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Herbs & Plants

Symplocos paniculata

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Botanical Name : Symplocos paniculata
Family: Symplocaceae
Genus: Symplocos
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Ericales

Common Names: Asiatic Sweetleaf, Sapphire-berry

Habitat :Symplocos paniculata is native to E. Asia – China, Japan, Korea, Himalayas. It grows in the forests and shrubberies at elevations of 1000 – 2700 metres, Pakistan to S. W. China and Burma. Slopes in mixed forests at elevations of 800 – 2500 metres.

Description:
Symplocos paniculata is a deciduous Shrub growing to 4 m (13ft) by 4 m (13ft).

It is in flower from May to June, and the seeds ripen from Oct to December. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs)The plant is not self-fertile. ...CLICK  & SEE  THE  PICTURES  
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid soils and can grow in very acid soils.
It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
Requires an acid soil and a sunny position. Succeeds in a sunny position in any well-drained fertile neutral to acid soil. One report says that plants are hardy to about -10°c, though it is also said that they can survive quite harsh winters outdoors in Britain but that they need a warm, sunny protected position and a hot summer if they are to fruit well. The fruits are sometimes spoiled by frosts. The flowers are sweetly fragrant. Self-sterile, it needs cross-pollination with a different plant in the same species if seed and fruit are to be produced. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus.

Propagation:
Seed – best sown in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe. Stored seed requires stratification and is best sown in a cold frame in late winter, it can take 12 months to germinate. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the cold frame for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7 – 10cm with a heel, July/August in individual pots in a cold frame. Roots are formed in about 4 weeks. Good percentage.
Edible Uses:... Fruit – cooked. Used in jams, jellies and sauce[183]. The fruit is about 8mm in diameter.

Medicinal Uses:
The bark is astringent, cooling and tonic. It is useful in the treatment of menorrhagia, bowel complaints, eye diseases and ulcers. It is also used as a gargle for giving firmness to spongy and bleeding gums. The juice of the bark is applied externally to sprains and muscular swellings.
Other Uses: …Dye; Mordant; Wood…..A yellow or red dye is obtained from the leaves and bark. We have no specific information for this species but many species in this genus contain alum and can be used as mordants when dyeing. Wood – white, soft to moderately hard. close grained, liable to twist and split when seasoning. Of possible use in turnery.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symplocos
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Symplocos+paniculata

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Herbs & Plants

Rubus argutus

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Botanical Name : Rubus argutus
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Species:R. argutus
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Names: Highbush Blackberry, Sawtooth blackberry or Tall blackberry

Habitat :Rubus argutus is native to Eastern N. America – Massachusetts to Virginia. It grows on dry or moist thickets and woodland margins.

Description:
Rubus argutus is a deciduous Shrub growing to 2.5 m (8ft 2in). It is an erect, arching, or trailing shrub in the Rose family (Rosaceae). Stems are usually erect to arching in open areas and arching to trailing or decumbent in shaded areas. Primocanes (first year stems) are angled, 1-3 m long. Prickles are hooked or straight, up to 8 mm long. Leaves are palmately compound, typically with 3, sometimes 5 leaflets. Leaflets are elliptic, oblong-oblanceolate, or ovate. Terminal leaflet is 8-13 cm long and 3-8 cm wide. Leaflets are hairless on upper surface with soft, long hairs on lower surface. Leaflet margin is coarsely toothed. Prickles and leaves on floricanes (second year stems) are similar to primocanes but smaller. Flowers are arranged in short racemes on pedicels 1.5-5.0 cm long. Petals are white, 13-20 mm long. Fruit is black when mature, adhering to receptacle.

CLICK & SEE THE  PICTURES
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of the country. This species is cultivated for its edible fruit in N. America. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade. Plants in this genus are notably susceptible to honey fungus.
Propagation:
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Tip layering in July. Plant out in autumn. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn.

Edible Uses: …Fruit – raw or cooked. Variable in size and quality but generally with rather large and juicy drupelets. The pulpy fruit is up to 25mm long.
Medicinal Uses:

Antihaemorrhoidal; Antirheumatic; Astringent; Stimulant; Tonic.

The roots are antihaemorrhoidal, antirheumatic, astringent, stimulant and tonic. An infusion can be used in the treatment of venereal disease and as a wash in the treatment of piles. An infusion of the roots or leaves can be used in the treatment of diarrhoea and rheumatism.

Other Uses : Dye…..A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_argutus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+argutus

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Herbs & Plants

Rubus acaulis

Botanical Name : Rubus acaulis
Family: Rosaceae
Genus: Rubus
Subgenus:Cyclactis
Species:R. arcticus
Kingdom:Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Names: Dwarf Raspberry,Rubus arcticus, the Arctic bramble or Arctic raspberry

Habitat : Rubus acaulis is native to Northern N. America – Labrador to Alaska, south to Colorado and southern British Columbia. It grows on damp soils.

Description:
Rubus acaulis is a perennial plant growing to 0.1 m (0ft 4in) by 0.5 m (1ft 8in).

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of this country. It is closely related to R. arcticus, and is included in that species by some botanists. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a good well-drained loamy soil in sun or semi-shade.
Propagation:
Seed – requires stratification and is best sown in early autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed requires one month stratification at about 3°c and is best sown as early as possible in the year. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a cold frame. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring of the following year. Division in early spring or just before leaf-fall in the autumn
Edible Uses: ..Fruit – raw or cooked. Richly flavoured, it is similar to R. arcticus but with smaller and more numerous drupelets.
Medicinal Uses:
Astringent.
The leaves are astringent and have been used in the treatment of diarrhoea.

Other Uses: Dye…A purple to dull blue dye is obtained from the fruit.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Rubus+acaulis
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubus_arcticus

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Herbs & Plants

Orchis italica

 

Botanical Name : Orchis italica
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily:Orchidoideae
Tribe: Orchidae
Subtribe:Orchidinae
Alliance:Orchis
Genus: Orchis
Species:O. italica
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Names: Naked man orchid or the Italian orchid

Habitat :Orchis italica is native to the Mediterranean. It grows on calcareous soils in grassland, garigue and open places in pine woodland.
Description:
Orchis italica is a  bulb .It grows up to 50cm in height and has a rosette of distinctive wavy-margined leaves at the base of the plant. The leaves are sometimes flecked with brown. There are a further 3 or 4 small leaves sheathing the stem. The flowers are carried in a dense inflorescence and are usually pale to dark pink. From time to time pure white specimens occur but they are rare.
It is not frost tender. It is in leaf 6-Oct It is in flower from Apr to May. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very alkaline soils.It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES 

Edible Uses:
Root – cooked. It is a source of ‘salep‘, a fine white to yellowish-white powder that is obtained by drying the tuber and grinding it into a powder. Salep is a starch-like substance with a sweetish taste and a faint somewhat unpleasant smell. It is said to be very nutritious and is made into a drink or can be added to cereals and used in making bread etc. One ounce of salep is said to be enough to sustain a person for a day.
Medicinal Uses:

Antidiarrhoeal; Antiflatulent; Demulcent; Nutritive.

Salep (see above for more details) is very nutritive and demulcent. It has been used as a diet of special value for children and convalescents, being boiled with water, flavoured and prepared in the same way as arrowroot. Rich in mucilage, it forms a soothing and demulcent jelly that is used in the treatment of irritations of the gastro-intestinal canal. One part of salep to fifty parts of water is sufficient to make a jelly. The tuber, from which salep is prepared, should be harvested as the plant dies down after flowering and setting seed

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchis_italica
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Orchis+italica
http://www.first-nature.com/flowers/orchis-italica.php

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Herbs & Plants

Artemisia sieversiana

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Botanical Name :Artemisia sieversiana
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus : Artemisia
Species:A. sieversiana

Common names: Sievers wormwood

Habitat :Artemisia sieversiana is native to E. Asia – Himalayas from Pakistan to C. Nepal. It grows on stony ground, especially in Ladakh, and also in dry areas of Nepal, 1500 – 4100 metres.

Description:
Artemisia sieversiana is a annual/perennial plant, growing to 0.8 m (2ft 6in). Leaves are more or less triangular in outline with more acute leaf lobes and a deeply grooved, nearly angled stem. It is in flower from Aug to October, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

It is well-known for instance in the Czech Republic (Hejný 1964) and Ukrain (Mosyakin 1990).
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a warm sunny dry position. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation :
Seed – surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse, making sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring or autumn. Basal cuttings in late spring. Harvest the young shoots when about10 – 15cm long, pot up in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse or cold frame and plant them out when well rooted. Very easy.
Edible Uses: One report says that the plant is edible but does not say what part of the plant.

Medicinal Uses:

Anthelmintic; Antirheumatic; Antiseptic; Deobstruent; Emmenagogue; Febrifuge; Skin; Tonic.

The leaves and flowering stems are anthelmintic, deobstruent, emmenagogue, febrifuge and tonic. Externally, they are used as an antiseptic and discutient. A decoction of the plant, combined with Ajuga lupulina and Ephedra gerardiana, is used as a wash to relieve painful joints. A paste of the roots is applied to boils.
Known Hazards: Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, skin contact with some members of this genus can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some people.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Artemisia+sieversiana
https://vi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_sieversiana
http://www.nies.go.jp/biodiversity/invasive/DB/detail/80430e.html
http://alienplantsbelgium.be/content/artemisia-sieversiana