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Ailmemts & Remedies

Snoring

Snoring is a noise produced when an individual breathes (usually produced when breathing in) during sleep which in turn causes vibration of the soft palate and uvula (that thing that hangs down in the back of the throat). The word “apnea” means the abscence of breathing.
All snorers have incomplete obstruction ( a block) of the upper airway. Many habitual snorers have complete episodes of upper airway obstruction where the airway is completly blocked for a period of time, usually 10 seconds or longer. This silence is usually followed by snorts and gasps as the individual fights to take a breath. When an individual snores so loudly that it disturbs others, obstructive sleep apnea is almost certain to be present.

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There is snoring that is an indicator of obstructive sleep apnea and there is also primary snoring.

Primary Snoring, also known as simple snoring, snoring without sleep apnea, noisy breathing during sleep, benign snoring, rhythmical snoring and continous snoring is characterized by loud upper airway breathing sounds in sleep without episodes of apnea (cessation of breath).

How Does Primary Snoring Differ from Snoring that Indicates Obstructive Sleep Apnea?
A complaint of snoring by an observer
No evidence of insomnia or excessive sleepiness due to the snoring
Dryness of the mouth upon awakening
A polysomnogram (sleep study) that shows:
Snoring and other sounds often occurring for long episodes during the sleep period
No associated abrupt arousals, arterial oxygen desaturation (lowered amount of oxygen in the blood) or cardiac disturbances
Normal sleep patterns
Normal respiratory patterns during sleep
No signs of other sleep disorders
What can be done about primary snoring?
First of all, it is absolutely necessary to rule out obstructive sleep apnea or other sleep disorders. Be wary of any doctor who says it is not necessary. Behavioral and lifestyle changes may be suggested. Losing weight, sleeping on your side, refraining from alcohol and sedatives are often recommended.

The Causes Of Snoring:
Modern research reveals snoring to often have more than one cause. These include the many factors that lead to nasal blockage such as nasal allergy or deformities of the nasal septum (the cartilage partition between the two sides of the nose) and other internal nasal structures. This nasal blockage can contribute to poor nasal airflow into the lungs and can in turn set the soft tissues of the palate (roof of the mouth) and throat vibrating. These vibrations cause the loud fluttering noise of snoring.

Other factors which can influence the snoring condition are obesity; lack of fitness or aging and associated loss of general muscle tone, congestion of the throat due to the reflux of stomach acid (heartburn); and the effects of alcohol or smoking.

Congestion of the throat tissues leads to swelling of fluids within the tissues. This causes loss of muscle tone and generally makes the lining tissues of the airways flop. Where nasal congestion causes faulty or turbulent airflow through the airway, then the resonance of these floppy tissues contributes to the noise known as snoring.

Correction of snoring may not only require surgical intervention, but will probably also need cessation of smoking, minimised alcohol consumption, control of gastric acid reflux where neccessary and weight control
.

The Anatomy of the Upper Airway Passages.

CURE & TREATMENT:
Pillar Procedure
The Pillar Procedure is a new snoring treatment.
It is an operation carried out under local anaesthetic in most cases. Three tiny implants, made from woven polyester, are injected into the tissues of the soft palate. Floppiness of the soft palate, that part of the roof of the mouth which extends from the bony hard palate to the uvula (or central, dangling portion of the soft palate), is a frequent contributor to snoring. Stiffening the soft palate has been well known to quieten snoring in selected cases. However, palatal stiffening is suitable for patients who have been carefully evaluated by an ear, nose and throat surgeon with an interest in snoring problems. It does not assist every patient. Other factors may be contributing to snoring in these patients.

Now, what are Pillar implants?
The Pillar implants, made from polyester material, were developed in Europe and now have FDA US Government authority approval for surgical use. This material has been frequently used in medical products and can be safely inserted within the body. The implant creates a fibrous capsule around the implant which is the mechanism of the stiffening.

How do they work?
During the Pillar Procedure, three tiny woven inserts are placed in the soft palate to help reduce both the vibration that causes snoring and the ability of the soft palate to obstruct the airway. The Pillar inserts add structural support to the soft palate over time and prevents palatal fluttering (snoring).

The complex anatomical structure of the upper airway passages is due to the close association of the air, food and fluid passages. We not only breathe through our mouth and nose, but we also eat and drink through our mouth. The food passages of the mouth, throat and oesophagus leading to the stomach are separated from the airway by the soft palate and epiglottis and associated structures of the larynx or voicebox. This normally prevents food or fluid passing into the air passages and lungs. Occasional strong coughing fits are reminders that this is not always the case!

The nasal air passages serve to moisten the air intake and also provide the olfactory, or smell sense. Alternating congestion of the nasal passages helps channel the air intake between the two lungs.

ORAL/DENTAL DEVICES
There are mouth/oral devices (that help keep the airway open) on the market that may help to reduce snoring in three different ways.

Some devices:
bring the jaw forward or
elevate the soft palate or
retain the tongue (from falling back in the airway and thus decreasing snoring).

SURGERY
There is also surgery. Snoring is Not Funny, Not Hopeless. There is uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) or Laser-Assisted Uvulopalatoplasty (LAUP), that involves removing excess tissue from the throat.

The newest surgery, approved by the FDA in July 1997 for treating snoring is called somnoplasty and uses radio frequency waves to remove excess tissue.

Injection Snoreplasty and Non-Surgical Snoring Cures are some other options.

10 Natural Tip for a Silent Night

Home Remedy of Snoring…….(1)

Home Remedy …………...(2 )

Regular Yoga Exercises like Meditation, Breathing Exercise etc. are also a permanent cure for snoring and sleep apnea.

Disclaimer: This information is not meant to be a substitute for professional medical advise or help. It is always best to consult with a Physician about serious health concerns. This information is in no way intended to diagnose or prescribe remedies.

Source: www.snoring.com.au

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Pediatric

Tips for Protecting Your Child from Dog Bites

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Nearly half of all U.S. Children have been bitten by a dog, and boys 5 to 9 years old appear to be at greatest risk. In addition, all children are more likely than adults to receive dangerous bites to the head, face, and neck.

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Still, many bites are preventable if families follow basic safety tips and demonstrate responsible dog ownership. Parents can reduce the risk of your child suffering a potentially dangerous dog bite by following these guidelines:

* Choose a good breed for children. Some dogs are naturally more aggressive than others. Consider a good natured breed like a golden retriever, collie, old English sheepdog, or basset hound.

*Socialize your pet. Expose a puppy to a variety of situations and people, and continue that exposure as it grows older. But do not leave it unsupervised with your children. Many bites occur during playful roughhousing when a child does not realize that the animal is overexcited.

   #Train your dog. It should be willing to respond to commands consistently.
#Teach children never to disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating, or caring for puppies.
#Warn children never to approach a strange dog. Teach them to ask permission from a dog’s owner before petting it.
#Tell children not to run past dogs. Canines naturally like to chase things, and this gives them a reason to become excited and aggressive.
# Tell children never to stare a dog in the eye. The animal interprets it as a challenge and a sign of aggression.
# If a dog threatens your child, tell him or her to remain calm. Children should not turn and run. Tell them to avoid eye contact and stay still until the dog leaves. If they fall or a re knocked to the ground, tell them to curl into a ball with their hands over their heads and necks.

 Education, supervision can prevent dog bites:-   According to a study recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), an estimated 4.5 million people are bitten by dogs in the United States each year. Fortunately, only about 20% of these require medical attention. With more than 52 million dogs kept as pets in the United States, bites will continue to pose a serious health threat to children.

Most of the 52 million dogs in this country kept as pets will never bite or kill anyone. Yet parents should remember that domesticated dogs retain their wild instincts and pose a health threat to their children.

Canine injuries range from simple puncture wounds to severe lacerations. Children are most likely to be bit on the head, face, or neck, while adults generally suffer wounds to the hands and upper arms. Over half are permanently scarred. The highest incidents of dog bite wounds occur in children five to fourteen years of age. Boys suffer dog bites twice as frequently as girls. Many parents falsely assume that their youngsters will be bitten by a strange or wild animal. More than 80% of bites are inflicted by the family pet or an animal known to the child.

Contrary to myth, few dog attacks can be traced to teasing and tormenting. Other human behaviors and characteristics, however, do make dogs more likely to attack them. One is being very young. Infants make up most of the fatal attack victims. It is suspected that these attacks occur because dogs mistake tiny babies for prey, and any breed of dog can make this tragic mistake. Therefore, never, ever leave any dog alone with an infant.

When the circumstances surrounding a bite are known, most dog attacks are provoked. Therefore, children should be educated on behaviors that will lessen their risk for an injury. Here are some guidelines:

· Immediately report stray dogs or dogs displaying unusual behavior.

· Teach children not to approach an unfamiliar dog or run away from a dog that is chasing them. A dog’s natural instinct is to chase and catch someone who is running. Instruct the child to stand still with their hands at their sides. The dog will most likely stop, sniff the youngster, and leave them alone when they realize that the child is not a threat.

· Instruct children not to approach an injured dog (or any other animal). Instead, tell an adult about the animal.

· Do not pet or approach a dog while he or she is eating, sleeping, or guarding something. Pets naturally guard their food, their new puppies, and their toys. Dogs also protect their owners, and the property that belongs to their owners–such as an owner’s home, yard, or car. Toddlers frequently are bitten because they get right in the dog’s face, moving quickly and making high-pitched, unpredictable noises.

· Do not pet a dog without letting it see and sniff you first. Before petting someone elses dog, ask the owner for permission.

·Keep fingers away from a dog’s mouth. ·

·Teach children when it is okay to play with a dog and when to leave the dog alone.

·Most important, parents need to realize that young children need constant supervision when they’re with dogs.

· St. Petersburg veterinarian Dr. Steve Bryan believes early intervention is the best way to avoid bites from the family dog. “All puppies should receive obedience training with the family, “stated Dr. Bryan. “At the first sign of aggressive behavior the owners must act and seek help from the veterinarian, since the first bite is often devastating and leaves no recourse for the pet.”

· Dr. Bryan also commented that the likelihood of a bite inflicted by the family pet can be reduced by choosing more docile breeds. Which bites most? Research usually points to German shepherds, pit bulls, chows, Dobermans, rottweilers, Siberian huskies, malamutes, wolf-hybrids, Akitas, Labradors, cocker spaniels and golden retrievers. Remember, there is a danger in believing that the family is safe because parents have not picked a breed from the “dangerous” list. Remember, any dog can bite.

· If a dog bites once, it is apt to bite again. If parents get a warning, they better act on it. Time for that dog to stay with an uncle on the farm.

The intent of this article is not to scare parents into not owning a dog. Remember, the vast majority of dog – child interactions are wonderful. When parents choose their dog wisely, show them lots of love and take proper precautions, the family pooch will be a welcome addition to the household.

 These dog bite prevention tips are provided courtesy of the American Academy of Pediatrics.