Tag Archives: Bupleurum

Mazus pumilus

Botanical Name: Mazus pumilus
Family: Mazaceae
Genus: Mazus
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Common Names: Japanese mazus, Asian mazus • Nepali : Taapre Jhaar, Maalati Jhaar

Habitat : Mazus pumilus is native to E. Asia – Himalayas from Kashmir to China, Japan, Korea and eastern Russia. It grows on wet grassland, along streams, trailsides, waste fields, wet places and the edges of forests, grassland on mountain slopes at elevations of 1200 – 3800 metres in China.

Description:
Mazus pumilus is an annual herb growing to 0.2 m (0ft 8in). It is in flower from May to October, and the seeds ripen from May to October.

Flower petal color: blue to purple & white

Leaf type: the leaves are simple (i.e., lobed or unlobed but not separated into leaflets)

Leaf arrangement:

*alternate: there is one leaf per node along the stem
*opposite: there are two leaves per node along the stem

Leaf blade edges: the edge of the leaf blade has teeth

Flower symmetry: there is only one way to evenly divide the flower (the flower is bilaterally symmetrical)

Number of sepals, petals or tepals: there are five petals, sepals, or tepals in the flower

Fusion of sepals and petals: the petals or the sepals are fused into a cup or tube

Stamen number: 4

Fruit type (general) : the fruit is dry and splits open when ripe

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It cannot grow in the shade. It prefers moist soil.

Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it could succeed outdoors in many parts of this country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Succeeds in any moderately fertile well-drained but moisture-retentive loamy soil in a sunny position.

Propagation :
Seed – we have no information on this species but suggest sowing the seed in a cold frame in the spring. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring.
Edible Uses: Young leaves – cooked & eaten.
Medicinal Uses:
Aperient; Emmenagogue; Febrifuge; Tonic.

The plant is aperient, emmenagogue, febrifuge and tonic. The juice of the plant is used in the treatment of typhoid.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mazus
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Mazus+pumilus
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Asian%20Mazus.html
https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/species/mazus/pumilus/

Potentilla supina

Botanical Name: Potentilla supina
Family : Rose Family (Rosaceae)
Subfamily :Rosoideae
Category :Finger Herbs ( Potentilla )
Type : Low finger herb
Order : Rosey (Rosales)

Common Name : Lower fingerwort

Habitat : Potentilla supina is native to C. Europe to W. Asia. It grows on dampish waste ground and ditches, 200 – 2500 metres in Turkey.

Description:
Potentilla supina is a annual/perennial herb growing to 0.3 m (1ft). It is a bald to soft-haired, one- year to short-lived perennial, krautige plant . It usually has several, descending, ascending, 10 to 40 centimeter long, branched and rich-flowered stems . The leaves are unpaired feathered two to six pairs of leaflets . The lateral leaflets are elongated to obedient, egg-shaped, coarse-sawed to spatially split, and the endblade is often deeply split, with a length of 1 to 3 centimeters. The top of the page and bottom is green.

The flowering period is rich from May to September. The leaves are inflated in the inflorescence up to the leaf-like shape of the leaves and surpass the young flowers. The flowers are foliage-shaped or seemingly armpit and sit on 5 to 20 millimeters long, after the anthesis downwards bent bloom stalks. The bipedal flowers are radial symmetric and five-fold in diameter from 6 to 10 millimeters. The five sepals are 3 to 4 millimeters long and triangular. The five free, yellow petals are usually shorter than the sepals.

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The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile.
Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and prefers well-drained soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil.
Cultivation:
We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus. Easily grown in a well-drained loam, preferring a position in full sun but tolerating shade. Prefers an alkaline soil but tolerates a slightly acid soil. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer.

Propagation:
Seed – sow early spring or autumn in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division in spring. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Edible Uses:     Young leaves – cooked. An emergency food, it is only used when all else fails.
Medicinal Uses:

Astringent; Febrifuge; Odontalgic; Tonic.

The root is astringent, febrifuge and tonic. Pieces of the root are held in the mouth for 1 – 2 hours to relieve toothache. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion.
Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resurces:
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niedriges_Fingerkraut
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Potentilla+supina

Digitalis grandiflor

Botanical Name : Digitalis grandiflor
Family: Plantaginaceae
Genus: Digitalis
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Lamiales

Common Name :Large Yellow Foxglove or simply Yellow Foxglove

Habitat : Digitalis grandiflor is native to Europe to W. Asia. It grows in the woods in mountains and in drier stonier habitats.
Description:
Digitalis grandiflora is an evergreen Perennial growing to 0.9 m (3ft) by 0.3 m (1ft in) at a medium rate. It is in leaf 12-Jan It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen in September.

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Arising in midsummer from neat clumps of fine-toothed foliage, a mass of soft yellow open bells, speckled brown inside, blooms along one side of a 3-foot-tall stem. Usually described as a perennial, it is more accurate to call it a biennial or short-lived perennial. If the flowering stalk is cut down after blooms have faded, it may rebloom in the fall. When a few flower stalks are left, the plant self-seeds.
The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils. It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought

Cultivation:
An easily grown plant, succeeding in ordinary garden soil, especially if it is rich in organic matter. It also succeeds in dry soils and, once established, is drought tolerant. It prefers semi-shade but succeeds in full sun if the soil is moist. Plants are hardy to about -20°c. A short-lived perennial or biennial. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer and rabbits. Special Features: Not North American native, All or parts of this plant are poisonous, Suitable for cut flowers, Attractive flowers or blooms.
Propagation:
Seed – surface sow early spring in a cold frame. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 4 weeks at 20°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

Medicinal Uses: The leaves are cardiac, stimulant and tonic. They are often used in the treatment of certain heart complaints.

Other Uses: The plant is used as Landscaping ( Border, Specimen.)

Known Hazards: All parts of the plant are poisonous.

Disclaimer : The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplement, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.
Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digitalis
http://www.finegardening.com/yellow-foxglove-digitalis-grandiflora
http://www.pfaf.org/User/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Digitalis+grandiflora

Bupleurum falcatum

Botanical Name : Bupleurum falcatum
Family: Apiaceae
Genus: Bupleurum
Species: B. falcatum
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Apiales

Synonyms:
Bei chai hu, Beichaihu, Bupleuran 2IIc, Bupleurum chinese D.C., Bupleurum exaltatum, Bupleurum falcatum, Bupleurum falcatum L. var. scorzonerifolium, Bupleurum fruticosum L., Bupleurum ginghausenii, Bupleurum longifolium, Bupleurum multinerve, Bupleurum octoradiatum, bupleuri radix (Latin), bupleuri radix saponins, bupleurum root, Bupleurum rotundifolium L., Bupleurum scorzonerifolium Willd, Bupleurum stewartianum, chai hu, chaifu, chaihu (Chinese), chai hu chaiku-saiko, Chinese thoroughwax root, echinocystic acid 3-O-sulfate, hare’s ear root (English), He Jie Decoction, hydroxysaikosaponins, isochaihulactone, juk-siho, kara-saiko, Minor Bupleurum Decoction, mishima-saiko, nanchaihu, northern Chinese thorowax root, phenylpropanoids, radix bupleur, saiko (Japanese), saikospanonins, segl-hareore (Danish), shi ho, sho-saiko-to, shoku-saiko, shrubby hare’s-ear, sickle-leaf hare’s-ear, siho (Korean), thorowax, thoroughwax, TJ-9, triterpene saponins, Umbelliferae (family), wa-saiko, xiao chai hu tang, yamasaiko.

Common Name :Bupleurum, Chinese Thoroughwax and Sickle-leaf hare’s ear,Chai Hu, Hare’s Ear Root

Italian name / Nome italiano: Bupleuro falcato
English name: Thorow-wax
German name: sichelblättriges Hasenohr

Habitat :Scattered throughout Europe, including Britain, and Asia north to the subarctic, east to Japan.Waste places and hedgebanks

Description:
Bupleurum falcatum is a PERENNIAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in) by 0.6 m (2ft).
It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower from Jul to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects.The plant is self-fertile….

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The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Cultivation:
An easily cultivated plant, it succeeds in a sunny position in most fertile well-drained soils.

Propagation :
Seed – sow spring in a cold frame. The seed usually germinates in 2 – 8 weeks at 15°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer or following spring. Division in spring. Very easy, larger clumps can be planted direct into their permanent positions. It is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are well rooted before planting them out in the summer.

Edible Uses: Leaves and young shoots – cooked and eaten.The new growth in spring and autumn is used. It is a good source of rutin.

Medicinal Uses:
Alterative;  Analgesic;  Antibacterial;  Antiinflammatory;  Antiperiodic;  Antipyretic;  Antiviral;  Carminative;  Diaphoretic;  Emmenagogue;  Haemolytic;
Hepatic;  Pectoral;  Poultice;  Sedative.

A paste of the plant is applied to boils. The juice of the roots, mixed with the juice of Centella asiatica, is used in the treatment of liver diseases. This species is closely related to B. chinense and quite possibly has the same uses. It is certainly worthy of some research. The uses of B. chinense are as follows:- Bei chai hu root has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for at least 2,000 years. It is a bitter herb that is used to harmonize the body, balancing the different organs and energies within the body. It strengthens the digestive tract, acts as a tonic for the liver and circulatory system, lowers fevers and has anti-viral effects. The root is alterative, analgesic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiperiodic, antipyretic, antiviral, carminative, diaphoretic, emmenagogue, haemolytic, hepatic, pectoral, sedative. It is taken internally in the treatment of malaria, blackwater fever, uterine and rectal prolapse, haemorrhoids, sluggish liver, menstrual disorders, abdominal bloating etc. The roots are harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried. The root contains saikosides. These saponin-like substances have been shown to protect the liver from toxicity whilst also strengthening its function, even in people with immune system disorders. These saikosides also stimulate the body’s production of corticosteroids and increase their anti-inflammatory affect. The plant is often used in preparations with other herbs to treat the side effects of steroids

Internally used for malaria, blackwater fever, uterine and rectal prolapse, herpes simplex, hemorrhoids, sluggish liver associated with mood instability, menstrual disorders and abdominal bloating.  Often used raw with wine for feverish illnesses, with vinegar as a circulatory stimulant, and mixed with tortoise blood for malaria. First mentioned in Chinese medical texts around AD200, it is one of the most important Chinese herbs for treating the liver because it acts on diseases of a mixed conformation, both internal and chronic and both external and acute, both hot and cold, both deficient and excess.  It is one of the major chi regulating or carminative herbs that help regulate moodiness.  It has a strong ascending energy, so that it is also added in small amounts to tonic formulas to raise the yang-vitality, treat organ prolapse and raise sagging spirits.  It is used for hepatitis and all liver disorders and to help resolve and bring out eruptic diseases.  One of the peculiarities of Bupleurum is its capacity to ‘dredge’ out old emotions of sadness and anger that may be stored in the organs and tissues of the body.

The root contains saikosides. These saponin-like substances have been shown to protect the liver from toxicity whilst also strengthening its function, even in people with immune system disorders. These saikosides also stimulate the body’s production of corticosteroids and increase their anti-inflammatory affect. The plant is often used in preparations with other herbs to treat the side effects of steroids. Promising new research out of China and Japan has shown Bupleurum’s ability to protect the adrenal glands from steroid-induced atrophy.

In Ayurvedic medicine it would be considered to be anti-kapha and anti-pitta but pro-vata.  Ayurvedic doctors do not normally used this herb but a combination of turmeric and barberry root.

Other Uses : The old plant is used as a fuel.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_AB.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bupleurum_falcatum
http://www.globalherbalsupplies.com/herb_information/bupleurum.htm
http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Bupleurum%20falcatum
http://luirig.altervista.org/schedeit/ae/bupleurum_falcatum.htm

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Oyster Shell

Latin Plant Name: Concha Ostreae

Pinyin Mandarin Name: Mu Li

Common English Name:  Oyster Shell

Parts Used : Whole shell (crushed)

Nature: Cool

Taste :Salty, astringent

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Meridians Entered: Liver, Kidneys

Common Usages:   Oyster shell is used in formulas to treat irritability with associated symptoms of palpitations, insomnia, and anxiety, and sometimes ringing in the ears, blurred vision, and flushed face (TCM: Yin deficiency); also used to treat night sweats, nocturnal emissions, heartburn, and goiter.

Traditional Usages and Functions:  Settles and calms Spirit; benefits Yin and restrains floating Yang; prevents leakage of fluids; softens hardness and dissipates nodules; absorbs acidity and alleviates pain.

Common Formulas Used InBupleurum and Dragon Bone; Tang Gui and Indigo.

Processing Required : Must be used after proper processing

Cautions in Use :  Do not use where there is high fever with no sweatin
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Oyster Shell Calcium 500 +D – Bone Health

Calcium Oyster Shell
Calcium Oyster Shell Oral

Oyster Shell Calcium

Resources:
http://www.acupuncture-and-chinese-medicine.com/oyster-shell.html