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Herbs & Plants

Elaeagnus angustifolia

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Botanical Name : Elaeagnus angustifolia
Family: Elaeagnaceae
Genus: Elaeagnus
Species: E. angustifolia
Kingdom: Plantae
Order: Rosales

Common Name :Russian silverberry, oleaster, or Russian-olive

Habitat : Elaeagnus angustifolia is  native to western and central Asia, from southern Russia and Kazakhstan to Turkey and Iran. It is now also widely established in North America as an introduced species.It grows by  side of  streams and along river banks to 3000 metres in Turkey

Description:

Elaeagnus angustifolia is a deciduous Shrub growing to 7 m (23ft) by 7 m (23ft) at a medium rate.
It is not frost tender. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from Sep to October. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It can fix Nitrogen.
Elaeagnus angustifolia is a usually thorny shrub or small tree growing to 5–7 m in height. Its stems, buds, and leaves have a dense covering of silvery to rusty scales. The leaves are alternate, lanceolate, 4–9 cm long and 1-2.5 cm broad, with a smooth margin. The highly aromatic flowers, produced in clusters of 1-3, are 1 cm long with a four-lobed creamy yellow corolla; they appear in early summer and are followed by clusters of fruit, a small cherry-like drupe 1-1.7 cm long, orange-red covered in silvery scales. The fruits are edible and sweet, though with a dryish, mealy texture. Its common name comes from its similarity in appearance to the olive (Olea europaea), in a different botanical family, Oleaceae.

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The shrub can fix nitrogen in its roots, enabling it to grow on bare mineral substrates.

Cultivation :
Elaeagnus angustifolia was described as Zizyphus cappadocica by John Gerard, was certainly grown by John Parkinson by 1633,  and was being grown in Germany in 1736. It is now widely grown across southern and central Europe as a drought-resistant ornamental plant for its scented flowers, edible fruit, attractive silver foliage, and black bark.

The species was introduced into North America in the late 19th century, and subsequently escaped cultivation, because its fruits, which seldom ripen in England, are relished by birds which disperse the seeds. Russian-olive is considered to be an invasive species in many places in the United States because it thrives on poor soil, has low seedling mortality rates, matures in a few years, and outcompetes wild native vegetation. It often invades riparian habitats where overstory cottonwoods have died.

Propagation:
Establishment and reproduction of Elaeagnus angustifolia is primarily by seed, although some spread by vegetative propagation also occurs. The fruit is readily eaten and disseminated by many species of birds. The plants begin to flower and fruit from three years old.
Edible Uses:
Fruits are eaten raw or cooked as a seasoning in soups. Dry, sweet and mealy. The fruit can also be made into jellies or sherbets. The fruit must be fully ripe before it can be enjoyed raw, if even slightly under-ripe it will be quite astringent. The oval fruit is about 10mm long and contains a single large seed. Seed – raw or cooked. It can be eaten with the fruit though the seed case is rather fibrous.

Medicinal Uses:
Some people are reported to use the seed oil, like olive oil, for bronchitis, burns, catarrh, and constipation. Flowers are used for fever, neuralgia, and aching burns, allegedly bringing people back from their deathbeds.  The astringent leaves are used for enteritis and fever.  The oil from the seeds is used with syrup as an electuary in the treatment of catarrh and bronchial affections. The juice of the flowers has been used in the treatment of malignant fevers. It is a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers. The ripe fruits have been used to treat amoebic dysentery. There is general belief that leaves and fruits of the plant have antipyretic effect. In folk medicine, oleaster fruit or flower preparations are used for treating nausea, vomiting, jaundice, asthma, and flatulence. An infusion of the fruit has been used in Iranian traditional medicine as an analgesic agent for alleviating pain in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The flower is also traditionally used for treating tetanus.  Juice of flower is used in Spain for malignant fever. Oil from the seed is used in catarrhal and bronchial affections. Locally the fruit is used as blood purifier and for coughs.

The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers.

Other Uses:
Plants can be grown as a hedge in exposed positions, tolerating maritime exposure. It is fairly fast-growing and very tolerant of pruning, but is rather open in habit and does not form a dense screen. Because the plant fixes atmospheric nitrogen, it makes a hedge that enriches the soil rather than depriving it of nutrients. An essential oil obtained from the flowers is used in perfumery. A gum from the plant is used in the textile industry in calico printing. Wood – hard, fine-grained. Used for posts, beams, domestic items, it is also much used for carving. The wood is an excellent fuel.

Disclaimer:
The information presented herein is intended for educational purposes only. Individual results may vary, and before using any supplements, it is always advisable to consult with your own health care provider.

Resources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaeagnus_angustifolia
http://www.herbnet.com/Herb%20Uses_RST.htm?Voucher2=Connect+to+Internet
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datei:Elaeagnus_angustifolia_20050608_859.jpg
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/elan1.htm

http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Elaeagnus+angustifolia

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Herbs & Plants

Heliotropium indicum

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Botanical Name : Heliotropium indicum
Family: Boraginaceae
Genus: Heliotropium
Species: H. indicum
Kingdom: Plantae
Common  Indian Name: Hasti Sundi

Other Common Names:
*Indian heliotrope (English)
*Indian turnsole (English)
*Erysipela plant (English)
*Bigotitos (Spanish)
*Trompa elefante (Spanish)
*Lengua de Sapo (Spanish)
*Elepante (Cebuano)
*Kambra-kambra (Cebuano)
*Buntot-leon (Tagalog)
*Trompa ng elepante (Tagalog)
*Kuting-kutingan (Tagalog)
*Pengñga-pengñga (Ilocano)
*Uladulad (Kapampangan)
*Vòi voi (Vietnamese)
*Siriyari or Hathsura- (Hindi and Urdu)
*Hatisur (BENGALI)
*Thel kodukku (Tamil)
*Chelukondi Gida (Kannada)
*Thekkada (Malayalam)

Habitat: Heliotropium indicum  is  native to Asia or perhaps South America. Stablished in all tropical and sub tropical countries on the earth. It normally  grows in disturbed areas close to water sources.Low moist alluvial woods,muddy banks, gravel bars,waste ground.

Other informations: This species can be found in southern part of Missuri. This plant is easy to identify because of its rugose leaves and curled inflorescences, which have blue flowers.This plant is an introduced species and can be weedy but it grows well from seeds and would make a good garden subject.

Description:
Indian heliotrope is an annual, erect, branched plant that can grow to a height of about 15–50 centimetres (5.9–19.7 in). It has a hairy stem, bearing alternating ovate to oblong-ovate leaves. It has small white flowers with a green calyx; five stamens borne on a corolla tube; a terminal style; and a four-lobed ovary……….CLICK  &  SEE  THE  PICTURES

Inflorescence – the inflorescence of Heliotropium species uncoils after the central flowers, which are the oldest, mature. The flowers are arranged on only one side of the inflorescence.

Flowers – the petals are fused into a tube, with widely spreading lobes.
Fruits – immature fruit, the two lobes of the fruit are visible

Anti-inflammatory activity of Heliotropium indicum Linn and Leucas aspera spreng. in albino rats


Objective:
To study the anti-inflammatory effect of Heliotropium indicum, and Leucas aspera on carrageenin induced hind paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Methods: Hind paw oedema was produced by subplantar injection of carrageenin and paw volume was measured plethysmometrically at ‘0’ and ‘3’ hours intervals after injection. Cotton pellet granuloma was produced by implantation of 50 ( 1 mg sterile cotton in each axilla under ether anaesthesia. The animals were treated with H. indicum and L. aspera and the standard drugs viz., acetylsalicylic acid and phenylbutazone. Results: H. indicum and L. aspera produced significant anti-inflammatory effect in both acute and subacute models of inflammation. In acute inflammation, L. aspera was more effective than acetylsalicylic acid. However in subacute inflammation, these two drugs were found to be less effective than phenylbutazone. Conclusion: H. indicum and L. aspera possess anti-inflammatory effects in both acute and subacute inflammation.

Medicinal Uses:
Traditional medicine:
In the Philippines, the plant is chiefly used as a traditional medicine. The extracted juice from the pounded leaves of the plants is used on wounds, skin ulcers and furuncles. The juice is also used as an eye drop for conjunctivitis. The pounded leaves are used as poultice.

In Indian Ayurveda Hasti Sundi (Heliotropium indicum) is very useful for the treatment of Oedema.(As per allayurveda.com)

Known Hazards:   Heliotropium indicum contains tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

Resources:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliotropium_indicum
http://www.sbs.utexas.edu/bio406d/images/pics/bor/heliotropium_indicum.htm