Categories
Herbs & Plants

Lupinus albus

[amazon_link asins=’B01FTT7IU6,B00X8K5R2U,B00087LJ3C,B018WLOZ36,B003Z58OT6,B01FP7F0GQ,B00W6LTQAQ,B00DL0BJH4,B00DNA35K6′ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6df8c3d8-8f98-11e7-8e9c-e30d30cc9b59′]

Botanical Name : Lupinus albus
Family: Fabaceae
Genus:     Lupinus
Species: L. albus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order:     Fabales

Synonyms: (French) Lupin. (German) Wolfsbohne.

Common Names :Lupin or white lupin

Habitat : Lupinus albus  has a wide distribution in the Mediterranean region.It is widely spread as wild plants throughout the southern Balkans, the islands of Sicily, Corsica and Sardinia, and the Aegean Sea, as well as in Israel, Palestine and western Turkey. Occurs in meadows, pastures, and grassy slopes, predominantly on sandy and acid soils.

Description:
Lupinus albus is an annual plant  growing to 1.2 m (4ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in). It is in flower from Jun to July, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It can fix Nitrogen……..CLICK  &  SEE THE  PICTURES

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Oil;  Oil;  Seed.
Edible Uses: Coffee;  Oil;  Oil.

Seed – cooked. Used as a protein-rich vegetable or savoury dish in any of the ways that cooked beans are used, they can also be roasted or ground into a powder and mixed with cereal flours in making bread etc. If the seed is bitter this is due to the presence of toxic alkaloids and the seed should be thoroughly leached by soaking it and then discarding the soak water before cooking. Seeds contain 32 – 40% protein, 8 – 12% oil. The roasted seeds can be used as a snack in much the same way as peanuts. An edible oil is obtained from the seed. The roasted seed is used as a coffee substitute.

Medicinal Uses:

Parts Used-:  Seeds, herb.

Diuretic;  Emmenagogue;  Hypoglycaemic;  Vermifuge.

The seeds, taken internally, are diuretic, emmenagogue, hypoglycaemic and vermifuge. When bruised and soaked in water they are used as a poultice on ulcers etc.

Other Uses
Cosmetic;  Fibre;  Green manure;  Oil;  Oil.

The seed contains up to 12% oil. This is used in making soap. A fibre obtained from the stems is used for making cloth etc[4]. A cosmetic face-mask can be made from lupin flour, this is used to invigorate tired skin. A useful spring-sown green manure crop, especially on light soils. It is deep rooting, fairly fast growing, produces a good bulk and fixes atmospheric nitrogen

Known Hazards:  The seed of many lupin species contain bitter-tasting toxic alkaloids, though there are often sweet varieties within that species that are completely wholesome. Taste is a very clear indicator. These toxic alkaloids can be leeched out of the seed by soaking it overnight and discarding the soak water. It may also be necessary to change the water once during cooking. Fungal toxins also readily invade the crushed seed and can cause chronic illness

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/l/lupins50.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lupinus_albus
http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Lupinus+albus

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Trifolium incarnatum

[amazon_link asins=’B004HKPYGO,B004YQ4412,B0055WMNVW,B0055WMNVW,B00UA2ALIY,B00B8B7170,B00DMJ1XC0,B01BP6GOYI,B006J68Q32,B01M364FDD’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’3168b724-0a10-11e7-ac07-35aa417b4081′]

Botanical Name : Trifolium incarnatum
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Faboideae
Genus: Trifolium
Species: T. incarnatum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Fabales

Common Names :Crimson clover or Italian clover (The species name incarnatum means “blood red”.)

Habitat :Trifolium incarnatum is  native to most of Europe.(Mainly western and southern Europe, including Britain, to the Balkans and the Mediterranean.) Grows in  grassy places near the Lizard peninsula in Cornwall.

Description:
Trifolium incarnatum is a upright annual herb grows to 20-50 cm tall at a medium rate, unbranched or branched only at the base. The leaves are trifoliate with a long petiole, each leaflet hairy, 8-16 mm across, with a truncated or bilobed apex. The flowers are produced throughout the spring and summer, rich red or crimson, congested on an elongated spike inflorescence 3-5 cm tall and 1.5 cm broad; the individual flowers are up to 10-13 mm long and have five petals. The banner of each flower does not sit upright, but folds forward.

You may click to see different pictures of Trifolium incarnatum

It is hardy to zone 0 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to September, and the seeds ripen from July to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees. The plant is self-fertile. It can fix Nitrogen.
The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It requires moist soil. The plant can tolerates strong winds but not maritime exposure.

Cultivation :
Succeeds in a moist, well-drained circum-neutral soil in full sun. Succeeds in poor soils. The ssp. molinerli is the form of this species that is native to Britain, whilst ssp. incarnatum is naturalized in S. Britain and is the form grown as a green manure crop. It grows well in an apple orchard, the trees will produce tastier fruit that stores better. It should not be grown with camellias or gooseberries because it harbours a mite that can cause fruit drop in the gooseberries and premature budding in the camellias. Fairly resistant to ‘clover rot’. This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby. Buttercups growing nearby depress the growth of the nitrogen bacteria by means of a root exudate. When removing plant remains at the end of the growing season, it is best to only remove the aerial parts of the plant, leaving the roots in the ground to decay and release their nitrogen.

Propagation:
Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in spring to early summer in situ. The seed can also be sown in early autumn as a winter green manure.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Seed.

Edible Uses: Tea.

The seeds can be sprouted and eaten in salads. They can also be dried and ground into a nutritious flour. Dried flower heads are a tea substitute.

Medicinal Uses:
Leaves are made into a strong infusion to suspend the spasms of whooping cough or into a salve for indolent sores.

Other Uses:
Green manure; Soil reclamation.

Used as a green manure. It is relatively fast growing, makes an excellent weed suppressing cover and fixes nitrogen. It is also used with grass seed mixes in soil reclamation projects.

Crimson clover is widely grown as a protein-rich forage crop for cattle and other livestock. It can typically be found in forest margins, fields and roadsides.

It is sown as quickly as possible after the removal of a grain crop at the rate of 20-22 kg/ha. It is found to succeed better when only the surface of the soil is stirred by the scarifier and harrow than when a plowing is given. It grows rapidly in spring, and yields an abundant crop of green food, particularly palatable to live stock. It is also suitable for making into hay. Only one cutting, however, can be obtained, as it does not shoot again after being mown.

In Great Britain it is most valuable in the south, though less successful in northern regions.

It has been introduced into the United States, originally as forage for cattle. It is often used for roadside erosion control, as well as beautification; it tends, however, to eliminate all other desirable spring and early-summer species of native vegetation in the area where it is planted.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Trifolium+incarnatum
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trifolium_incarnatum
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_C.htm

Categories
Herbs & Plants

Cardamine amara

[amazon_link asins=’B073C8RN5N,B06X17411G,B073C8QKD2,B073C6M2BM,B073C7TXSQ,B01NA0OIF4,B01N819F1Z’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’45d68b45-9dbc-11e7-8e6b-3d561815bd1b’]

Botanical Name ; Cardamine amara
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Cardamine
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Brassicales

Common Names: Bitter Cress or Large Bittercress

Habitat ;Cardamine amara is native to  Most of Europe, including Britain, north to 64° N., east to the Balkans and W. Asia.
Grows  by springs, in fens and on streamsides, preferring a peaty soil. Often found in trickling water. Often the dominant ground flora in alder woods with moving damp water.

Description:
Cardamine amara is a  perennial herb  growing to 0.6m. The leaves can have different forms, going from minute to medium-sized. They can be pinnate or bipinnate. They are basal and cauline (growing on the upper part of the stem), with narrow tips. They are rosulate (forming a rosette). The blade margins can be entire, serrate or dentate. The stem internodes lack firmness.

CLICK  & SEE THE PICTURES

The radially symmetrical flowers grow in a racemose many-flowered inflorescence or in corymbs. The white, pink or purple flowers are minute to medium-sized. The petals are longer than the sepals. The fertile flowers are hermaphroditic.

The fruits are long, thin dehiscent pods with many (20-100) seeds. In some regions this plant is considered a nuisance; one author observes, “Weeding this little pest is decidedly unsatisfying, for when its fully ripe pods are touched, they split open and shoot out their seeds, thus spitefully sowing another crop.”

It is hardy to zone 5 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from April to June, and the seeds ripen from May to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, beetles, Lepidoptera (Moths & Butterflies). The plant is self-fertile.

Cultivation :Easily grown in most moist soils. Prefers a moist humus rich soil in shade or semi-shade. Plants are hardy to at least -20°c. An invasive plant spreading freely by self-sowing, it is best suited to the wild garden. A polymorphic species.

Propagation: Seed – sow outdoors in situ in a shady position in April.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It requires moist soil.

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Leaves.

Leaves – raw. A hot cress-like flavour, nice in small quantities in a salad and available all year round in most years. A somewhat bitter flavour.

Medicinal Uses
Antiscorbutic; Diuretic; Stimulant.Used medicinally since early times as a stomachic

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

 

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardamine
http://digedibles.com/database/plants.php?Cardamine+amara
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://luirig.altervista.org/schedeit/ae/cardamine_amara.htm

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Asphodelus albus

[amazon_link asins=’0822312425,B00S3S7V9O,0771073542,B00F8W9H0O,B00EYN8NPI,0811212831,B00P6O50B4,B0751793TM,B00DYZE2SO’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’3d7413d9-9cf4-11e7-8563-0342a4d54ef7′]

[amazon_link asins=’B074DVKPKY’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’0c3ee113-9cf4-11e7-83be-7553be96ed96′]

Botanical Name : Asphodelus albus
Family: Xanthorrhoeaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Genus: Asphodelus
Species: A. albus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Asparagales

Common Names :White asphodel,Asphodel

Habitat : Asphodelus albus is native to the Mediterranean area.(S. Europe. ) The plant is commonly found in meadows and heathland of central Spain, southwest France, and along the southern Alps to the western Balkans up to an altitude of 2,000 metres (6,600 ft). It is also found on the continent Africa, mainly in Libyan territory. Soils with a high lime content are preferred.

Description:
Asphodelus albus is a herbaceous perennial plant.  It grows to a height of 50–120 centimetres (20–47 in). The plain stem is supported by fleshy, thickened roots (rhizomes). The leaves, which originate from the base of the stem, are gutter-shaped and glaucous (covered by a waxy coating), about 20–22 millimetres (0.79–0.87 in) wide and 50–70 centimetres (20–28 in) long. The white hermaphroditic flowers are funnel-shaped, 4 centimetres (1.6 in) of diameter, with six elongated petals. The flowering period extends from April through June. The egg-shaped yellow-green seed capsules are usually 8–10 millimetres (0.31–0.39 in) in length.

Cloick to see..>.(01).……..(1).....(2)....(3)……..(4).….

It is hardy to zone 6 and is not frost tender. It is in flower from May to June. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.

The plant prefers light (sandy) and medium (loamy) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.

Cultivation:
Succeeds in ordinary garden soil, tolerating partial shade. Requires a well-drained soil and a sheltered position. Prefers a deep rich sandy loamy soil. Prefers a soil that is not too rich and a sunny position. Grows well on hot dry banks and in thin grass. Established plants are drought tolerant. Plants are hardy to about -15°c. Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits.

Propagation:
Seed – sow March/April in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place in 1 – 3 months at 15°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. When the plants are large enough to handle, plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Division in early spring or autumn

Edible Uses:
Edible Parts: Root.
The root was at one time eaten as a food but, since it contains the alkaloid asphodeline, this is not really very advisable.

Medicinal Uses:
Antidermatosic;  Detergent;  EmollientVulnerary.

The tubers are antidermatosic, detergent, emollient and vulnerary. They are mainly used externally in the treatment of skin conditions and for lightening freckles. They have also been employed internally as a cough remedy. The tubers are harvested in the spring and dried for later use. Use internally with caution, especially if you are suffering from nephritis or gastritis.

Other Uses :
An alcohol can be obtained from the fermented roots.

Known Hazards: The root is poisonous

Disclaimer:The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider

Resources:
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Asphodelus+albus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asphodelus_albus

Enhanced by Zemanta
Categories
Herbs & Plants

Dracunculus vulgaris

[amazon_link asins=’B01AS4YCHY,B01HR9VS8E’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’finmeacur-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’591aa6c7-1c11-11e7-ae25-4baf9455bb49′]

Botanical Name:Dracunculus vulgaris
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Alismatales
Family: Araceae
Subfamily: Aroideae
Tribe: Areae
Genus: Dracunculus
Species: D. vulgaris

Common Names: Dragon Arum, the Black Arum, the Voodoo Lily, the Snake Lily, the Stink Lily, the Black Dragon, the Black Lily, Dragonwort, and Ragons.

Habitat:Dracunculus vulgaris is native to the Balkans, extending as far as Greece, Crete and the Aegean Islands, and also to the south-western parts of Anatolia.. It has been introduced to the United States and is currently present in the states of Oregon, California, Camano Island, Washington and Tennessee as well as the commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

CLICK & SEE THE PICTURES

Description:

Dragon arum is a tuberous herbaceous perennial plant that is native to rocky areas and hillsides in the central to eastern Mediterranean areas from Greece to the Balkans to Turkey. It typically grows to 3′ tall and features large, erect, fan-shaped, palmately-divided, dark green leaves (to 12″ long) that are often streaked with white. Each leaf has 9-15 finger-like lobes reportedly resembling in appearance the claw of a dragon, hence the common name. Leaves appear in clusters on a stalk-like, black/purple-spotted pseudostem. Large, foul-smelling, maroon-purple spathes (each to as much as 20″ long and 8″ wide) appear above the leaves in late spring/early summer. The foul odor of the spathes, sometimes described as akin to the nauseous aroma of rotten meat, attracts flies for pollinating the flowers. Each spathe envelops a central, upright, nearly black, tail-like spike (spadix) which is nearly as long as the spathe, but sometimes longer, with a diameter of only 1/2 to 3/4″. The spathe contains inconspicuous, hidden, unisexual flowers. Flowers are followed by green berries which mature to orange-red in fall. This plant is synonymous with and formerly called Arum dracunculus.
The species is characterised by a large purple spathe and spadix has a very unpleasant smell reminiscent of a carcass. That is because the pollinators of this aroid are flies (Lucilia and others).

Cultivation:
Dracunculus vulgaris has been introduced to northern Europe, and North America, both to the United States, where it is present in the states of Kansas, Oregon, California, Washington, South Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Michigan, the commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and to Canada, where it has been grown in the province of Ontario.The plant can tolerate some shade but prefers full sun; it can also withstand drought but benefits from a little watering. The plant prefers a humus-rich, well-drained soil.

The plant can be easily grown in average, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Prefers moist, rich soils. Spreads by self-seeding and bulb offsets. Plants are not reliably winter hardy throughout the St. Louis area where mulch should be applied in winter to help protect them from cold temperatures. In cold winter areas north of USDA Zone 6, tubers may be dug up in autumn, overwintered indoors and replanted in spring in somewhat the same manner as dahlias.

Medicinal Uses:
Dioscorides thought it resembled a dragon. In ancient medicine it was used for the eyes and ears, for ruptures, convulsions and coughs.  Dioscorides says, “But being beaten small with honey, and applied, it takes away the malignancie of ulcers.”

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracunculus_vulgaris
http://www.cas.vanderbilt.edu/bioimages/species/drvu.htm
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_DE.htm

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=d513

Enhanced by Zemanta