thyroid problems is adrenal exhaustion, also known as adrenal fatigue. It is claimed by alternative medicine practioners to be a condition of the body in which the adrenal glands are exhausted and unable to produce adequate hormones, notably cortisol, the stress hormone of the body.

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This so-called condition is unrecognized by the medical community. However, this fact accompanied by the suffering of many people gave rise to an industry of supplements and treatments for this supposed syndrome. General practitioners and psychologists routinely ascribe other causes for the claimed symptoms of adrenal fatigue, especially mental.

There is large confusion regarding the relation of this supposed syndrome to another very misunderstood syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome. The two may have common symptoms and it is difficult to distinguish.

About Adrenal Glands: Your two adrenal glands are small, triangular-shaped endocrine glands located on the top of each kidney. Each adrenal gland is approximately 3 inches wide, and a half inch high.

Each gland is divided into an outer cortex and an inner medulla. The cortex and medulla of the adrenal gland secrete different hormones. The adrenal cortex is essential to life, but the medulla may be removed with no life-threatening effects.

Symptoms:
Persons claimed to be suffering from adrenal fatigue often suffer from chronic fatigue, sleep disorders, trouble getting out of bed in the morning, depression, low energy, cannot recuperate/regain energy levels, lack of endurance, decreased libido, weight gain/loss,feeling rundown or overwhelmed, craving salty and sweet foods, low stamina, slow to recover from exercise, slow to recover from injury, illness or stress, difficulty concentrating, brain fog, poor digestion low immune function, food or environmental allergies, premenstrual syndrome or difficulties that develop during menopause, consistent low blood pressure, extreme sensitivity to cold and trouble handling stress(physical/emotional).

Causes:
Adrenal fatigue is not typically said to be caused by one source, rather a host of lifestyle factors that supposedly contribute to adrenal fatigue as a whole. Such contributing factors include: stress (physical and emotional), poor diet, lack of exercise, significant use of stimulants (caffeine, nicotine, amphetamines), lack of refreshing sleep, lack of relaxation, illness, being overworked, being post-surgery, as well as other stressors.

Adrenal stress is claimed to tend to occur suddenly after a serious illness or stressful point in life.
Diagnosis:
Adrenal insufficiency can be difficult to diagnose. Your doctor will begin by asking about your medical history and about any obvious symptoms you are experiencing.

Tests that measure the levels of cortisol and aldosterone are used to make a definite diagnosis and include the following:

*ACTH Stimulation Test — This is the most specific test for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency. Blood cortisol levels are measured before and after a synthetic form of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), a hormone secreted from the anterior pituitary, is given by injection.

*Insulin-Induced Hypoglycemia Test –– The insulin-induced hypoglycemia test is used to determine how the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands respond to stress. During this test, blood is drawn to measure the blood glucose and cortisol levels, followed by an injection of fast-acting insulin. Blood glucose and cortisol levels are measured again 30, 45 and 90 minutes after the insulin injection. The normal response is for blood glucose levels to fall (this represents the stress) and cortisol levels to rise.

Other Tests:
Once a diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency has been made, a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen may be taken to see if the adrenal glands are diminished in size, reflecting destruction, or enlarged, reflecting infiltration by some independent disease process. The scan also may show signs of calcium deposits, which may indicate previous exposure to tuberculosis. A tuberculin skin test may be used to address the latter possibility.

A number of imaging tools may be used to examine the size and shape of the pituitary gland. The most common is the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, which produces a series of images that provide a cross-sectional picture of the pituitary and the area of the brain that surrounds it.

In addition, the function of the pituitary and its ability to produce other hormones are tested. Typically, measurements of ACTH — the pituitary hormone most relevant for maintenance of normal adrenal function — along with thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and prolactin are made under resting conditions and following provocative simulation, such as following the administration of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH), which leads to an increase in ACTH levels under normal conditions.
Treatment:

Naturopathic Treatment:
According to various “specialists”, usually naturopaths, adrenal fatigue can be treated and reversed with proper lifestyle changes and dietary considerations. By leading a lifestyle more conducive to a healthy lifestyle, avoiding stressful situations, and eating a balanced diet, the adrenal glands can supposedly repair themselves and return to proper functioning. There is wide acceptance among the supplement-makers for adrenal fatigue that the most important nutrient deficiencies are vitamin C, pantothenic acid, vitamin B5. Of the claimed herbal remedies it is worth mentioning licorice, that has a claimed effect of slowing down the breakdown of cortisol. This is said to keep more cortisol in the body, thus relieving some symptoms of adrenal fatigue.

The naturopathic treatment is known as a “long road”, with lots of ups-and-downs, and the way to recovery is said to long and difficult. However, naturopaths consider this more “healthy” since it is based on “healing the body”, rather than simply replacing the missing hormones.

You may click to see:->Articles about “natural thyroid treatments”

Drug Treatment:
Of great supposed importance to treatment of adrenal fatigue is the adrenal hormone cortisol. It is generally recommended by alternative medicine practitioners that in severe cases of adrenal fatigue, the patient should consume low-doses of cortisol for quick relief of symptoms. This also supposedly (never proven) allows the adrenal glands time to heal themselves, and then the person can wean himself off cortisol.

If there are other hormonal deficiencies, they should be corrected as well using either HRT or supporting nutrients (this includes a malfunctioning thyroid gland, and the sex hormones). The medical treatment (using cortisol mostly) is claimed to be quick and efficient, with no noticeable side effects. However most medical doctors tread this treatment as dangerous. This results from the fact that cortisol is usually given in very high doses (~300mg/day) to relief various serious illnesses, resulting in very serious side effects. The doctors believe that giving low dosages (~20-30mg/day) would bear the same side effects, only taking longer. However, in one research paper it has been shown that low dosages of cortisol (<15mg/day) or low dosages of prednisone (<10mg/day) bear no long-time or short-term side effects in the patients, even at long term treatment.

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Herbal Treatment:
YOU can protect against adrenal stress with symptoms that include blood sugar swings, low energy, weakness, lethargy, dizziness, headaches, memory problems, food cravings, allergies, Addison’s disease and Cushing’s syndrome with the herbs like:Milk thistle guaranteed-potency extract, licorice root, eleuthero root, suma root, astragalus.

Criticisms:
As of 2008, adrenal fatigue is not an accepted medical diagnosis. It has gained popularity primarily through alternative-medicine books which claim to offer cures for this “disorder”, which is allegedly ignored by the mainstream medical community.

The term adrenal fatigue may also refer to:->

Addison’s Disease
Hypoadrenia
chronic fatigue syndrome

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.This is purely for educational purpose.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrenal_fatigue
http://herbnews.org/adrenaldone.htm

http://www.ucsfhealth.org/adult/medical_services/hormone/adrenal/conditions/insufficiency/diagnosis.html

Cause, Effect, And Transformation

Feeling Depleted
There are times in our lives when it seems our bodies are running on empty. We are not sick, nor are we necessarily pushing ourselves to the limit-rather, the energy we typical enjoy has mysteriously dissipated, leaving only fatigue. Many people grow accustomed to feeling this way because they do not know that it is possible to exist in any other state. The body’s natural state, however, is one of energy, clarity, and balance. Cultivating these virtues in our own bodies so that we can combat feelings of depletion is a matter of developing a refined awareness of the self and then making changes based on our observations.

A few scant moments of focused self-examination in which you assess your recent schedule, diet, and general health may help you zero in on the factors causing your depletion. If you are struggling to cope with an overfull agenda, prioritization can provide you with more time to sleep and otherwise refresh yourself. Switching to a diet containing plenty of nutritious foods may serve to restore your vigor, especially when augmented by supplements like B vitamins or ginseng. Consider, too, that a visit to a healer or homeopath will likely provide you with wonderful insights into your tiredness. But identifying the source of your exhaustion will occasionally be more complicated than spotting a void in your lifestyle and filling it with some form of literal nourishment. Since your earthly and ethereal forms are so intimately entwined, matters of the mind and heart can take their toll on your physical self. Intense emotions such as anger, sadness, jealousy, and regret need fuel to! manifest in your consciousness, and this fuel is more often than not corporeal energy. Conversely, a lack of mental and emotional stimulation may leave you feeling listless and lethargic.

Coping with and healing physical depletion will be easier when you accept that the underlying cause might be more complex than you at first imagined. A harried lifestyle or a diet low in vital nutrients can represent only one part of a larger issue affecting your mood, stamina, and energy levels. When you believe that you are ultimately in control of how you feel, you will be empowered to transform yourself and your day-to-day life so that lasting fatigue can no longer gain a foothold in your existence.

Source:Daily Om

What Causes Stress?

Regardless of the cause, stress sets in motion certain automatic changes in the body that are designed to give it a quick burst of energy. The pattern of changes has been called the “fight-or-flight” response because it most likely evolved from our prehistoric ancestors, who faced daily dangers in their search for food and shelter and had to either flee or do battle. Of course, we no longer face such dangers, but our bodies continue to react as if we did. So instead of responding to a saber-tooth tiger lurking behind a tree, the body reacts to petty annoyances like getting caught in traffic, being reprimanded by a supervisor, or worrying about bills.

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Regardless of the type of stress, the body goes through the following changes:

1.The adrenal glands release adrenaline and other stress hormones that prime certain organs to go into action.
2.The breathing becomes faster and more shallow to allow the body to take in more oxygen.
3.The liver releases more glucose (blood sugar) to provide extra energy.

4.The heart beats faster and blood pressure rises to increase the distribution of oxygen and nutrients throughout the body.
5.Blood flow to the brain and muscles is increased and, at the same time, reduced to digestive organs.
6.Sweating increases to allow the body to burn more calories without a rise in body temperature. (In theory, sweating also makes the skin slippery and more difficult for a predator to grab.)

After the stressor disappears, the body returns to its normal state (homeostasis). If, however, stress is chronic — as it is for many people — the body stays on high alert. The many damaging consequences include a rise in cholesterol levels, high blood pressure, damaged blood vessels, decreased mental skills, and a weakened immune system.

Source:Reader’s Digest