Tag Archives: Advanced Placement

Saussurea obvallata

 

Botanical Name : Saussurea obvallata
Family: Asteraceae or Compositae
Tribe: Cynareae
Genus: Saussurea
Species: S. obvallata
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales

Common Names; Local names of this flower are Brahma Kamal, Kon and Kapfu .

Habitat : Saussurea obvallata is native to E. Asia – western Himalayas from Kashmir to Sikkim at elevations of 3,000 – 4,500 metres. It grows on alpine meadows and slopes, rocky slopes
and along the sides of rivers and streams.

Description:
Saussurea obvallata is a perennial plant, growing to 0.3 m (1 ft). The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects. Flowers bloom in mid-
monsoon (July– August) amongst the rocks and grasses of the hillside at an altitudinal range of 3000–4800 m. Flower heads are purple,hidden from view in layers of yellowish-green papery
bracts, which provide protection from the cold mountain environment. The flowers can be seen till mid-October, after which the plant perishes, becoming visible again in April. It is the state
flower of Uttarakhand. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.
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Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist
soil.

In Hindu drawings Brahma is seen sitting on a pink flower that resembles a lotus (Sanskrit: kamal), which is India’s national flower. Hence people claim that the pink flower of Nelumbo
nucifera is the Brahma Kamal. However others claim the flower on which he is sitting, which resembles a lotus is sprouted from the belly button of Lord Vishnu. The flower which Brahma is
holding in one of his four hands, a white flower resembling Saussurea obvallata is the Brahma Kamal. There are people who claim that the flower of Epiphyllum oxypetalum, the orchid
cactus, which blooms at night, is the Brahma Kamal. Some North Indians claim that the flower of Saussurea obvallata is the Brahma Kamal.

Cultivation: 
Succeeds in most soils in a sunny well-drained position.

Propagation :
Seed – we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a cold frame in the spring. Surface sow, or only just cover the seed, and make sure that the compost does not dry   out. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter. Plant them out in late spring    after the last expected frosts. Division in spring might be possible.

Medicinal Uses:
Brahma kamal is a medicinal herb. The plant is considered an herb in Tibetan medicine. Its name is Sah-du Goh-ghoo. It has a bitter taste. The entire plant is used. It is found in the region
of the Himalayas. It is also used to cure urogenital disorders. It is used in the treatment of paralysis of the limbs and cerebral ischaemia.

Other Uses:
Uttarakhand formerly Uttaranchal, is a state located in the northern part of India. It is often referred to as the Land of Gods – Dev Bhumi due to the many holy Hindu temples and cities found      throughout the state which are some of Hinduism’s most spiritual and auspicious places of pilgrimage and worship. The shrines of Yamunotri, Gangotri, Kedarnath and Badrinath make up     the Char Dham Yatra, four highly sacred destinations of the Hindus. Uttarakhand also known for its natural beauty.

Known Hazards: It is endangered because people are cutting it down for their own use.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with     your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thelesperma_megapotamicum
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Thelesperma+megapotamicum

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Teucrium scordium

Botanical Name: Teucrium scordium
Family: Lamiaceae
Subfamily: Ajugoideae
Genus: Teucrium
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Common Name: Water Germander

Habitat: Teucrium scordium is native to Europe, including Britain, from Sweden south and east to France, W. Siberia and Serbia. It grows on the Banks of rivers and ditches on calcareous soils and on dune slacks. A rare plant in Britain.

Description:
Teucrium scordium is a perennial plant growing to 0.6 m (2ft). It is in flower from Jul to September, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, self.The plant is self-fertile.

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The square, hairy stalks, are of a dirty green colour and very weak. The leaves are short, broad, woolly and soft, and indented at the edges. The flowers are small, of a purplish-rose colour, in whorls, in the axils of the leaves. It flowers in July and August.

The whole plant is bitter and slightly aromatic.

The fresh leaves, when rubbed, have a penetrating odour, like Garlic, and it is said that when cows eat it through hunger, it gives the flavour of Garlic to their milk.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in any moderately good soil. See notes on the plants habitat for more ideas on its needs. Water germander was at one time cultivated in gardens as a medicinal herb, though it has fallen into disuse. The crushed plant has a penetrating odour that is somewhat like garlic. It is said to taint the milk if eaten by cows.

Propagation:
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame and only just cover the seed. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer if they are large enough. Otherwise, grow them on in a cold frame for the winter and plant them out in the following spring. Division in early spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.

Medicinal Uses:
Anthelmintic; Antidiarrhoeal; Antifungal; Antiseptic; Diaphoretic; Skin; TB; Tonic.

The herb is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiseptic, diaphoretic, skin, tonic. Water germander was at one time esteemed as an antidote for poisons and also as an antiseptic and anthelmintic, though it is scarcely used nowadays. However, its tonic and diaphoretic actions make it an excellent remedy for all inflammatory diseases. It us also used in the treatment of TB.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teucrium
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/g/gerwat12.html
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Teucrium+scordium

Eugenia chequen

Botanical Name : Eugenia chequen
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Luma
Species: L. chequen
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Myrtales

Synonyms :  Eugenia chequen Molina, Myrtus chequen (Molina) Spreng., and Luma gayana (Barn.)

Common Names :Chequén, Huillipeta, and Arrayán Blanco (White Myrtle).

Other Names: Arryan, Chekan, Chequén, Eugenia chequen, Luma chequen, Mirte, Myrte du Chili, Myrte du Chili Blanc, Myrtus, Myrtus chequen.

Habitat :Eugenia chequen is native to the central Andes mountains between Chile and Argentina.It has been introduced as ornamental in the North Pacific Coast of the United States.

Description:
It is a shrub (rarely a small tree) growing to 9 m tall, with dull grey-brown bark (unlike the smooth red bark of the related Luma apiculata). It is evergreen, with small fragrant oval leaves 0.5-2.5 cm long and 0.3-1.5 cm broad, and white flowers in early to mid summer. Its fruit is an edible dark purple berry 1 cm in diameter, ripe in early autumn.

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Medicinal Uses:
Most useful in the chronic bronchitis of elderly people and in chronic catarrh of the respiratory organs. People take leaf preparations for diarrhea, fever, gout, high blood pressure, fluid retention, and cough. Cheken leaf oil might affect the way the body breaks down fat and could be useful in lowering high triglycerides, a type of blood fat.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luma_chequen
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/5390791

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-401-CHEKEN.aspx?activeIngredientId=401&activeIngredientName=CHEKEN

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Oenanthe aquatica

Botanical Name : Oenanthe aquatica
Family : Apiaceae – Carrot family
Genus : Oenanthe L. – waterdropwort
Species : Oenanthe aquatica (L.) Poir. – fineleaf waterdropwort
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom : Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision ; Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division : Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class :Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass: Rosidae
Order : Apiales

Synonyms :  Oenanthe phellandrium. Phellandrium aquaticum

Common Name : Water Dropwort, Water Fennel

Habitat :Water Dropwort  seen  in   Europe, including Britain, though absent from the far north, to W. Asia.It grows in slow moving or stagnant water, and by the sides of streams, avoiding acid conditions.

Description:
Oenanthe aquatica is a perennial plant, growing to 1.5 m (5ft). It is in flower from Jun to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, beetles.The plant is self-fertile.

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The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It cannot grow in the shade.It requires wet soil and can grow in water.

Cultivation:
Requires shallow water or a very wet fertile soil. Individual plants are biennial, dying after flowering. The plant perrenates, however, by means of offsets.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring or late summer in situ.

Medicinal Uses:
Antiperiodic;  Diaphoretic;  Diuretic;  Expectorant;  Homeopathy;  Narcotic;  Pectoral.

The fruit is antiperiodic, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant and pectoral. It is used in the treatment of chronic pectoral affections, dyspepsia, intermittent fevers, obstinate ulcers etc. This plant should be used with great caution, and only under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. In overdose the fruits cause vertigo, intoxication and other narcotic effects. The roots have been used externally in the treatment of piles. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fruits. It is used in the treatment of bronchitis, coughs etc.

It is used in the treatment of chronic pectoral affections, dyspepsia, intermittent fevers, obstinate ulcers etc. This plant should be used with great caution, and only under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. In overdose the fruits cause vertigo, intoxication and other narcotic effects. The roots have been used externally in the treatment of piles. A homeopathic remedy is made from the fruits. It is used in the treatment of bronchitis, coughs etc.  The seeds have been most successfully used in chronic affections of the air-passages, as laryngitis, asthma, hemoptysis, catarrh, etc.; also in periodical febrile diseases, dyspeptic affections, and in indolent ulcerations.  It is used in consumption and bronchitis, to relieve troublesome cough, render expectoration less and easier, and produce sleep at night.

Known Hazards : All parts of the plant are poisonous. It is said to contain the alleged ‘psychotroph’ myristicine

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Oenanthe+aquatica
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=OEAQ
http://species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Oenanthe_aquatica
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_UZ.htm

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